By Topic

Information Technology in Biomedicine, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date March 2012

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 20 of 20
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): C1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (310 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine publication information

    Page(s): C2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (39 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Emerging Technologies for Patient-Specific Healthcare

    Page(s): 185 - 189
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (187 KB)  

    In this paper, a series of emerging technologies aim to emphasize the provision of personalized healthcare services to patients were studied. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Prediction of the Timing and the Rhythm of the Parkinsonian Subthalamic Nucleus Neural Spikes Using the Local Field Potentials

    Page(s): 190 - 197
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (896 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we discuss the use of a nonlinear cascade model to predict the subthalamic nucleus spike activity from the local field potentials recorded in the motor area of the nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients undergoing deep brain stimulation. We use a segment of appropriately selected and processed data recorded from five nuclei to acquire the information of the spike timing and rhythm of a single neuron and estimate the model parameters. We then use the rest of each recording to assess the model's accuracy in predicting spike timing, rhythm, and interspike intervals. We show that the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the predicted spikes remains inside the 95% confidence interval of the CDF of the recorded spikes. By training the model appropriately, we prove its ability to provide quite accurate predictions for multiple-neuron recordings as well, and we establish its validity as a simple yet biologically plausible model of the intranuclear spike activity recorded from Parkinson's disease patients. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • NeuroGlasses: A Neural Sensing Healthcare System for 3-D Vision Technology

    Page(s): 198 - 204
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (553 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    3-D vision technologies are extensively used in a wide variety of applications. Particularly glasses-based 3-D technology facilities are increasingly becoming affordable to our daily lives. Considering health issues raised by 3-D video technologies, to the best of our knowledge, most of the pilot studies are practiced in a highly-controlled laboratory environment only. In this paper, we present NeuroGlasses, a nonintrusive wearable physiological signal monitoring system to facilitate health analysis and diagnosis of 3-D video watchers. The NeuroGlasses system acquires health-related signals by physiological sensors and provides feedbacks of health-related features. Moreover, the NeuroGlasses system employs signal-specific reconstruction and feature extraction to compensate the distortion of signals caused by variation of the placement of the sensors. We also propose a server-based NeuroGlasses infrastructure where physiological features can be extracted for real-time response or collected on the server side for long term analysis and diagnosis. Through an on-campus pilot study, the experimental results show that NeuroGlasses system can effectively provide physiological information for healthcare purpose. Furthermore, it approves that 3-D vision technology has a significant impact on the physiological signals, such as EEG, which potentially leads to neural diseases. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Rhythmogram-Based Analysis for Continuous Electrographic Data of the Human Brain

    Page(s): 205 - 211
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (857 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Ecologically relevant stimuli are rarely used in scientific studies because they are difficult to control. Instead, researchers employ simple stimuli with sharp boundaries (in space and time). Here, we explore how the rhythmogram can be used to provide much needed rigorous control of natural continuous stimuli like music and speech. The analysis correlates important features in the time course of stimuli with corresponding features in brain activations elicited by the same stimuli. Correlating the identified regularities of the stimulus time course with the features extracted from the activations of each voxel of a tomographic analysis of brain activity provides a powerful view of how different brain regions are influenced by the stimulus at different times and over different (user-selected) timescales. The application of the analysis to tomographic solutions extracted from magnetoencephalographic data recorded while subjects listen to music reveals a surprising and aesthetically pleasing aspect of brain function: an area believed to be specialized for visual processing is recruited to analyze the music after the acoustic signal is transformed to a feature map. The methodology is ideal for exploring processing of complex stimuli, e.g., linguistic structure and meaning and how it fails, for example, in developmental dyslexia. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Subject-Specific Estimation of Central Aortic Blood Pressure Using an Individualized Transfer Function: A Preliminary Feasibility Study

    Page(s): 212 - 220
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (902 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a new approach to the estimation of unknown central aortic blood pressure waveform from a directly measured peripheral blood pressure waveform, in which a physics-based model is employed to solve for a subject- and state-specific individualized transfer function (ITF). The ITF provides the means to estimate the unknown central aortic blood pressure from the peripheral blood pressure. Initial proof-of-principle for the ITF is demonstrated experimentally through an in vivo protocol. In swine subjects taken through wide range of physiologic conditions, the ITF was on average able to provide central aortic blood pressure waveforms more accurately than a nonindividualized transfer function. Its usefulness was most evident when the subject's pulse transit time deviated from normative values. In these circumstances, the ITF yielded statistically significant reductions over a nonindividualized transfer function in the following three parameters: 1) 30% reduction in the root-mean-squared error between estimated versus actual central aortic blood pressure waveform (p <; 10-4), 2) >;50% reduction in the error between estimated versus actual systolic and pulse pressures ( p <; 10), and 3) a reduction in the overall breakdown rate (i.e., the frequency of estimation errors >;3 mmHg, p <; 10-4). In conclusion, the ITF may offer an attractive alternative to existing methods that estimates the central aortic blood pressure waveform, and may be particularly useful in nonnormative physiologic conditions. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Numerical Characterization and Modeling of Subject-Specific Ultrawideband Body-Centric Radio Channels and Systems for Healthcare Applications

    Page(s): 221 - 227
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (662 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The paper presents a subject-specific radio propagation study and system modeling in wireless body area networks using a simulation tool based on the parallel finite-difference time-domain technique. This technique is well suited to model the radio propagation around complex, inhomogeneous objects such as the human body. The impact of different digital phantoms in on-body radio channel and system performance was studied. Simulations were performed at the frequency of 3-10 GHz considering a typical hospital environment, and were validated by on-site measurements with reasonably good agreement. The analysis demonstrated that the characteristics of the on-body radio channel and system performance are subject-specific and are associated with human genders, height, and body mass index. Maximum variations of almost 18.51% are observed in path loss exponent due to change of subject, which gives variations of above 50% in system bit error rate performance. Therefore, careful consideration of subject-specific parameters are necessary for achieving energy efficient and reliable radio links and system performance for body-centric wireless network. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Context-Based Electronic Health Record: Toward Patient Specific Healthcare

    Page(s): 228 - 234
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (433 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Due to the increasingly data-intensive clinical environment, physicians now have unprecedented access to detailed clinical information from a multitude of sources. However, applying this information to guide medical decisions for a specific patient case remains challenging. One issue is related to presenting information to the practitioner: displaying a large (irrelevant) amount of information often leads to information overload. Next-generation interfaces for the electronic health record (EHR) should not only make patient data easily searchable and accessible, but also synthesize fragments of evidence documented in the entire record to understand the etiology of a disease and its clinical manifestation in individual patients. In this paper, we describe our efforts toward creating a context-based EHR, which employs biomedical ontologies and (graphical) disease models as sources of domain knowledge to identify relevant parts of the record to display. We hypothesize that knowledge (e.g., variables, relationships) from these sources can be used to standardize, annotate, and contextualize information from the patient record, improving access to relevant parts of the record and informing medical decision making. To achieve this goal, we describe a framework that aggregates and extracts findings and attributes from free-text clinical reports, maps findings to concepts in available knowledge sources, and generates a tailored presentation of the record based on the information needs of the user. We have implemented this framework in a system called Adaptive EHR, demonstrating its capabilities to present and synthesize information from neurooncology patients. This paper highlights the challenges and potential applications of leveraging disease models to improve the access, integration, and interpretation of clinical patient data. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • SEMPATH Ontology: Modeling Multidisciplinary Treatment Schemes Utilizing Semantics

    Page(s): 235 - 240
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (381 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A dramatic increase of demand for provided treatment quality has occurred during last decades. The main challenge to be confronted, so as to increase treatment quality, is the personalization of treatment, since each patient constitutes a unique case. Healthcare provision encloses a complex environment since healthcare provision organizations are highly multidisciplinary. In this paper, we present the conceptualization of the domain of clinical pathways (CP). The SEMPATH (SEMantic PATHways) Oontology comprises three main parts: 1) the CP part; 2) the business and finance part; and 3) the quality assurance part. Our implementation achieves the conceptualization of the multidisciplinary domain of healthcare provision, in order to be further utilized for the implementation of a Semantic Web Rules (SWRL rules) repository. Finally, SEMPATH Ontology is utilized for the definition of a set of SWRL rules for the human papillomavirus) disease and its treatment scheme. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Experimental Study of a Hybrid Microwave Radiometry—Hyperthermia Apparatus With the Use of an Anatomical Head Phantom

    Page(s): 241 - 247
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (679 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents the latest progress made concerning a hybrid diagnostic and therapeutic system able to provide focused microwave radiometric temperature and/or conductivity variation measurements and hyperthermia treatment. Previous experimental studies of our group have demonstrated the system performance and focusing properties in phantom as well as human experiments. The system is able to detect temperature and conductivity variations with frequency-dependent detection depth and spatial sensitivity. Numerous studies have also demonstrated the improvement of the system focusing properties attributed to the use of dielectric and left handed matching layers. In this study, similar experimental procedures are performed but this time using an anatomical head model as phantom aiming to achieve a more accurate modeling of the system's future real function. This way, another step is made toward the deeper understanding of the system's capabilities, with the view to further use it in experimental procedures with laboratory animals and human volunteers. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Mining Data From Hemodynamic Simulations for Generating Prediction and Explanation Models

    Page(s): 248 - 254
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (427 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    One of the most common causes of human death is stroke, which can be caused by carotid bifurcation stenosis. In our work, we aim at proposing a prototype of a medical expert system that could significantly aid medical experts to detect hemodynamic abnormalities (increased artery wall shear stress). Based on the acquired simulated data, we apply several methodologies for1) predicting magnitudes and locations of maximum wall shear stress in the artery, 2) estimating reliability of computed predictions, and 3) providing user-friendly explanation of the model's decision. The obtained results indicate that the evaluated methodologies can provide a useful tool for the given problem domain. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • High-Grade Glioma Diffusive Modeling Using Statistical Tissue Information and Diffusion Tensors Extracted from Atlases

    Page(s): 255 - 263
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (657 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Glioma, especially glioblastoma, is a leading cause of brain cancer fatality involving highly invasive and neoplastic growth. Diffusive models of glioma growth use variations of the diffusion-reaction equation in order to simulate the invasive patterns of glioma cells by approximating the spatiotemporal change of glioma cell concentration. The most advanced diffusive models take into consideration the heterogeneous velocity of glioma in gray and white matter, by using two different discrete diffusion coefficients in these areas. Moreover, by using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), they simulate the anisotropic migration of glioma cells, which is facilitated along white fibers, assuming diffusion tensors with different diffusion coefficients along each candidate direction of growth. Our study extends this concept by fully exploiting the proportions of white and gray matter extracted by normal brain atlases, rather than discretizing diffusion coefficients. Moreover, the proportions of white and gray matter, as well as the diffusion tensors, are extracted by the respective atlases; thus, no DTI processing is needed. Finally, we applied this novel glioma growth model on real data and the results indicate that prognostication rates can be improved. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Personalization and Adaptation to the Medium and Context in a Fall Detection System

    Page(s): 264 - 271
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (356 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The main objective of this paper is to present a distributed processing architecture that explicitly integrates capabilities for its continuous adaptation to the medium, the context, and the user. This architecture is applied to a falling detection system through: (1) an optimization module that finds the optimal operation parameters for the detection algorithms of the system devices; (2) a distributed processing architecture that provides capabilities for remote firmware update of the smart sensors. The smart sensor also provides an estimation of activities of daily living (ADL), which results very useful in monitoring of the elderly and patients with chronic diseases. The developed experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of the system and specifically, the accuracy of the proposed algorithms and procedures (100% success for impact detection, 100% sensitivity and 95.68% specificity rates for fall detection, and 100% success for ADL level classification). Although the experiments have been developed with a cohort of young volunteers, the personalization and adaption mechanisms of the proposed architecture related to the concepts of "design for all" and "design space" will significantly ease the adaptation of the system for its application to the elderly. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • ARTreat Project: Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulation of Plaque Formation and Development in the Arteries

    Page(s): 272 - 278
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (840 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease characterized by the accumulation of lipids and fibrous elements in arteries. It is characterized by dysfunction of endothelium and vasculitis, and accumulation of lipid, cholesterol, and cell elements inside blood vessel wall. In this study, a continuum-based approach for plaque formation and development in 3-D is presented. The blood flow is simulated by the 3-D Navier-Stokes equations, together with the continuity equation while low-density lipoprotein (LDL) transport in lumen of the vessel is coupled with Kedem-Katchalsky equations. The inflammatory process was solved using three additional reaction-diffusion partial differential equations. Transport of labeled LDL was fitted with our experiment on the rabbit animal model. Matching with histological data for LDL localization was achieved. Also, 3-D model of the straight artery with initial mild constriction of 30% plaque for formation and development is presented. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Development and Evaluation of an Ambulatory Stress Monitor Based on Wearable Sensors

    Page(s): 279 - 286
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (534 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Chronic stress is endemic to modern society. However, as it is unfeasible for physicians to continuously monitor stress levels, its diagnosis is nontrivial. Wireless body sensor networks offer opportunities to ubiquitously detect and monitor mental stress levels, enabling improved diagnosis, and early treatment. This article describes the development of a wearable sensor platform to monitor a number of physiological correlates of mental stress. We discuss tradeoffs in both system design and sensor selection to balance information content and wearability. Using experimental signals collected from the wearable sensor, we describe a selected number of physiological features that show good correlation with mental stress. In particular, we propose a new spectral feature that estimates the balance of the autonomic nervous system by combining information from the power spectral density of respiration and heart rate variability. We validate the effectiveness of our approach on a binary discrimination problem when subjects are placed under two psychophysiological conditions: mental stress and relaxation. When used in a logistic regression model, our feature set is able to discriminate between these two mental states with a success rate of 81% across subjects. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Integrated e-Health Approach Based on Vascular Ultrasound and Pulse Wave Analysis for Asymptomatic Atherosclerosis Detection and Cardiovascular Risk Stratification in the Community

    Page(s): 287 - 294
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (810 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    New strategies are urgently needed to identify subjects at increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD) development or complications. A National Public University Center (CUiiDARTE) was created in Uruguay, based on six main pillars: 1) integration of experts in different disciplines and creation of multidisciplinary teams, 2) incidence in public and professional education programs to give training in the use of new technologies and to shift the focus from ACVD treatment to disease prevention, 3) implementation of free vascular studies in the community (distributed rather than centralized healthcare), 4) innovation and application of e-Health and noninvasive technology and approaches, 5) design and development of a biomedical approach to determine the target population and patient workflow, and 6) improvement in individual risk estimation and differentiation between aging and ACVD-related arterial changes using population-based epidemiological and statistical patient-specific models. This work describes main features of CUiiDARTE project implementation, the scientific and technological steps and innovations done for individual risk stratification, and sub-clinical ACVD diagnosis. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • 2012 IEEE membership form

    Page(s): 295 - 296
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1368 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine information for authors

    Page(s): C3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (33 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): C4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (158 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine publishes basic and applied papers of information technology applications in health, healthcare and biomedicine.

 

This Transaction ceased publication in 2012. The current retitled publication is IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Yuan-ting Zhang
427, Ho Sin Hang Engineering Building, The Chinese
University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong
ytzhang@ee.cuhk.edu.hk
Phone:+852 2609-8458
Fax:+852 2609-5558