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Network, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date July-August 2012

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • IEEE Network [cover]

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Open call issue [Editor's Note]

    Page(s): 2 - 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Architecting a national optical fiber open-access network: The Australian Challenge

    Page(s): 4 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (791 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this article we discuss the challenges faced when building a national optical access network that is ubiquitous (i.e., reaches all households nationwide) and open access (i.e., allows any provider to offer their services over it). Our work is inspired by a public fiber access network being built in Australia called the National Broadband Network (NBN) that will deploy fiber to 93 percent of premises, providing broadband access at potential data rates of 100 Mb/s and above. We highlight how the nationwide open access nature of the network creates new architectural challenges, in terms of both fiber layout as well as interconnection with private providers competing to offer retail services. We identify some of the technical choices related to the support of advanced features such as quality of service, multicast, and reliability, and discuss potential challenges providers may face when rolling out their services in such a network. View full abstract»

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  • Risks associated with next generation access networks investment scenarios

    Page(s): 11 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (207 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The deployment of next generation access networks (NGAs) is investigated from technical, regulatory and investment perspectives. A brief review of the possible network architectures and deployment scenarios of NGAs is provided. Risk calculations of these NGA scenarios are performed based on a fully detailed techno-economic model. Furthermore, the effectiveness of the European Commission's Recommendation on regulated access to NGAs, aiming to tackle the regulatory trade-off between encouraging investments and promoting competition, is discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Formation reconfiguration for mobile robots with network connectivity constraints

    Page(s): 18 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4973 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Future systems of networked autonomous vehicles, such as unmanned aerial or ground vehicles, may rely on peer-to-peer wireless communication to coordinate their actions. The physical formation of the network may need to be reconfigured at times based on the specified missions. However, reconfiguring the physical formation also impacts the link connectivity and hence the connectivity of the network. If the network is partitioned, the autonomous vehicles can no longer coordinate their movements, and the mission may fail. In this article, we discuss techniques to transform the formation of a system of autonomous vehicles while preserving network connectivity. Several different approaches to address this problem are presented, with the focus on a method that utilizes ideas from routing packets in networks. We also briefly discuss the problem of formation selection and give an example of formation optimization in which communication costs are minimized under constraints on preserving network connectivity and the amount of movement required. View full abstract»

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  • Radar chart: scanning for satisfactory QoE in QoS dimensions

    Page(s): 25 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (337 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The ongoing convergence of QoE and QoS studies to give a thorough understanding of the end user has posed numerous exciting possibilities for network and multimedia researchers. However, there is not yet a proper visualization tool that is able to map the many-to-one relationship between QoS metrics and QoE, leaving researchers speechless in the cacophony of traditional two-dimensional diagrams. Although mostly employed in qualitative analysis, we found the radar chart, with a few tweaks, surprisingly suitable for the purpose. In this article, we present our adaptation of the radar chart, and demonstrate in a voice-over-IP context its use in single- and cross-application performance analysis, application recommendation, and network diagnosis. View full abstract»

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  • Managing smart grid information in the cloud: opportunities, model, and applications

    Page(s): 32 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (854 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Smart grid (SG), regarded as the next-generation electric grid, will use advanced power, communication, and information technologies to create an automated, intelligent, and widely distributed energy delivery network. In this article, we explore how cloud computing (CC), a next-generation computing paradigm, can be used for information management of the SG and present a novel SG information management paradigm, called Cloud Service-Based SG Information Management (CSSGIM). We analyze the benefits and opportunities from the perspectives of both the SG and CC domains. We further propose a model for CSSGIM and present four motivating applications. View full abstract»

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  • The internet of energy: a web-enabled smart grid system

    Page(s): 39 - 45
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1844 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The quest for sustainable energy models is the main factor driving research on smart grid technology. SGs represent the bridging paradigm to enable highly efficient energy production, transport, and consumption along the whole chain, from the source to the user. Although this concept promises to be very fruitful, the research on how to deploy it in the real world has just begun. A discussion on the enabling technologies for SGs and a possible roadmap for the profitable evolution thereof is the focus of this article. After introducing the recent trends that are pushing the SG paradigm, we will discuss various key scenarios for the SG, and briefly introduce some of its key requirements. We will then provide an analysis of how current and future standard solutions in the areas of communications and networking can be engineered into a system that fulfills the needs of the SG vision. We advocate the use of small, cheap, and resource-constrained devices with pervasive computing capabilities as the key component to deploy a ubiquitous energy control system. To this end, the recent efforts carried out by Internet standardization bodies such as the IETF and W3C toward the vision of the Internet of Things (IoT) are especially relevant. The various components of the proposed solution have been successfully showcased in real-world implementations, and relevant actors such as ETSI, ZigBee, and IPSO are already evaluating their potential for future IoT applications, making the Internet-based smart grid vision considered in this article practically achievable in the not too distant future. View full abstract»

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  • Toward efficient radio spectrum utilization: user cooperation in cognitive radio networking

    Page(s): 46 - 52
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (545 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In a cooperative cognitive radio network, secondary users are able to negotiate with primary users for dedicated transmission opportunities through providing tangible service. Two novel and simple user cooperation frameworks are introduced to improve the spectral efficiency and utilization. To this end, an orthogonal signaling-based cooperation technology for leveraging the degrees of freedom in two-dimensional modulation is discussed. In the proposed framework, anSU is enabled to simultaneously transmit its own data and relay another user's packets in two orthogonal channels. Specifically, in the framework of user cooperation between PUs and SUs, a cross-layer design for cooperative communications between an active PU and an SU is first investigated. In the framework of cooperative spectrum leasing by a group of SUs, a cross-layer design for cooperation among SUs is then presented. Cooperation performance in terms of a weighed sum throughput maximization under certain power and throughput constraints is evaluated and analyzed in both frameworks via simulations. View full abstract»

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  • Social computing: an intersection of recommender systems, trust/reputation systems, and social networks

    Page(s): 53 - 58
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (171 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Computational applications now go beyond personal computing, facilitating collaboration and social interactions. Social computing is an area of information technology concerned with the intersection of human and social studies connected by computer networks. The primary goal of this article is to provide a brief survey of three popular social computing services: recommender systems, trust/reputation systems, and social networks. We approach these services from a data representation perspective and discuss two of their main challenges: network sparsity and coldstart problems. We also present a novel graph model, which provides an abstract taxonomy and a common data representation model for the three services. We are mainly motivated by the power of graph theory in data representation and analysis for social computing services. Through this model, we believe that it becomes clearer that data from different contexts can be related such that new solutions can be explored; thus, it may provide illumination for the aforementioned problems and stimulate new research. View full abstract»

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  • Quantum networking and internetworking

    Page(s): 59 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (192 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Quantum networks build on entanglement and quantum measurement to bring new capabilities to communication systems. Quantum physical effects can be used to detect eavesdropping, to improve the shared sensitivity of separated astronomical instruments, or to create distributed states that will enable numerical quantum computation over a distance using teleportation. Because quantum data is fragile and some quantum operations are probabilistic, errors and distributed calculations must be managed aggressively and perhaps cooperatively among nodes. Solutions to these problems will have both similarities to and differences from purely classical networks. Architectures for large-scale quantum networking and internetworking are in development, paralleling theoretical and experimental work on physical layers and low-level error management and connection technologies. With unentangled quantum networks already deployed, entangled networks may appear within the next few years and will form a vibrant research topic in the coming decade. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Network covers topics which include: network protocols and architecture; protocol design and validation; communications software; network control, signaling and management; network implementation (LAN, MAN, WAN); and micro-to-host communications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Xuemin (Sherman) Shen, PhD
Engineering University of Waterloo