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Power and Energy Magazine, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date July-Aug. 2012

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • Front Cover

    Page(s): C1
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  • Table of Contents

    Page(s): 1
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  • Society Listing

    Page(s): 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Smart Grid Technology: A Global Approach to Its Challenges [From the Editor]

    Page(s): 4 - 6
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  • Share Your Thoughts: Send Comments to m.olken@ieee.org [Letters to the Editor]

    Page(s): 8 - 18
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  • Information Investments: A View from the Division VII Director [Leader's Corner]

    Page(s): 20
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Big Picture: Smart Research for Large-Scale Integrated Smart Grid Solutions

    Page(s): 22 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4287 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article represents an edited version of opinions expressed in an extensive white paper created by many individuals associated with the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC) of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and posted on PSERC's Web site, www.pserc. org. The four tasks described above are considered crucial to smart grid R&D, demonstration, and eventual deployment. As learning and innovation occur during the course of a demonstration, changes may be needed in the architecture, the components, and the way they are integrated operationally. The goal is to acquire the best information possible for the eventual decisions on whether and how an integrated smart grid solution should be implemented, so adjusting demonstrations as needed to provide that information is very appropriate. It is also important that demonstrations be designed and implemented to gain the knowledge needed for a system wide deployment of a smart grid. The bulk transmission system should be included in the design. There are a great number of unknowns in moving toward the national goal of a low-carbon economy. That uncertainty can be reduced by effectively designed large-scale demonstrations drawing on the results of prior R&D efforts. View full abstract»

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  • Beyond the Crystal Ball: Locational Marginal Price Forecasting and Predictive Operations in U.S. Power Markets

    Page(s): 35 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (894 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Signs are emerging that north american power markets are moving toward commonality and maturity in their function, if not their operations. More than ten years after the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) announced its Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) on standard market design (SMD), major U.S. power markets now seem to have a basis on which to voluntarily provide similar pricing granularity and hedging capabilities to their participants. View full abstract»

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  • See It Fast to Keep Calm: Real-Time Voltage Control Under Stressed Conditions

    Page(s): 43 - 55
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3199 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As the electrical utility industry addresses energy and environmental needs through greater use of renewable energy, storage, and other technologies, power systems are becoming more complex and stressed. Increased dynamic changes that require improvements in real-time monitoring, protection, and control increase the complexity of managing modern grids. In an effort to ensure the secure operation of power systems, more attention is being given to voltage management. Voltage management includes addressing voltage stability and fault-induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR) phenomena. Deployment of phasor measurement unit (PMU) technology, in combination with recently developed methodologies for tracking voltage behavior, has resulted in improved real-time voltage monitoring, protection, and control. View full abstract»

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  • The Power to Deliver: Trends in Smart Grid Solutions

    Page(s): 56 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1655 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Looking at the communication industry, one observes how drastically the communication horizon has changed. From letters to e-mails and SMS, from phone calls to video chat and live conferencing, from phone booths to smart phones: since the digitization of communication, a new era of consumer choice has been inaugurated. The potential exists for similar transformation and opportunity in the provision of electricity, embodied in a concept known as the “smart grid”. Smart grid is the electric delivery network from electrical generation to the end user that makes use of the latest advances in wireless communication and intelligent information management systems to ameliorate the electric system robustness, reliability, efficiency, and security. Like the telecommunications and the genesis of the Internet, technology holds the key to the smart grid and its realization. View full abstract»

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  • Strait Ahead: Toward a Sustainable, Economic, and Secure Electricity Supply in Singapore

    Page(s): 65 - 74
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2796 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article presents a number of initiatives conducted by Singapore government agencies, universities, and R&D centers and their results and progress so far toward achieving the goal of a sustainable, economic, and secure electricity supply system in Singapore. Certain problems encountered in executing these initiatives are discussed and reported, along with future plans. View full abstract»

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  • Look Before You Leap: The Role of Energy Storage in the Grid

    Page(s): 75 - 84
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1226 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A fundamental truth of the grid has been that electricity must be generated at the precise moment it is demanded. It is the ultimate “just in time” system, where the laws of physics prevent carrying inventory. This characterization is under challenge, as the development of large-scale energy storage technologies is accelerating. A growing group of engineers, grid operators, and regulatory agencies believe that energy storage will be a critical component of the “grid of the future.” Over the past several decades, large-scale hydro and pumped hydro storage facilities dominated the energy storage landscape. Today, new and evolving battery chemistries, primarily for electric vehicle and backup power applications, are emerging as potential solutions for some of the challenges that face the grid today. Both batteries and high-speed mechanical flywheels-connected to the grid through power electronics-are enabling smaller and more modular energy storage systems. These storage systems are being considered for a variety of applications, from time-shifting wind. View full abstract»

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  • In the Berkshires, Part 1: William Stanley Started Something [History]

    Page(s): 85 - 94
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3119 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A great deal has been written concerning the pioneering work of William Stanley in creating the first practical alternating current (ac) installation for lighting and power in the southern Berkshire County town of Great Barrington, Massachusetts, in 1886. View full abstract»

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  • Meet the Candidates: Division Director VII Elections [Society News]

    Page(s): 96
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  • In Memoriam: Richard (Dick) Farmer [Society News]

    Page(s): 98
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  • Correction

    Page(s): 99
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    In "Growing Pains," which appeared in the May 2012 issue [ibid., vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 59??66, 2012], some of the values in Table 1 were incorrect. The corrected table is presented. View full abstract»

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  • PES Meetings: For More Information, www.ieee.org/power [Calendar]

    Page(s): 100 - 102
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  • 2012 IEEE Power & Energy Society General Meeting

    Page(s): 101
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  • Smart Grid Adoption: Answers Found in a Strong Business Case [In My View]

    Page(s): 104 - 102
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (116 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Whether we call it the smart grid or not, modernization of the country's energy infrastructure has gained far more visibility in the last few years as a convergence of economic, regulatory, and political forces placed it front and center as a national priority. Just about all stakeholders with a vested interested in an updated grid understand that the process of grid transformation is ongoing and will continue to evolve as the industry strives to achieve higher efficiency and reliability. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Power & Energy Magazine is a bimonthly magazine dedicated to disseminating information on all matters of interest to electric power engineers and other professionals involved in the electric power industry.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Melvin I. Olken
molken@ieee.org