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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 11 • Date Nov. 1993

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • Heating and cooling battery electric vehicles-the final barrier

    Page(s): 9 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (644 KB)  

    Battery electric vehicles (EVs) present a particular challenge to the development of more efficient and effective heating and cooling systems for automotive applications. Because heating-ventilating-air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are electrically powered, vehicle range is reduced when the HVAC system is operating. The alternative solutions to HVAC battery electric vehicles are identified and evaluated. These include a basis for determining HVAC boundary design assumptions and showing mathematical methods for estimating the HVAC load and energy requirements, and evaluation of the new European and Japanese approaches to wintertime heating, such as NaS battery, motor and component waste heat recovery, electric seat warmer, radiant foot warmer, electric windshield and backlight defrost, molten salt latent heat storage, metal hydride hydrogen storage and catalytic heater, and liquid fueled heater.<> View full abstract»

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  • The development of a series hybrid electric vehicle for near-term applications

    Page(s): 15 - 20
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (619 KB)  

    The design of a feasible hybrid electric vehicle for use in near-term applications is presented. The challenge involved cost effectiveness, acceleration, range, safety, and emissions, which were incorporated into the vehicle design. The relationship of the design goals was studied, and compromises were made to provide near-optimal system design. This process resulted in the selection and design of the major vehicle components. The design decisions and the actual vehicle components are reviewed.<> View full abstract»

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  • Fuel cell technology status

    Page(s): 21 - 27
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (771 KB)  

    Several major fuel cell projects and their status are described. The fuel cell types discussed are phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, solid oxide, and polymer. One of the technologies is very close to commercialization. Two others offer the possibility for higher efficiency and large capacity electric generation using coal. Still another may be the answer to the key issues facing the transportation sector.<> View full abstract»

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  • The capital, energy, and time economics of an automated, on-demand transportation system

    Page(s): 28 - 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (542 KB)  

    Many transit and rail planners believe that the only way to decrease the capital and operating cost of rail and transit systems is to decrease the size and weight of the vehicles. The authors discuss the requirements of such a downsized transportation system and the benefits to be gained by decreasing the size of the operational vehicles. Not only can the capital and operating cost of the system be dramatically decreased, but the operational requirements of a system involving the use of smaller vehicles permits its use as an on-demand system, further increasing system utility to the passenger and system operator. The capital cost, energy economics, and the economics of the CyberTran transportation system are reviewed.<> View full abstract»

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  • Tests of a full-sized mechanically rechargeable zinc-air battery in an electric vehicle

    Page(s): 34 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (464 KB)  

    A mechanically rechargeable zinc-air battery that has high power density and fast refueling capability is described. The battery is built from modules of 32 or 44 cells connected in series, and the modules can be arranged in any combination of series and parallel connections, and in practical quantity, according to the requirements of the vehicle, motor, and controller. The results of laboratory and in-vehicle tests of a zinc-air battery consisting of two 32-cell modules connected in series, with nominal voltage of 75 V and nominal capacity of 216 Ah, are presented.<> View full abstract»

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  • Total life-cycle cost analysis of conventional and alternative fueled vehicles

    Page(s): 39 - 43
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (482 KB)  

    Total life-cycle cost (TLCC) analysis can indicate whether paying higher capital costs for advanced technology with low operating and environmental costs is advantageous over paying lower capital costs for conventional technology with higher operating and environment costs. A TLCC model that was developed to facilitate consideration of the various factors involved in both individual and societal policy decision making is summarized. The model considers capital, operating, salvage, and environmental costs for cars, vans, and buses using conventional and alternative fuels. The model has been developed to operate on a personal computer platform using a commercial spreadsheet program.<> View full abstract»

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  • Space propulsion: the antimatter advantage

    Page(s): 44 - 46
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    It is suggested that, based upon current research, there exist several possibilities for future propulsion techniques. Some of the most promising research deals with antimatter and its usefulness in energy production. The potential of antimatter as an efficient and renewable energy source is discussed. The design of an antimatter propulsion system is described.<> View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
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