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Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Aug. 2012

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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): C1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management publication information

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): C2
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  • Editorial for August 2012 Issue

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 345 - 347
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  • The Consumer Choice of E-Channels as a Purchasing Avenue: An Empirical Investigation of the Communicative Aspects of Information Quality

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 348 - 363
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2063 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The vast majority of retail customers use electronic channels (e-channels) to search for product information, but do not complete the purchasing process online. This research investigates the role of information quality in transitioning retail consumers to complete the purchasing process online, thereby replacing physical channels with online channels. This research makes three contributions: 1) it highlights the importance of information quality and its influence on a consumer's choice to use e-channels to purchase online; 2) it supports the premise that high-quality information can convert experience attributes into search attributes; and 3) it identifies four antecedents that increase perceived information quality: higher telepresence, screening capability, channel trustworthiness, and lower cognitive overhead. Data from 309 consumers were analyzed using structural equation modeling and regression. Implications and future research avenues are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • The Grass is Always Greener on The Other Side: A Test of Present and Alternative Job Utility on IT Professionals’ Turnover

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 364 - 378
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (782 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The costs associated with the turnover of information technology (IT) professionals continue to draw the attention of IT managers and researchers. Although a weak labor market has limited the quantity of turnover, organizations' most skilled IT personnel are still coveted and valuable resources. These IT professionals are also those most equipped to leave their firm and find new work. In order to reduce costs, retain key employees, and manage turnover, managers need to understand the factors that drive quitting behavior. The research model suggests that the utility of present and alternative IT work are key cognitive influences on an IT professional's decision to search for new employment, intention to quit, and, ultimately, turnover. We test the research model using longitudinal data that include actual turnover behavior. The research model explains 44% of the variance in intention to quit and 13% of the variance in actual turnover. After establishing the influence of utility on the quitting process, we conduct additional analyses to identify the elements of present and alternative job utility that are the most salient for IT professionals' quitting processes. From the additional analyses, we derive specific guidance to practice on the management of IT professionals. View full abstract»

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  • An Empirical Assessment of Second Life vis-à-vis Chatroom on Media Perceptual Assessment and Actual Task Performance

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 379 - 390
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1542 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The contribution of media in fostering communications and exchanges of idea is an enduring topic of investigation. However, our review of existing theories on media and human cognition suggests that there remain taunting contradictions in their theoretical assumptions and postulations with regard to computer-mediated communication (CMC) usage. Specifically, the social presence theory postulates that a rich medium could better facilitate the communication activity by promoting a greater “awareness” of the communicating party, which may then lead to better task performance. Yet, a richer medium could also distract an individual's focus of attention as suggested by the cognitive theory of distraction-conflict. To reconcile these contradicting perspectives, this study conducted an empirical comparison of two CMC tools, i.e., Second Life and online chatroom, in terms of users' perceptions of the media and their actual task performance in these media. The results suggest that a rich medium, such as Second Life, could lead to better perceptual evaluations of users in terms of telepresence, curiosity arousal, and immersion in media. However, the use of a lean medium, such as chatroom, could lead to better task performance in terms of users' recall ability, and the quality of ideas generated during the mediated interactions. Implications for research and practice are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • A DEA–Tobit Analysis to Understand the Role of Experience and Task Factors in the Efficiency of Software Engineers

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 391 - 400
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (477 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This study employs the data-envelopment analysis (DEA)-Tobit regression approach to analyze data from a leading software engineering organization to gain insights regarding the role of various types of technical experience and task factors in the efficiency of personnel assigned to software tasks. “Efficiency” follows a holistic-view definition as the quality and productivity achieved from the overall personnel experience, and it is evaluated with DEA. Then, a Tobit regression model is employed to determine the effect that various types of technical experience and task factors have on the DEA efficiency scores. Although the DEA-Tobit technique has been applied to various areas within the management science and operations research fields, it has not yet been presented as a general evaluation tool within the software-engineering field to understand drivers of software quality and productivity. We demonstrate how DEA-Tobit fills a gap not addressed by commonly applied methods in the literature. View full abstract»

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  • Process Innovativeness and Firm Performance in Technology Service Firms: The Effect of External and Internal Contingencies

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 401 - 414
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (465 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Innovativeness is the capability for innovation or the ability to innovate, and has been acknowledged as a key organizational capability. Process innovativeness is considered as an organization's capability to marshal, integrate, and leverage organizational resources to improve or create new processes. Researchers have noted that though growth in the service sector has been strong in recent years, research on innovation in service processes is sparse. Further, as information and communication technologies become an important component of many service firms' offerings, there is a growing need for research on service firms offering technology intensive services, i.e., technology service firms (TSFs). TSFs may be defined as firms that sell or provide technology in the form of management consultations, evaluations, tests, analyses, maintenance, purchasing advice, studies, designs, plans, and other artifacts. Our research, therefore, examines the relationship between process innovativeness and firm performance in TSFs. Using contingency theory arguments, our model proposes that environmental hostility (external contingency) and aggressive posture (internal contingency) moderate the relationship between process innovativeness and performance in TSFs. Based on data from 108 firms, our results show that firm performance in TSFs is positively related to process innovativeness. Further, we find that while environmental hostility has a moderating effect on the relationship of process innovativeness with TSF performance, no such relationship is found with aggressive posture. View full abstract»

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  • A Quantitative Evaluation of Concurrent Product Development Effectiveness Theories

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 415 - 427
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (344 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We suggest new directions for research on the effectiveness of concurrent product development. These models relate overlapping or functional integration to performance using analytical, simulation, or statistical methods. By collecting quantitative data from 82 research articles, we ascertain the percentage of a methodology's models that have incorporated each of certain significant theoretical features. We then use this information to recommend important underutilized features and a comprehensive theory that integrates the features. Analytical and simulation modelers could make more use of functional integration, while statistical modelers could attend more to overlapping, rework, and the constituent phases of the development process. Then, in finding a subset of interrelated features appearing simultaneously in a majority of a methodology's models, we identify a core theory upon which models in the mainstream build. Next, our study offers specific mutual learning suggestions through which modeling efforts in any one methodology might facilitate modeling efforts in another methodology. Analytical and simulation modelers could study the reluctance to transmit and use preliminary information, while statistical researchers could develop dynamic models. Finally, the study provides a template for researchers willing to apply our evaluation methods to other areas. View full abstract»

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  • Antecedents and Consequences of New Product Development Practices and Software Tools: An Exploratory Study

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 428 - 442
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1087 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Many development practices and software tools enable new product development (NPD), yet few empirical studies shed light on the project characteristics and project contexts driving their use. Using a cross-sectional sample of NPD projects, this study examines how project characteristics and availability of information technology (IT) infrastructure relate to the use of NPD practices and software tools. We also examine how the extent of their use is associated with NPD project performance. The results indicate that different project characteristics influence the use of NPD practices and software tools, with project complexity associated with software tool use, but project uncertainty associated with NPD practice use. Also, customer facing IT infrastructure is associated with the use of NPD practices, while manufacturing plant IT infrastructure is associated with the use of design/validation software tools. Moreover, use of NPD practices has a positive association with all project-level performance metrics examined in this study, and as a result, a greater impact on overall market success. In comparison, the performance impacts of software tools appear relatively limited, with only design/validation software tools exhibiting a strong positive association with product performance quality and a weak positive association with time-to-market and responsiveness. Communication/teamwork software tools exhibit no such impact. View full abstract»

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  • The Impact of Supply Chain Integration on Mass Customization Capability: An Extended Resource-Based View

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 443 - 456
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (412 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This study investigates two key issues: 1) how internal integration, customer integration, supplier integration, and the interplay among them jointly influence the development of mass customization capability (MCC), and 2) how environmental conditions (i.e., demand uncertainty and competitive intensity) moderate the impacts of supply chain integration on this development. Based on the extended resource-based view (ERBV) of the firm and contingency theory, we build a conditional indirect model and test it using a dataset of 289 manufacturers from nine countries. Our results are consistent with the ERBV, showing that internal integration not only has a significant direct effect on MCC, but also plays a central and strategic role in building customer and supplier integration. However, although customer integration is found to improve MCC directly, supplier integration appears to have no significant impact. Finally, internal integration has a positive indirect effect on MCC through customer integration, and this indirect effect is amplified when demand is uncertain and competition is intense. View full abstract»

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  • A Quality-Distinction Model of IT Capabilities: Conceptualization and Two-Stage Empirical Validation Using CMMi Processes

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 457 - 469
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (649 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we develop a model of information technology (IT) service provider capabilities termed the quality distinction (QD) model that is theoretically rooted in the resource-based view and quality management literatures, and operationalized using the widely used capability maturity model (CMM) framework. The QD model is theorized to consist of one dynamic capability (i.e., process adaptation capability) and three operational capabilities (i.e., life cycle, prevention quality, and appraisal quality capabilities). These four capabilities are initially operationalized using definitions of the 22 processes in the CMM integration framework. A panel of experts is used to assign the 22 processes to the four capabilities in the QD model. Rigorous scale-refinement procedures are used and 15 CMM processes are retained as a result. Survey data collected from IT service providers are, then, used to compare the theorized QD model with the staged and continuous models in the CMM framework. Results from a covariance-based structural equation modeling analysis provide good support to the hypothesis that the QD model is superior to the two CMM models (the staged and continuous representations), with the theorized model showing high fit indices and high psychometric properties. Results also provide support for the hypothesis that processes should be operationalized as routines with a combination of both ostensive and performative aspects. View full abstract»

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  • Antecedents and Consequences of Political Behavior in New Product Development Teams

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 470 - 482
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (425 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    According to the political perspective on strategic decision making, political decisions are the results of a process in which the preferences of the most powerful dominate over those of the less powerful. The conceptualization of political behavior accounts for issues, such as negotiation, bargaining, and power, which are central to this perspective. Since strategic decisions during the new product development (NPD) process are made by team members, they are a mass of action, interaction, and counteraction. This means that the strategic decision-making process during NPD can be subject to political behavior. This study extends research on political behavior into the realm of NPD teams by examining the impact of six contextual variables (project importance, project uncertainty, project motive, trust, functional diversity, and demographic diversity) associated with two types of context (project and team environment) on the practice of political behavior in NPD teams. The study also examines the impact of political behavior on speed to market considering the moderating impact of environmental turbulence. Using primary and cross-sectional data obtained from 103 Turkish NPD teams, our results showed that project importance, project motive, and functional diversity significantly influence political behavior. Interestingly, our results indicated that political behavior positively influences speed to market. We present and discuss our empirical results, provide implications for both theory and practice, and discuss research limitations. View full abstract»

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  • Predicting Change Propagation and Impact on Design Schedule Due to External Changes

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 483 - 493
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1353 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Design projects often face changes from external sources causing redesign to many interdependent downstream activities. Depicting change propagation on the downstream activities and subsequent impact on design completion is a great challenge. This paper proposes a change propagation model to predict the change propagation on the downstream activities due to different degrees of change that might be initiated at different stages during a design project. The initiated change may cause change of different degrees to its immediate successors. The probability values of the change form a transition matrix for each dependency. The proposed model utilizes these transition matrices to depict the change propagation at the downstream. The change propagation model is then integrated with the scheduling model to schedule the propagated changes and to assess the overall impact on design completion and redesign (or loss in productivity). The effectiveness of the integrated model has been described with an illustrative case example. Such prediction and quantification of change impact would help project managers take the necessary actions for a proposed change. View full abstract»

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  • A Novel CMII-Based Engineering Change Management Framework: An Example in Taiwan's Motorcycle Industry

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 494 - 505
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (798 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In today's competitive marketplace, improving the management of engineering changes in new product development can reduce enterprise costs, shorten development times, and improve product quality. While previous studies have proposed engineering change management frameworks, these were based on deficient engineering change management standards. More importantly, these studies failed to apply engineering change management standards within specific industries. This study presents a novel engineering change management framework based on Configuration Management II (CMII) standards and industrial applications. This framework considers the addition of full-track or fast-track processes to solve fundamental product functionality or quality problems within a specific industry. To evaluate the effectiveness of this novel CMII-based engineering change management framework, this study applies the framework in a case study of a major Taiwan motorcycle manufacturer. Finally, we present the performance evaluation-based results of this framework and discuss the value of its managerial guidelines and implications. View full abstract»

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  • Journal subscription information [IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 506
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  • Forthcoming Engineering Management Related Conferences

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 507
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  • Papers to be Published in Future Issues of IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 508 - 509
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  • August 2012 IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management - readership survey

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 510 - 511
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  • IEEE Xplore Digital Library [advertisement]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 512
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  • IEEE Engineering Management Society Information

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): C3
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  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management information for authors

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): C4
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Aims & Scope

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E. 

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Rajiv Sabherwal
Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas