Scheduled System Maintenance:
On Monday, April 27th, IEEE Xplore will undergo scheduled maintenance from 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM ET (17:00 - 19:00 UTC). No interruption in service is anticipated.
By Topic

Sensors Journal, IEEE

Issue 8 • Date Aug. 2012

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 39
  • Front Cover

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): C1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (257 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2537 - 2538
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (121 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Numerical Study on the Transient Response of a Condenser Microphone

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2539 - 2547
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1020 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The vibrating of a condenser microphone diaphragm due to incident pressure causes changes in the capacitance and the energy stored in the volume of the microphone. One of the most important parameters that must be determined very precisely for any microphone is the amount of this displacement due to the executed pressure on the diaphragm i.e., mechanical sensitivity. Thus, in this paper, the generalized equations describing the motion of the diaphragm and the Reynolds equation for compressible gases have been solved in transient mode to determine with precision the mechanical response of the microphone. Unlike the past static and quasi dynamic simulations, the Reynolds equation that is used to calculate the damping and stiffness of the air near the diaphragm is considered in nonlinear form. The numerical frequency response obtained for a condenser microphone has been compared with experimental results that exist in the literature. The numerical results obtained indicate a very good accuracy of the code. The effect of the damping and stiffness coefficient on the frequency range, which is very important in designing a practical microphone, is also studied in detail. Such a dynamic analysis, unlike the past numerical static simulation, gives a deeper view into the reasons of the nonlinearity of this important measuring transducer. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Principal Component Analysis of Pulsed Eddy Current Response From Corrosion in Mild Steel

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2548 - 2553
    Cited by:  Papers (13)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (448 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The effect of corrosion under coatings on carbon steel is a complex mix of many factors, including electrical conductivity, magnetic permeability, surface roughness, and coating thickness variations, which all have to be taken into account when analysing the pulsed eddy current (PEC) response from corrosion. In this paper, the PEC nondestructive evaluation method has been applied to a set of mild steel plates with varying levels of corrosion and various surface preparations. The panels are exposed outdoors for the same time-period and then the surfaces prepared in different ways, resulting in four different corrosion grades in accordance with the surface preparation standards of the society for protective coatings. Using principal component analysis (PCA) on nonnormalized and normalized PEC response waveforms, the most dominant features are extracted and used to classify and characterize the samples. Normalization has been done in an attempt to mitigate the effects of magnetic permeability and lift-off variations across the samples. The distribution of the first principal component coefficients are then compared against other time-domain features of the PEC waveform to provide a physical explanation, and relate the changes to differences in the corrosion grade and other properties of the samples. Despite the complex nature of the samples, the results show that with the application of normalization and PCA, it is able to classify the samples into different corrosion grades. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Hot Wire Needle Probe for In-Reactor Thermal Conductivity Measurement

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2554 - 2560
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (750 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Thermal conductivity is a key property that must be known for proper design, test, and application of new fuels and structural materials in nuclear reactors. Thermal conductivity is highly dependent on the physical structure, chemical composition, and the state of the material. Typically, thermal conductivity changes that occur during irradiation are measured out-of-pile using a “cook and look” approach. Repeatedly removing samples from a test reactor to measurements is expensive, has the potential to disturb phenomena of interest, and only provides understanding of the sample's end state when each measurement is made. There are also limited thermophysical property data for advanced fuels. Such data are needed for simulation design codes, the development of next generation reactors, and advanced fuels for existing nuclear plants. Being able to quickly characterize fuel thermal conductivity during irradiation can improve the fidelity of data, reduce costs of post-irradiation examinations, increase understanding of how fuels behave under irradiation, and confirm or improve existing thermal conductivity measurement techniques. This paper discusses efforts to develop and evaluate an in-pile thermal conductivity sensor based on a hot wire needle probe. Testing has been performed on samples with thermal conductivities ranging from 0.2 to 22 W/m·K at temperatures ranging from 20 °C to 600 °C. Thermal conductivity values measured using the needle probe match data found in the literature to within 5% for samples tested at room temperature, 6% for low thermal conductivity samples tested at high temperatures, and 10% for high thermal conductivity samples tested at high temperatures. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • High-Performance Ultraviolet Photodetector Based on Polycrystalline {\rm SrTiO}_{3} Thin Film

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2561 - 2564
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1367 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    SrTiO3 (STO) thin film has been fabricated on fused-quartz wafer by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The Ag interdigited electrodes were then evaporated on STO thin film in order to form the metal-insulator-metal photoconductive detector. Our photodetector exhibits a high photoresponse in the range of 225-340 nm with an ultraviolet-visible rejection ratio (R310 nm/R400 nm) of two orders of magnitude, indicating an intrinsic characteristic of visible-blindness. The maximum photocurrent responsivity is about 105 mA/W measured at 310 nm and the corresponding quantum efficiency is 42.1%. The dark current is only 0.4 nA at 50 V bias. Furthermore, the STO thin film detector presents a transient photovoltaic signal with a rise time of ~330 ps and a fall time of ~480 ps under the excitation of a 355-nm-pulsed laser, suggesting an ultrafast response characteristic of our STO thin film detector. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Compact Submillimeter/Terahertz Gas Sensor With Efficient Gas Collection, Preconcentration, and ppt Sensitivity

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2565 - 2574
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1824 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Although heretofore unrealized, it has long been known the rotational fingerprints of gases that occupy the submillimeter/terahertz (SMM/THz) spectral region can provide a basis for analytical systems with unique gas detection, identification, and quantification capabilities. Among these capabilities are near absolute specificity, even in complex mixtures, quantitative analysis, and excellent sensitivity to small samples. This paper describes such a system, self-contained in a 1 cu. ft. package. This system combines modern SMM/THz technology, sorbents to capitalize on the small sample requirements of the spectroscopic technique, and modern computational power to use the information contained in the complex rotational fingerprints. Moreover, the system and approach described show a clear path to future sensor systems that can be even smaller and more robust, as well as very inexpensive. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • 60-GHz Near-Field Six-Port Microscope Using a Scanning Slit Probe for Subsurface Sensing

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2575 - 2576
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (360 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A new six-port based near-field millimeter-wave microscope using a scanning slit probe is proposed for subsurface sensing applications. The combination of a six-port reflectometer and a slit probe presents a viable and promising alternative to the costly heterodyne principle. The system presents advantages such as compactness, robustness, and low cost. To evaluate its performance, the spatial resolution is experimentally verified. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Swarm Intelligence for Sensor Selection Problems

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2577 - 2585
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (450 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we apply the binary particle swarm optimization to the problem of selecting sensors from a set of sensors for the purpose of minimizing the error in parameter estimation. The motivation of selecting sensors rather than utilizing all sensors includes computational efficiency of parameter estimation and also the efficiency of energy consumption of sensor operations. The computational complexity of finding an optimal subset through exhaustive search can grow exponentially with the number ( and ) of sensors. If and are large, then it is not practical to solve this problem by evaluating all possible subsets of sensors. In addition to applying the general binary particle swarm optimization (BPSO) to the sensor selection problem, we also present a specific improvement to this population-based heuristic algorithm, namely, we use cyclical shifts to construct the members of the initial population, with the intention of reducing the average convergence time (the number of iterations until reaching an acceptable solution). The proposed BPSO for the sensor selection problem is computationally efficient, and its performance is verified through simulation results. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Spectrum Reconstruction for On-Chip Spectrum Sensor Array Using a Novel Blind Nonuniformity Correction Method

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2586 - 2592
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (841 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Filter-array spectrum sensors have been a promising structure that can be used to realize miniature spectrometers or spectrometers on-a-chip. By using multiple spectrum sensors with different spectral responses, the spectrum of a measurement object can be characterized. However, due to the low-cost and miniature design of the input optic interfaces, the intensity of the input light shining onto the imager of the sensor array may not be uniform. This unmodeled input nonuniformity could lead to a severe distortion in the spectrum measurement. Although the input nonuniformity can be alleviated by introducing dedicated input optic interface, we are interested in tackling this issue from an algorithmic perspective because 1) dedicated optics could still render 5%-10% intensity variation, and 2) the cost of computation power in electronics is potentially much lower than the cost of optics nowadays. Accordingly, we propose an iterative blind correction algorithm to solve the input light nonuniformity issue. The algorithm is based on the assumption that variation of input light intensity shall change smoothly, and hence requires no additional information. With the proposed iterative blind correction algorithm, significant improvement on the quality of spectrum reconstruction is obtained in both simulation and experimental studies. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Temperature Sensing Based on Ethanol-Filled Photonic Crystal Fiber Modal Interferometer

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2593 - 2597
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (677 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A modal interferometer made of a short ethanol-filled photonic crystal fiber (PCF) combined with a fully collapsed splicing with single-mode fibers (SMFs) is proposed for temperature measurement. Two fully collapsed splicing regions between the ethanol-filled PCF and SMFs excite and recombine two interfering modes in the ethanol-filled PCF. The interference spectrum of the ethanol-filled PCF is more sensitive to temperature than that of original PCF. By monitoring one peak wavelength shift of the ethanol-filled PCF modal interference spectrum, the temperature sensitivity reaches up to -0.35 nm/°C for a 3.25-cm long ethanol-filled PCF. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Tapered Single-Mode Optical Fiber pH Sensor Based on Lossy Mode Resonances Generated by a Polymeric Thin-Film

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2598 - 2603
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (773 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Lossy mode resonances can be generated with certain polymeric nanostructures, such as those obtained with a multilayered assembly of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and poly(acrylic acid). This coating is adsorbed by the electro-static self-assembly technique onto a tapered single-mode optical fiber, in order to evaluate its performance when detecting pH. According to the results reported in this paper, the high sensitivity given by a tapering process in a single-mode optical fiber is increased by the effect of this kind of electromagnetic resonances. Particularly, in a pH range from 4.0 to 6.0, the overall wavelength shift of this sensor reaches 200 nm, and the transmission at the resonance wavelengths can fall down to -50 dB. These data provide results which can be taken into account to detect pH with high accuracy. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Closed-Form Direction Finding Using Collocated but Orthogonally Oriented Higher Order Acoustic Sensors

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2604 - 2608
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (334 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper introduces new closed-form formulas to estimate an incident source's azimuth-elevation angle-of-arrival, for various combinations of higher order directional acoustic sensors, that are orthogonally oriented in a collocated triad. Also identified are the validity regions for un ambiguous estimation of the azimuth-elevation arrival-angle. These new direction-finding formulas may be used in the open literature's eigen-structure-based direction-finding algorithms, originally designed for (first-order) acoustic particle-velocity sensors. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Micro-Optical Gyroscope Using a PANDA Ring Resonator

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2609 - 2613
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (817 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We propose a new system of a micro-optical gyroscope (MOG) using a micro-embedded system. This system is comprised of a modified add/drop filter known as a PANDA ring resonator, which can be applied to navigate the direction with 3-D axes. The optical total path length of a MOG has been expanded by mean of an enhanced ring or PANDA ears. Simulation results obtained have shown that the precision signal at the phase difference of rotation orbit (straight line, ellipse, circle, etc.,) as a function of the inertial rotation rate Ω based on the Sagnac effect is achieved. The dependence of the transmission characteristics of the PANDA ring on the coupling coefficients of directional couplers is studied. The mathematical model of the system is analyzed and simulated. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Temperature and Strain Independent Modal Interferometric Torsion Sensor Using Photonic Crystal Fiber

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2614 - 2615
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (618 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An all-fiber modal interferometric torsion sensor based on simple splicing configuration is presented wherein a photonic crystal fiber is spliced in between multimode fiber and single mode fiber. Appreciable torsion sensitivity of ~79.83 pm/° is obtained in the long dynamic range of 180°. It is also found that there is no effect of strain and temperature on torsion sensitivity in the range of 0-4500 με and 30-200°C, respectively, leading to zero cross-sensitivity of torsion with strain and temperature. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Sensing Capabilities Based on Dielectric Electro Active Polymers—Feasibility and Potential State-of-the-Art Application

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2616 - 2624
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (984 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents the work in the area of sensing, using smart materials, more specific dielectric electro active polymers (DEAPs). Sensing is one of the main trio-characteristics of DEAPs; the trio-formations as applicable uses are actuator, transducer, and finally sensor. It is noted that one of the main value propositions whenever DEAP material is used, is the dual characteristics as the sensing/actuating capability. In the following work, the DEAP membrane will be modeled and the relation among the key variables (pressure and capacitance) will be determined. Hence, such a relation depends on the geometrical shape of the used membrane. The development process is carried out to propose alternative solutions for the sensor design using the DEAP and the laminate material. Test methodology, pressure-based test rig, prototypes, and software are developed afterwards to evaluate the prototypes test pieces. In general, the DEAP material has proven to be a very good sensor for pressure taking the advantage of flexibility, wide range of operation, and finally the sensitivity. The theoretical model is benchmarked against the acquired data from the tests, whereby high correlation within an approximate range of 0-23 mmHg (1.7% mean error) has been observed showing a promising application for the DEAP material in pressure sensing in general, and demonstrating the feasibility for the conceptualization of the blood pressure sensing system based on DEAP material. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Temperature and Pore Size Dependence on the Sensitivity of a Hydrogen Sensor Based on Nanoporous Platinum Thin Films

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2625 - 2629
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4654 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Nanoporous Pt thin films were prepared by co-sputtering Cu and Pt, followed by dealloying and coarsening. The size of the pores was controlled by the coarsening temperature. The nanoporous Pt thin films had pores ranging from a few nanometers to 35 nm. A resistance transient method was used to measure the sensitivity of these thin films in different hydrogen concentrations using air as the carrier gas. The effect of temperature and pore size on the sensitivity and response time were studied. A sensitivity of 3.5% was obtained for 1000 ppm of hydrogen at room temperature for the largest fabricated pore size of 35 nm. The fabricated sensors showed quick response and repeatability in their sensing mechanism. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Performance of Wireless Chemical Sensor Network With Dynamic Collaboration

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2630 - 2637
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (775 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The chemical tracers dispersed by turbulent motion in the environment display rather complex and even chaotic properties. Meanwhile, chemical tracer detecting sensors with air sampling consume significant energy. Hazardous chemical releases are rare events. If all sensors in a wireless chemical sensor network (WCSN) are left in the active state continuously, it would result in significant power consumption. Therefore, dynamic sensor activation is crucial for the longevity of WCSNs. Moreover, the statistical characteristics of chemical tracers to be detected (temporal and spatial correlations, etc.) and placement of chemical sensors can also become the key parameters that influence the WCSN design and performance. In this paper, we investigate the effect of spatial correlation of a chemical tracer field, and also the effect of network topology, on the performance of a WCSN that employs an epidemiology-based dynamic sensor activation protocol. We present a simulation framework that comprises models of the spatially correlated tracer field, individual chemical sensor nodes, and the sensor network. After validating this simulation framework against an analytical model, we perform simulation experiments to evaluate the effect of spatial correlation and network topology on selected performance metrics: response time, level of sensor activation, and network scalability. Our simulations show that spatial correlation of chemical tracer field has a detrimental effect on the performance of a WCSN that uses an epidemiological activation protocol. The results also suggest that a WCSN with random network topology has poorer performance compared to one with a regular grid topology in this application. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Synthesis and Application of New Porphyrin Derivatives for Preparation of Copper Selective Electrodes: Influence of Carbon Nanotube on Their Responses

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2638 - 2647
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (486 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The synthesis and characterization of 5-(4- benzylacrylamide)-10, 15, 20-tris(4-benzylamine)porphyrin ((BAmidBAmin)P) and poly[5-(4-benzylacrylamide)-10, 15, 20-tris(4-benzylamine)porphyrin] (P[(BAmidBAmin)P]) are reported in this paper. The techniques IR, 1 H-NMR, UV-Vis and elemental microanalysis were used to characterize the porphyrins. These new compounds were used to manufacture a new carbon paste selective electrode for the measurement of copper ions in real samples. The effects of the carriers, sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB), multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), and Nujol on the electrode response were studied. The optimum values for (BAmidBAmin)P electrode were obtained as follows: carbon (150 mg), NaTPB (1.8 mg ), Nujol (36 mg), carrier (7 mg), and MWCNT (15 mg); and the optimum values for P[(BAmidBAmin)P] electrode were found to be 150, 3, 30, 7, and 20 mg, respectively. At the optimal conditions, the responses of the electrodes are linear in the Cu2+ concentration of 5.0 × 10-9 - 1.0 × 10-1 mol/L for (BAmidBAmin)P electrode and 1.0 × 10-8 - 1.0 × 10-1 mol/L for P[(BAmidBAmin)P] electrode. Moreover, the Nernstian slopes for (BAmidBAmin)P and P[(BAmidBAmin)P] electrodes were 29.50 ± 1.00 and 29.84 ± 1.00 mV per decade-1, respectively. The advantages of these electrodes include a low detection limit (4 × 10-9 and 8.5× 10-9 mol/L, wide pH range (2.5-5.5), short response time (~2 s) and high lifetime (3 months) for both carriers. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Non-Mechanical Dual-Axis Scanning Laser Doppler Velocimeter

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2648 - 2652
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (310 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A dual-axis scanning laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) without any moving mechanism in its sensor probe is proposed. In this LDV, the measurement position is scanned in both axial and transversal directions with one probe. The direction of the scan is changed by changing the polarization of the beam input to the probe. The results of the experiment using a setup of the sensor probe consisting of bulk optical components indicate that the measurement position can be successfully scanned in both axial and transversal directions. The scan ranges are estimated to be 54.8 mm over the wavelength range of 20 nm for axial scan and 20.8 mm over the wavelength range of 32 nm for transversal scan. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Tilted c -Axis Thin-Film Bulk Wave Resonant Pressure Sensors With Improved Sensitivity

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2653 - 2654
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (249 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Aluminum nitride thin-film bulk wave resonant pressure sensors employing c- and tilted c-axis texture, have been fabricated and tested for their pressure sensitivities. The c-axis tilted film bulk acoustic resonators pressure sensors demonstrate substantially higher-pressure sensitivity compared to its c-axis oriented counterpart. More specifically, the thickness plate quasi-shear resonance has demonstrated the highest pressure sensitivity while further being able to preserve its performance in liquid environment. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Non-Uniformly Tiled CMOS Image Sensors for Efficient On-Chip Image Compression

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2655 - 2663
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (932 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor with non-uniform pixel placement that enables a highly efficient calculation of the discrete cosine transform (DCT), which is the most mathematically intensive step of an image compression algorithm. This technique is based on the arithmetic Fourier transform (AFT), which has been shown to be five times more computationally efficient than DCT derivation methods commonly used. In this paper, the focus is on the basic theory and algorithm as well as the sensitivity of the method to image sensor fixed pattern noise (FPN). The architecture and circuits have been implemented in a conventional CMOS process. The method has been demonstrated in the current prototype and results that enable an assessment of the sensitivity to FPN have been obtained. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Potential Sensor Based on Electrochemical {\rm NiFe}_{2}{\rm O}_{4} Film Prepared by EB-PVD

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2664 - 2665
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (267 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The potential sensor is the key element and the major obstacle to realizing corrosion monitoring and control of the infrastructures in civil engineering. A novel solid-state potential sensor is prepared by the electron-beam physical vapor deposition technique. The phase composition of the oxidation film is investigated by X-ray diffraction. Also, the montmorillonite material with three-dimensional layered structure is used as the carrier material to prepare the conductive layer of the potential sensor. Furthermore, the potential stability of the sensor is verified in the simulated concrete pore solution. The results indicate that the potential sensor based on NiFe2O4 film is suitable to assembling the corrosion monitoring and control systems in civil engineering. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Deflection Sensitivity Calibration of Heated Microcantilevers Using Pseudo-Gratings

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2666 - 2667
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (265 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We report a technique to calibrate the sensitivity of sensor-integrated atomic force microscope cantilevers using pseudo-gratings. An offset signal superposed onto the cantilever control signal modulates the cantilever position over a flat surface, driving the cantilever toward and away from the surface in a controlled way. The relationship between the cantilever sensor signal and displacement provides the cantilever calibration. We show how this technique can be used to calibrate heated microcantilever sensors. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Assessment of an LPG mPOF for Strain Sensing

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 2668 - 2673
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (642 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We demonstrate the feasibility of long-period gratings (LPGs) written in microstructured polymer optical fibers (mPOFs) for detecting and measuring the strain rate and magnitude of engineering structures. We validate and compare the results of our experimental tests to a commercial fiber Bragg grating sensor. The encouraging results open the way to the use of LPG mPOF sensors in structural health monitoring applications. View full abstract»

    Open Access

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Sensors Journal is a peer-reviewed, monthly online/print  journal devoted to sensors and sensing phenomena

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Krikor Ozanyan
University of Manchester
Manchester, M13 9PL, U.K.