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Spectrum, IEEE

Issue 9 • Date September 2012

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Displaying Results 1 - 20 of 20
  • IEEE Spectrum - Cover

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): c1 - c2
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1 - 3
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  • DIY publishing [Back Story]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 4
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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 6
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  • Our smartphones, ourselves

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 10
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  • Argument over the value of solar focuses on Spain

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 13 - 14
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  • Tech industry money in U.S. elections

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 15 - 16
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  • The rich and their reactors

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 17
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  • Predicting the future of drought prediction

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 18 - 22
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  • The big picture

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 24 - 25
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  • Where the jobs are: 2012 [Careers]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 26
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  • Review: MITx's online circuit and analysis course [Education]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 27 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Reformulating displays [Tools & Toys]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 28 - 29
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  • I, publisher [Hands on]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 30 - 32
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  • Disposable electronics [Reflections]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 34
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  • The truth about terahertz

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 36 - 41
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
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    Anyone hoping to exploit this promising region of the electromagnetic spectrum must confront its very daunting physics. Wirelessly transfer huge files in the blink of an eye! Detect bombs, poison gas clouds, and concealed weapons from afar! Peer through walls with T-ray vision! You can do it all with terahertz technology-or so you might believe after perusing popular accounts of the subject. View full abstract»

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  • How i quantified myself

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 42 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    One warm night last February, I lay down to bed feeling like a lab mouse. A heat-and motion-sensing arm-band gauged my energy expenditure, another activity tracker clipped to my waistband recorded movement, a blood-pressure cuff connected to my iPad squeezed my right arm, and a brainwave-sensing headband would soon monitor my sleep. A scale linked by Bluetooth to an app on my iPad sat on the bathroom floor. With consistent use, these devices would provide a numeric picture of my general health and behaviors. They would give me intimate knowledge of my physical self, with all the information displayed neatly in graphs and charts. Not too many years ago, you had to go to medical specialists to get this kind of biological data. Now, whether your problem is migraines or mood swings, you can keep track of your ailment with a consumer device that costs around US $100. As these healthand-wellness gadgets proliferate, a “quantified self” movement is gaining strength: It's attracting athletes, fitness buffs, data lovers, hypochondriacs, and people just trying to lose some weight. View full abstract»

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  • Tapping the power of 100 suns

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 48 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Napoleon's dictum no longer applies: These days, an army marches not so much on its stomach as on its batteries. Without them, soldiers can't see in the dark, work their radios, or determine their positions. But even the best storage batteries-accounting for one-fifth of the load in a typical infantryman's 45-kilogram pack- can't last the week or so that field soldiers require. The same problem is coming to afflict the rest of us, as we become ever more dependent on our smartphones and GPS navigation. View full abstract»

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  • Generation smartphone

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 54 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    It??s the year 2020 and newlyweds Tom and Sara are expecting their first child. Along with selecting the latest high-tech stroller, picking out a crib, and decorating the nursery, they download the ??NewBorn?? application suite to their universal communicator; they??re using what we??ll call a SmartPhone 20.0. Before the due date, they take the phone on a tour of the house, letting the phone??s sensors and machine-learning algorithms create light and sound ??fingerprints?? for each room. When they settle Tom Jr. down for his first nap at home, they place the SmartPhone 20.0 in his crib. Understanding that the crib is where the baby sleeps, the SmartPhone activates its sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) application and uses its built-in microphone, accelerometers, and other sensors to monitor little Tommy??s heartbeat and respiration. The ??Baby Position?? app analyzes the live video stream to ensure that Tommy does not flip over onto his stomach??a position that the medical journals still report contributes to SIDS. Of course, best practices in child rearing seem to change quickly, but Tom and Sara aren??t too worried about that because the NewBorn application suite updates itself with the latest medical findings. To lull Tommy to sleep, the SmartPhone 20.0 plays music, testing out a variety of selections and learning by observation which music is most soothing for this particular infant. Generation Smartphone The smartphone??s role as constant companion, helper, coach, and guardian has only just begun. View full abstract»

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  • The data

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 72
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IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

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Editor-in-Chief
Susan Hassler
IEEE Spectrum Magazine