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Technology and Society Magazine, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date Summer 2012

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Displaying Results 1 - 20 of 20
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): C1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Table of contents]

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Staff listing]

    Page(s): 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Technology and Society Magazine is Going Green [SSIT BOG Message]

    Page(s): 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • International Symposium on Technology and Society 2012 (ISTAS 2012)

    Page(s): 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Idio-Technopolis [Editorial]

    Page(s): 5 - 12
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Sonic Persuasion: Reading Sound in the Recorded Age [Book Reviews]

    Page(s): 6 - 9
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Robert J. Whelchel to be Recognized with SSIT Distinguished Service Award [News and Notes]

    Page(s): 9
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Steve Jobs, Perfectionist [Book Reviews]

    Page(s): 10 - 12
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  • Uninhabited Systems in the Civilian Realm: Some Ethical Concerns [Commentary]

    Page(s): 13 - 16
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • SSIT Announces IEEE Barus Award to Environmental Engineer Marc Edwards [News and Notes]

    Page(s): 16
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  • The Scientific Revolution [Fiction]

    Page(s): 17 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (65 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Good evening good people of planet earth and welcome to the program! Tonight we are chatting with Sam Willis, founder and spokesperson for the new political party standing at this year's global election. They are calling themselves the “Intellectual” party and claiming to bring a shade of “White” to the political spectrum. Welcome to the program Sam! Perhaps you could begin by telling us a little bit about why the party started and what it's all about. View full abstract»

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  • Benefits and Harms [Guest Editor's Introduction]

    Page(s): 19
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  • Socially Beneficial Technology: Can It Be Achieved In Practice?

    Page(s): 20 - 27
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2141 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Is the effort of engineers to advance technology for social benefit worthwhile? One widely accepted definition of social benefit, the UN Declaration of Human Rights, includes several rights that depend to a greater or lesser extent on technology. On the face of it this validates the effort of engineers. Yet prominent economist Friedrich Hayek queried the very concept of social benefit. This gap between the engineering and economic perspectives is not widely recognized. While initially neutral on the purpose of economic activity, economist Michael Porter has taken a position supporting social benefit. View full abstract»

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  • Energy and Autonomous Urban Land Vehicles

    Page(s): 28 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (845 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Most of what has been written about the social implications of autonomous vehicles concerns military vehicles, particularly aerial vehicles [1]. By contrast, this paper addresses the effects that civilian urban land vehicles could have on energy consumption. When the military designs land vehicles, it assumes an unknown or hostile environment. If the infrastructure instead cooperates with the vehicles, and the routes are fully known, autonomy becomes much easier. View full abstract»

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  • Location-Based Social Networking: Impact on Trust in Relationships

    Page(s): 39 - 50
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1069 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Location-based social networking (LBSN) is a service that utilizes location information to facilitate social networking. LBSN applications allow users to view the locations of their “friends.” They also may allow users to view information about other users of LBSN applications that are located in proximity. Users invite their friends to participate in LBSN. A process of consent follows in which users provide permission for their location information to be viewed to varying levels of detail depending on their chosen settings. The manner in which LBSN applications work is illustrated simplistically in Fig. 1, although variations to this model exist. LBSN applications such as Loopt, Fire Eagle, Navizon, iPoki, Locago, ZinTin, iFob, WhosHere, and Google Latitude enhance a users ability to perform overt or covert social surveillance. These applications enable users to view and share real-time location information with their family and friends. With the emergence of this technology it is crucial to consider, as suggested by Kling [1], that “technology alone, even good technology alone is not sufficient to create social or economic value.” Further to not contributing “sufficient” economic or social value, Kling and other scholars, such as Kraut et al. [2], have identified that technologies can have negative impacts on society. View full abstract»

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  • Robotics, the New Industrial Revolution

    Page(s): 51 - 58
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (751 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Robots are becoming an important part of the “new social technology” defined by Hirai [1], where finding a robot in any environment is becoming more common. While we are used to finding robots in different environments such as supermarkets, nurseries (e.g., robotic pets), hospitals (e.g., for surgery), or at home (e.g., vacuuming robots), the environment that still has the most robots is industry (e.g., the automotive industry). For that reason, many studies are required to find the appropriate mechanisms to integrate robots at all levels of our society. We must consider issues from many perspectives, such as history, literature, economics, culture, technological developments, electronics, computers, or industry. The conclusions obtained will help us achieve the most positive and beneficial integration of robots with humans. View full abstract»

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  • Privacy Compliance Risks for Facebook

    Page(s): 59 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1173 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Facebook is an Internet and societal phenomenon. In just a few years it has claimed a significant proportion of the world's population as regular users, becoming by far the most dominant Online Social Network (OSN). With its success has come a good deal of controversy, especially over privacy. Does Facebook and its kin herald a true shift in privacy values, or despite occasional reckless revelations, are most users actually as reserved as ever? We argue it's too early to draw conclusions about society as a whole from the OSN experience to date. However, Facebook in particular brings a number of compliance risks in jurisdictions that have enacted modern Information Privacy Law. View full abstract»

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  • Scope of the Society on Social Implications of Technology

    Page(s): C3
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  • IEEE Society on Social Implications of Technology

    Page(s): C4
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Technology and Society Magazine covers the impact of technology (as embodied by the fields of interest in IEEE) on society

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Katina Michael
School of Information Systems and Technology
University of Wollongong