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Instrumentation & Measurement Magazine, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date February 2012

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • IEEE Instrumentation & Measurement Magazine - Front cover

    Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 2
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  • The magnificent Mediterranean [From the Editor's Bench]

    Page(s): 4
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  • A life of opportunities [President's Perspectives]

    Page(s): 6 - 7
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  • Recent advances in MEMS sensor technology – biomedical applications

    Page(s): 8 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (920 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) use microminiature sensors and actuators. MEMS technology provides the benefits of small size, low weight, high performance, easy mass-production and low cost. This article is the first part of a three-part series on MEMS sensors. In the present article, we provide a general introduction to MEMS sensing and the primary sensing techniques. Next, MEMS-based bio-medical sensors are explained. We consider MEMS devices that are: designed to detect triglycerides, c-reactive protein, and glucose, respectively; bio-inspired robotic fingers with tissue softness characterization sensors for pressure measurement during surgical procedures; for counting blood cells; acoustic sensors for 2-D sound source localization; pressure measurement sensors on the wings of an insect-like flying robot; and ultra-miniature sensors for intramuscular pressure measurement. The second part of the series will be dedicated to mechanical sensors. There, some related technologies of MEMS sensors will be discussed including compensation for environmental effects, the Casimir effect, and harvesting of energy for self-powered sensors. Also, the subject of sensor selection will be addressed. The third part will treat MEMS sensing in the thermo-fluid and electro-magnetic domains. View full abstract»

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  • 2012 IEEE I2MTC - May 13–16

    Page(s): 15
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  • Gallium nitride-based gas, chemical and biomedical sensors

    Page(s): 16 - 21
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (585 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Semiconductor-based sensors are widely used for applications in detection of particular gases and liquids, fire detection, liquid quality monitoring, biosensing and medical sensing. As an example, our group has installed hydrogen sensors at a car dealership in Orlando, FL, USA, that houses a fleet of hydrogen-fuelled buses. These sensors are platinum (Pt)-coated aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) or gallium nitride (GaN) differential diodes whose output can be remotely monitored via an Internet connection and which provide an alarm both locally and to phones of relevant personnel. A screen-shot of the output of the six detector array is shown in Fig. 1. View full abstract»

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  • Issues in designing practical wireless sensors

    Page(s): 22 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (274 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Wireless systems are a part of our personal lives. Why are the benefits of wireless not yet realized in our working lives? Is it because the benefits of doing away with wires are somehow less compelling in industrial applications than in our homes? No, if anything, the benefits are more compelling in industrial applications. I believe it is because practical wireless sensors are not yet widely available. This paper will discuss issues that need to be addressed to make wireless sensors practical. View full abstract»

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  • Call for papers

    Page(s): 27
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  • Physiological signals of autistic children can be useful

    Page(s): 28 - 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (678 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article covers the latest research concerning the measurement of physiological signals of children with autism, particularly for the study of changing emotions in various environments. Answers to important questions regarding autistic children's physiological activity are examined, and we will see that within a non-social environment, physiological responses are the same between children with and without autism but different in environments with social contexts. Moreover, physiological signals can be used as a reliable indicator of emotions of children with autism. Also covered are the latest developments in wearable sensor technologies avail- able for measuring on-the-go. I review additional research that identifies body signals in response to stimuli and may help ex- plain core social deficits in children with autism. View full abstract»

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  • Practical issues for installing instrumentation outdoors Part 2: Part 37 in a series of tutorials on instrumentation and measurement

    Page(s): 33 - 41
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1521 KB)  

    This tutorial is the second of a two-part series on the challenges of installing instrumentation outside in the wild. The variety of physical, chemical, and biological assaults that can occur is quite amazing. The first part introduced problems with physical extremes and attacks by insects, animals, and human beings. In this part, we follow up with solutions for: environment-appropriate packaging; cables and connectors; electromagnetic compatibility (EMC); conditions that may apply to mechanical movement of the system; some aspects of power and cooling which include batteries, other energy sources and energy storage, types of power distribution and a few case studies; installation of the system; operation of the system; maintenance; disposal; and cost considerations. View full abstract»

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  • Compressive sensing [Instrumentation Notes]

    Page(s): 42 - 46
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    Though mathematical theorems do not have exceptions, sometimes it is possible to "sneak around" the hypotheses of the theorems and achieve things that seem to be impossible. The Nyquist sampling theorem is a case in point. The theorem seems to sav that if vou have a low-pass signal, then you need to sample the signal at a rate that is more than twice the highest frequency in the signal. In fact, there are many ways of supplementing the hypotheses of the theorem and achieving better results. In this brief introduction to compressive sensing, we present one such technique and a simple application.The literature on compressive sensing is vast and is growing all the time. There are many, many other interesting applications of compressive sensing. The interested reader might want to read about the one pixel camera, for example. View full abstract»

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  • The evolution of time measurement, Part 4: the atomic second [Recalibration]

    Page(s): 47 - 51
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (621 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Before the invention of atomic clocks, the second was defined by dividing the period of an astronomical event into a shorter time interval. For example, the second was once defined by dividing the average period of one revolution of the Earth on its axis. The mean solar second was equal to 1/86,400 of the mean solar day. To create a more stable unit of time interval, the second was redefined in 1956 as 1/31,556,925.9747 of the tropical year 1900. The ephemeris second was indeed more stable than the mean solar second but was nearly impossible to use as a time reference and of little use to metrologists or engineers. In retrospect, it seems almost ridiculous that another astronomical definition of the second was accepted during a period when atomic clocks were already being built [1], [2]. A clean transition from the mean solar second to the atomic second would have made more sense. Doomed from the start, the ephemeris second would be easy to forget about except for one thing - it became the comparison reference for the atomic second. View full abstract»

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  • New products

    Page(s): 52 - 57
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  • Technical Standards Activities: the "How-Tos" of standards [TC News]

    Page(s): 58 - 60
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  • IEEE I&M Society Technical Committee Listing

    Page(s): 61
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  • Society news

    Page(s): 62
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  • Calendar

    Page(s): 63
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  • The 2011 IEEE Instrumentation & Measurement Society

    Page(s): 64
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Magazine contains applications-oriented and tutorial articles on topics in the broadly based areas of instrumentation system design and measurement techniques.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Prof. Wendy Van Moer

wendy.w.vanmoer@ieee.org
IandMMagazineEIC@ieee.org