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Wireless Communications, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date June 2012

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • IEEE Wireless Communications - Front cover

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Wireless technologies for smart grid [Message from the Editor-in-Chief]

    Page(s): 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Scanning the literature

    Page(s): 3 - 5
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Results from the 2012 World Radiocommunication Conference [Spectrum Policy and Regulatory Issues]

    Page(s): 6 - 7
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Interference management in LTE wireless networks [Industry Perspectives]

    Page(s): 8 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (81 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    LTE and related technologies could bring the wireless broadband to unprecedented performance levels. The inter-cell interference, however, is the major impediment against further performance improvement of a LTE system. We have listed and discussed major challenges in ICI mitigation in LTE as well as emerging technological solutions that could address these challenges. With the continued increase in the wireless traffic demand, we believe that interference management will be a vibrant research area that will attract significant research efforts from both industry and academia. View full abstract»

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  • Reviews of "multi-gigabit microwave and milimeter-wave wireless communication" (wells, j.; 2010) and "wireless sensor networks: a networking perspective" (zheng, j. and jamalipour, a.; 2009) [book reviews]

    Page(s): 10 - 11
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  • Recent advances in wireless technologies for smart grid [Guest Editorial]

    Page(s): 12 - 13
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  • Multiagent coordination in microgrids via wireless networks

    Page(s): 14 - 22
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (271 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The future smart grid is expected to be an integration of intelligent microgrids featured by localized electricity generation, storage, and consumption. Wireless communication is a promising means to facilitate pervasive microgrid monitoring and control at a high flexibility and low deployment cost. In order to avoid a single point of failure, multiagent system (MAS) based decentralized microgrid control is widely considered. In this article, we present a consensus theory based multiagent coordination scheme for information discovery in microgrids via wireless networks. The information discovery process is fully distributed such that each agent only needs to communicate with its direct neighbors. The multiagent coordination is investigated in the presence of interference due to wireless transmissions. Specifically, the communication links among multiple agents may not be established simultaneously to avoid transmission collisions. In order to assure the accuracy of the information discovered by each agent, the convergence of the multiagent coordination is studied. We present the mechanism and principles for the multiagent coordination to achieve convergence in a microgrid via wireless network based on the characteristics of the information to be discovered. Three protocols with different complexities are proposed for normal microgrid operation, which can be readily implemented to off-the-shelf wireless communication devices. The protocols are further extended to achieve microgrid fault recovery by restricting the information exchange in a disconnected region to improve recovery speed. The performance of the proposed protocols is evaluated via a case study based on the network topology and configuration of a realistic microgrid test system. Open research issues and directions are outlined. View full abstract»

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  • Impact of wireless communication delay on load sharing among distributed generation systems through smart microgrids

    Page(s): 24 - 29
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (477 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Load sharing among distributed generation systems (DGS) is one of the most important topics in wireless-enabled smart microgrids, where a set of power inverters at different geographical locations work coordinately and collaboratively through wireless networks to meet the load requirement. Parallel power inverters operated in distributed generation systems rely on the underlying wireless communication channels to exchange power information among them for load sharing control. However, existing work in the area of load sharing has largely ignored the effect of wireless communication delay. Study has shown that the time-varying wireless communication delay may have a significant impact on the performance of power inverters. In this work, we aim to fill this gap and study the performance of distributed power inverters under the scenario of wireless-enabled smart microgrids. We first study the power inverter performance by taking into account the time-varying wireless communication delay. Then, we propose an optimal controller to overcome the delay problem and to provide a smooth load sharing performance. Both theoretical and simulation results show the effectiveness and responsiveness of the proposed controller design. View full abstract»

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  • Suresense: sustainable wireless rechargeable sensor networks for the smart grid

    Page(s): 30 - 36
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (762 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The electrical power grid has recently been embracing the advances in Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) for the sake of improving efficiency, safety, reliability and sustainability of electrical services. For a reliable smart grid, accurate, robust monitoring and diagnosis tools are essential. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are promising candidates for monitoring the smart grid, given their capability to cover large geographic regions at low-cost. On the other hand, limited battery lifetime of the conventional WSNs may create a performance bottleneck for the long-lasting smart grid monitoring tasks, especially considering that the sensor nodes may be deployed in hard to reach, harsh environments. In this context, recent advances in Radio Frequency (RF)-based wireless energy transfer can increase sustainability of WSNs and make them operationally ready for smart grid monitoring missions. RF-based wireless energy transfer uses Electromagnetic (EM) waves and it operates in the same medium as the data communication protocols. In order to achieve timely and efficient charging of the sensor nodes, we propose the Sustainable wireless Rechargeable Sensor network (SuReSense). SuReSense employs mobile chargers that charge multiple sensors from several landmark locations. We propose an optimization model to select the minimum number of landmarks according to the locations and energy replenishment requirements of the sensors. View full abstract»

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  • Reliability analysis and redundancy design of smart grid wireless communications system for demand side management

    Page(s): 38 - 46
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (273 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To ensure efficient, continuous, and secure operation of the next generation smart power grid, the reliability of its data communications system, and in particular, the wireless communications system will be crucial. In this article, we present a reliability analysis of the wireless communications system in the smart grid to support demand-side management (DSM). The availability performance, which is the probability that the wireless connectivity between a smart meter to the meter data-management system (MDMS) is available, is obtained given the random failure of the system devices. This availability measure is then used to calculate the cost of power-demand estimation error and damage of power distribution equipment if its failure cannot be reported. At this end, redundancy design approaches are presented to minimize the cost of failure as well as the cost of deployment of the wireless communications system in the smart grid. View full abstract»

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  • Overview of demand management in smart grid and enabling wireless communication technologies

    Page(s): 48 - 56
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (845 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    There are significant challenges as well as great opportunities for research at both policy and technology levels on the efficient use of energy. Most existing power generation and distribution systems are based on a century old mechanism where power grids are managed by vertically integrated utilities. Intelligent power grids known as smart grids are required as the demand for energy continues to grow and more and more emphasis is being placed on the supply of renewable energy. The main ingredient of smart grids is the integration of information and communication technology (ICT) into the grids to monitor and regulate power generation and demand. This article provides an overview of demand management with a particular focus on the necessary enabling wireless technologies. Various mechanisms and algorithms for the optimal demand management in smart grids using these wireless technologies are also reviewed. View full abstract»

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  • A wireless smart grid testbed in lab

    Page(s): 58 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1651 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    State-of-the-art Smart Grid design needs innovation in a number of dimensions: distributed and dynamic network with two-way information and energy transmission, seamless integration of renewable energy sources, management of intermittent power supplies, realtime demand response, and energy pricing strategy. To realize these, we have designed SmartGridLab, a wireless Smart Grid testbed to help the Smart Grid research community analyze and evaluate their designs and developed protocols in a lab environment. View full abstract»

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  • Secure wireless monitoring and control systems for smart grid and smart home

    Page(s): 66 - 73
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (334 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Secure and efficient communication between human being and managed devices is critical for Smart Grid and Smart Home. This article considers the architecture and design of a secure access gateway (SAG) for home area networks. The SAG serves as the interface between the remote users and the managed devices, such that real-time secure monitoring and control of the devices can be achieved through a Smart Phone. We try to address the security and capacity challenges using multilayer techniques. Security enhancement is ensured through network layer protocol development, as well as inherently secure physical layer transceiver design. Capacity improvement is achieved using dynamic resource management. Remote monitoring and control of home/office devices through a Smart Phone is coming closer to us more than ever before. View full abstract»

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  • On the negative selection and the danger theory inspired security for heterogeneous networks

    Page(s): 74 - 84
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (299 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Aspirations for a boundless communication paradigm for future generation networks have changed the conventional way of looking at network security. With such a vision, security techniques should not only be securing local end-users but also be protecting entire networks from malicious adversaries. Unfortunately, providing security protection for such gigantic networks is a very challenging task. Based on the analogous relationships of various cell interactions in a metabolic network and a complex heterogeneous network, we explore the possibilities of human immune system (HIS) inspired anomaly detection for protecting interworked heterogeneous networks. In light of this, the applicability of two key schools of thought on how the HIS detects anomalies; namely, the Negative Selection (NS) and the Danger Theory (DT) are discussed in this article. While the NS theory is the traditional understanding of anomaly detection in the HIS, the DT is a radical new concept that challenges the main fundamentals of the NS theory, which is currently being hotly debated among immunologists. Based on this, the article highlights the applicability and the limitations of these two theories in detecting malicious anomalies in heterogeneous networks. From our analysis, we establish a doctrine that the DT outperforms its counterpart (the NS theory) in detecting anomalies in a complex heterogeneous network. Our analysis also indicates that the DT inspired anomaly detection is efficient in detecting malicious network adversaries and updating network segments that are under attack, thereby increasing the survivability of heterogeneous networks. View full abstract»

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  • Interference management in OFDMA femtocell networks: issues and approaches

    Page(s): 86 - 95
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (293 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    One of the effective techniques of improving the coverage and enhancing the capacity and data rate in cellular wireless networks is to reduce the cell size (i.e., cell splitting) and transmission distances. Therefore, the concept of deploying femtocells over macrocell has recently attracted growing interests in academia, industry, and standardization forums. Various technical challenges towards mass deployment of femtocells have been addressed in recent literature. Interference mitigation between neighboring femtocells and between the femtocell and macrocell is considered to be one of the major challenges in femtocell networks because femtocells share the same licensed frequency spectrum with macrocell. Further, the conventional radio resource management techniques for hierarchical cellular system is not suitable for femtocell networks since the positions of the femtocells are random depending on the users' service requirement. In this article, we provide a survey of the different state-of-the-art approaches for interference and resource management in orthogonal frequency-division multiple access (OFDMA)-based femtocell networks. A qualitative comparison among the different approaches is provided. To this end, open challenges in designing interference management schemes for OFDMA femtocell networks are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Operator controlled device-to-device communications in LTE-advanced networks

    Page(s): 96 - 104
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (507 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article studies direct communications between user equipments in the LTE-advanced cellular networks. Different from traditional device-to-device communication technologies such as Bluetooth and WiFi-direct, the operator controls the communication process to provide better user experience and make profit accordingly. The related usage cases and business models are analyzed. Some technical considerations are discussed, and a resource allocation and data transmission procedure is provided. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Wireless Communications Magazine deals with all technical and policy issues related to personalization, location-independent communications in all media.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Hsiao-Hwa Chen
Cheng Kung University, Taiwan