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Wireless Communications, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date August 2012

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • IEEE Wireless Communications - Front cover

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Special Issue [Message from the Editor-in-Chief]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Green wireless communications: from concept to reality [Industry Perspectives]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 4 - 5
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (85 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Green wireless communications has recently attracted a lot of attention. Most recent work on green wireless communications focuses on energy efficiencies and sustainable/renewable energies. In a broader sense, however, green wireless communications could also include wireless communications using environmentally sustainable materials, occupying less land space, accompanying less electromagnetic pollution, together with waste recycling and reducing wastes, and cost reductions. View full abstract»

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  • On moving the upper "frontier" of commercial wireless use [Spectrum Policy and Regulatory Issues]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 6
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    International spectrum allocations of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) now go to an upper limit of 275 GHz. The upper limit of actual production commercial equipment appears to be in the 80 GHz range in the millimeterwaves or "mmW" region (30-300 GHz). While these upper frequencies have been often associated with fixed and satellite uses, the emergence of IEEE 802.11ad/WiGig mobile standards at 60 GHz [1] and interest in broadband mobile applications above 100 GHz shows that many different uses may now be possible. View full abstract»

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  • Cognitive radio networks: a practical perspective [Guest Editorial]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 7 - 8
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    Contemporary wireless systems must meet increased bandwidth requirements due to the persistent trend for higher multimedia data rates. Increased bandwidth may be achieved by developing efficient strategies for spectrum management. The cognitive radio (CR) concept proposes to push the dynamic spectrum access and efficient resource allocation beyond its traditional limits, by introducing spectrum sharing, coexistence, and cooperation among heterogeneous wireless networks. Although this approach has been recognized worldwide by standardization bodies, challenges and open issues still exist for its implementation in the real world. View full abstract»

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  • Future of wireless communication: RadioApps and related security and radio computer framework

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 9 - 16
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    This article introduces a novel flexible mobile device reconfiguration classes (MDRCs) framework which is expected to be applicable to future generation mass market radio devices. This framework sets the scene for a vision of a smooth evolution of reconfigurability features in mobile devices, paving the way from current, mainly static implementation choices toward a fully flexible device platform environment. For this flexible mobile device framework, baseband interfaces are introduced as they are currently discussed in ETSI reconfigurable radio systems standardization. Furthermore, this technical solution is positioned with respect to security requirements and the basic regulatory framework which is currently under revision in Europe. Indeed, the future revised Radio Equipment and Telecommunications Terminal Equipment Directive is expected to allow for such advanced reconfiguration, enabling users to acquire and install so-called RadioApps software components which may affect the compliance of a mobile device to the essential requirements of the Directive. View full abstract»

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  • How a layered rem architecture brings cognition to today's mobile networks

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 17 - 24
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (275 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this article, we present a layered radio environment map architecture along with its applications to the self-organizing network functionalities of heterogeneous LTE radio access networks comprising macrocells and femtocells. In this architecture, the functional blocks reappear with different spatial and temporal granularity at different architectural layers. Although the radio environment map is one of the key promising technologies to enable future cognitive radio networks, it can be already applied to provide limited cognitive capabilities to today's commercial networks too. We explain why, and show how, this architecture can support today??s LTE self-organizing network functions like automatic neighbor relation and minimization of drive tests, and also allow the smooth introduction of new radio access technologies through refarming. We also demonstrate some of the quantitative benefits adopting radio environment map technologies can bring using the minimization of drive tests as an example. View full abstract»

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  • Scenario making for assessment of secondary spectrum access

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 25 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (192 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Secondary spectrum access, through which secondary users opportunistically access the underutilized radio spectrum, has emerged as a solution to cope with the perceived spectrum scarcity. The potential of secondary spectrum has therefore attracted industry players and regulators worldwide. To assess the real-life benefits of the secondary spectrum, it is crucial to estimate the amount of spectrum available for secondary use. This estimation requires a well defined set of models and parameters, which are collectively termed a scenario. In this article, we demonstrate the importance of scenario making in the quantitative assessment of secondary spectrum access. We first describe the elements that constitute a comprehensive secondary access scenario: a primary system and spectrum, a secondary system and usage, and the methods and context of spectrum sharing. Then we demonstrate how the assessment results of the spectrum availability differ depending on the scenario elements. We also illustrate the crucial aspects of a scenario in the business analysis, which, together with the technical assessment, is the input for the regulatory decision. View full abstract»

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  • Worldwide trends in regulation of secondary access to white spaces using cognitive radio

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 32 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (230 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We review the state of the art in worldwide regulation of cognitive radio-based secondary access to radio spectrum. Emerging regulatory trends with regards to incumbent protection and detection, operation parameters of cognitive radio, and secondary licensing models in the United States, United Kingdom, Europe, and elsewhere are reviewed and compared. Particular emphasis is given to cognitive radio operation in unused portions of TV bands, the so-called TV white spaces. Initial views on regulatory feasibility of secondary access to civilian radar and military bands are presented. View full abstract»

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  • A taxonomy of coexistence mechanisms for heterogeneous cognitive radio networks operating in TV white spaces

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 41 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (381 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With the development of dynamic spectrum access technologies, such as cognitive radio, the secondary use of underutilized TV broadcast spectrum has come a step closer to reality. Recently, a number of wireless standards that incorporate CR technology have been finalized or are being developed to standardize systems that will coexist in the same TV white spaces. In these wireless standards, the widely studied problem of primary-secondary network coexistence has been addressed by the use of incumbent geolocation databases augmented with spectrum sensing techniques. However, the challenging problem of secondary-secondary coexistence??in particular, heterogeneous secondary coexistence- has garnered much less attention in the standards and related literature. The coexistence of heterogeneous secondary networks poses challenging problems due to a number of factors, including the disparity of PHY/MAC strategies of the coexisting systems. In this article, we discuss the mechanisms that have been proposed for heterogeneous coexistence, and propose a taxonomy of those mechanisms targeting TVWSs. Through this taxonomy, our aim is to offer a clear picture of the heterogeneous coexistence issues and related technical challenges, and shed light on the possible solution space. View full abstract»

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  • A cloud model and concept prototype for cognitive radio networks

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 49 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (662 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The FCC's approval for the first commercial operation in TV white space gives new momentum to the development of cognitive radio in TVWS. On the other hand, the rapid growth of Cloud computing makes it possible and more economical to build a CR metropolitan area network with commodity hardware. In view of the opportunity and challenges brought about by these two technologies, we propose a CR cloud networking model that is able to support CR access in TVWS. Making use of the flexible and vast computing capacity of the cloud, a database and a cooperative spectrum sensing algorithm that estimates the radio power map of licensed users are realized on a CR cloud implemented with Microsoft??s Windows Azure Cloud platform. The CRC can support CSS, dynamic spectrum access and mobility management. A medium access control protocol is also developed for this CRCN model to collect sensing reports and provide access to the TVWS and CRC services. Through this CRCN prototype, important network parameters such as the mean squared errors in CSS, the CR channel vacating delay, and the cloud-based handover time are measured for the design and deployment of the CRCN concept. View full abstract»

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  • Testbed for combination of local sensing with geolocation database in real environments

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 59 - 66
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    This article describes an experimental testbed that combines wireless microphone sensors with a web-based terrestrial digital video broadcasting geolocation database and a program making and special events spectrumbooking platform. Software defined radio and Internet technologies are the enabling tools in use. The key sensing techniques are identified and implemented. Test trials in a real scenario have shown that the platform was able to receive information from a DVB-T geolocation database and a PMSE spectrum-booking platform, updating the list of vacant channels with blind sensing techniques. The proposed method has shown capabilities to protect primary users of interferences from secondary users of the spectrum. View full abstract»

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  • Transforming healthcare and medical telemetry through cognitive radio networks

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 67 - 73
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (902 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Wireless Medical Telemetry Services (WMTS) band has been established by the FCC in the United States for transmission of data related to a patient??s health, and similar reserved channels exist for life-critical communications throughout the world. However, transmissions in the WMTS band are severely hampered by interferences from adjacent digital television channels, and due to non-uniform access priority, as this band is also shared by utility telemetry and government installations. In this article, we propose the use of cognitive radio technology to dynamically utilize the WMTS frequencies based on the activity patterns of the high priority users, and the quality of service constraints of the patients?? data, while ensuring protection to existing higher priority transmissions and the safe operation of sensitive medical equipment. The priority users here are utility telemetry transmissions in certain portions of the WMTS band, government run radar sites, and legacy medical telemetry equipment without cognitive radio capability. We provide the first measurements on the complete WMTS spectrum activity at two major hospital locations in the Boston area, and outline an optimization framework that assigns frequency and transmission power jointly in this setting. The article also discusses the current state of the art and the major challenges in the implementation of this new cognitive radio assisted medical telemetry paradigm. View full abstract»

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  • Cognitive radio for medical body area networks using ultra wideband

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 74 - 81
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Wearable wireless medical sensors beneficially impact the healthcare sector, and this market is experiencing rapid growth. In the United States alone, the telecommunications services market for the healthcare sector is forecast to increase from $7.5 billion in 2008 to $11.3 billion in 2013. Medical body area networks improve the mobility of patients and medical personnel during surgery, accelerate the patients?? recovery, and facilitate the remote monitoring of patients suffering from chronic diseases. Currently, MBANs are being introduced in unlicensed frequency bands, where the risk of mutual interference with other electronic devices can be high. Techniques developed during the evolution of cognitive radio can potentially alleviate these problems in medical communication environments. In addition, these techniques can help increase the efficiency of spectrum usage to accommodate the rapidly growing demand for wireless MBAN solutions and enhance coexistence with other collocated wireless systems. This article proposes a viable architecture of an MBAN with practical CR features based on ultra wideband radio technology. UWB signals offer many advantages to MBANs, and some features of this technology can be exploited for effective implementation of CR. We discuss the physical and MAC layer aspects of the proposal in addition to the implementation challenges. View full abstract»

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  • Toward secure cognitive communications in wireless networks

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 82 - 88
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    Wireless networks are challenged in efficiency and security. This article is devoted to the fundamental study of cognitive communications in wireless networks after analyzing the limitations in today??s cognitive radios. The research scope includes architecture design, resource management, anti-interference/interception system design through multi-layer diversity, routing anonymity, and security analysis. View full abstract»

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  • On QoE monitoring and E2E service assurance in 4G wireless networks

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 89 - 96
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (399 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    From the users and service providers point of view, the upcoming 4G wireless (WiMAX and LTE) networks are expected to deliver high performance sensitive applications like live mobile TV, video calling, mobile video services, etc. The 4G networks are intended to provide an accurate service view of customer-perceived service quality ?? their ??Quality of Experience?? or QoE. Delivering high QoE depends on factors that contribute to the user??s perception of the target services as well as the Quality of Service (QoS) of the network. Although a better network QoS in many cases will result in better QoE, fulfilling all traffic QoS parameters alone may not guarantee satisfied users. On the other hand, if the QoS of the network degrades, the QoE of users' applications could be affected significantly. This article presents an integrated view of End-to- End (E2E) QoS and service assurance support in WiMAX and LTE networks. The integrated view also considers the existing cross-layer implementations to achieve the necessary E2E QoS and how the QoS and QoE should and can be monitored over the network in an E2E fashion. The existing cross-layer implementations ensure the E2E QoS performance before establishing the applications. However, even though the network has strong QoS support, the service providers should still monitor the QoS of the network and QoE of users?? applications accurately to achieve service quality assurance. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Wireless Communications Magazine deals with all technical and policy issues related to personalization, location-independent communications in all media.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Hsiao-Hwa Chen
Cheng Kung University, Taiwan