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Display Technology, Journal of

Issue 2 • Date Feb. 2012

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): C1
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  • Journal of Display Technology publication information

    Page(s): C2
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 63
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  • Blank page

    Page(s): 64
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  • Simulation of Surface Plasmon Coupled Conjugate Polymer for Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes

    Page(s): 65 - 69
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (722 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Since 1977, conjugated polymers have received attention as materials for display devices with a low-cost solution process, but the low efficiency of these materials has been considered as a drawback which should be overcome. Nowadays metal nanoparticles are inserted on the display device's cathode to overcome the low efficiency of the materials through the enhanced coupling between the Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and exciton in emitting material . In our previous work, conjugated polymer with an imprinted regular Ag-dot-array structure showed a 2.7-fold improvement of integrated photoluminescence (PL) intensity , but the result was not optimized. Therefore, in this study, we calculated the Ag-dot-array absorbance-peak shift in detail using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation and found the absorbance peak location which maximized photoluminescence (PL) intensity, depending on various Ag dot condition. The resulting information was applied to the previous structure . Thus, we reduced the trial and error of finding the optimized absorbance peak location and the imprint processing costs. The most important parameter of the Ag-dot-array absorbance peak was the lattice constant. Furthermore, we proved the indium tin oxide (ITO) waveguide effect in our structure using FDTD. View full abstract»

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  • Accommodative Response of Integral Imaging in Near Distance

    Page(s): 70 - 78
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1311 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Objective evaluation results using optometric device to measure accommodative responses in viewing a real object and integral imaging are presented. From the empirical results between the real object and an integrated three-dimensional (3D) image, we find that over 73% of participants keep eyes on the real integrated 3D image instead of a display panel. The results also show the participants do not recognize a mismatch between the accommodative response and the convergence of the eye, which used to be believed as one of the major factors to cause visual fatigue in viewing near-distance integral imaging. Seventy-one normal adult subjects (23 ~ 38 years old) participated in the experiment, and accommodative response measurement results of the real integrated image show a statistically significant concordance with real objects. View full abstract»

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  • LED Backlight Module by Lightguide-Diffusive Component

    Page(s): 79 - 86
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1463 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This study examines the luminance and uniformity characteristics of a newly invented secondary optical lens, called the “lightguide-diffusive component,” which has a wide emission angle and is designed for thin direct LED backlighting applications. The LED backlight module is composed of, at the very least, a light source, a secondary lightguide-diffusive component with a newly designed micro-structure having a reflective bottom surface, and a flexible printed circuit (FPC) for LED lighting. This lightguide-diffusive component modifies the emission profile of a single LED to provide better illumination and greater uniformity. The newly designed secondary optical lens module is shaped to cover the LED array, resulting in a more uniform spatial light energy distribution on the emission plane of the LED backlight. The uniformity ratio for the new design shows an increase of 24%, from 60% to 84%, and the luminance a 23.29% improvement, from 10 000 nits to 12 329 nits. View full abstract»

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  • Submillisecond-Response Sheared Polymer Network Liquid Crystals for Display Applications

    Page(s): 87 - 90
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (477 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A 4π phase modulator with an average gray-to-gray response time of ~ 400 μs is demonstrated based on sheared polymer network liquid crystal (SPNLC). This device exhibits a low scattering at 532 nm due to our new material set and shearing technique. We also discuss the application of SPNLCs for 3D display, such as lenticular lens. View full abstract»

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  • Compact Polyimide-Based Antennas for Flexible Displays

    Page(s): 91 - 97
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1402 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we present two compact ultra thin and flexible printed monopole antennas intended for integration with flexible displays, such as flexible organic light-emission displays (FOLEDs) and active matrix electro-phoretic displays (AM-EPDs). The proposed antennas are designed to provide Wireless local area network (WLAN) and Bluetooth connectivity for flexible displays. The first design is a dual band antenna operating at 2.45 GHz and 5.2 GHz while the second is a single band antenna operating at 2.4 GHz. Both antennas were printed on a Kapton polyimide-based substrate with dimensions (35 mm×25 mm) and (26.5 mm×25 mm) for the dual and single band respectively. Antenna properties, such as gain, far-field radiation patterns, scattering parameter S11 are provided. Moreover, the effect of folding/bending was performed experimentally on both designs to study its influence on the antennas performance. The proposed compact, thin and flexible designs along with antennas characteristics are perfectly suitable for integration into flexible displays for WLAN and Bluetooth connectivity. View full abstract»

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  • Blue-Phase Liquid Crystal Displays With Vertical Field Switching

    Page(s): 98 - 103
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (843 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A low-voltage, high-transmittance, hysteresis-free, and submillisecond-response polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystal (BPLC) display with vertical field switching (VFS) and oblique incident light is demonstrated. In the VFS mode, the electric field is in longitudinal direction and is uniform. By using a thin cell gap and a large oblique incident angle, the operation voltage is significantly reduced which plays a key role to eliminate hysteresis and residual birefringence. The VFS mode is a strong contender for the emerging BPLC display and photonic devices. View full abstract»

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  • TFTs With High Overlay Alignment for Integration of Flexible Display Backplanes

    Page(s): 104 - 107
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    Abstract-This work reports an integration process for hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film transistor (TFT) backplanes on flexible plastic substrates that attempts to reduce the large misalignment between the successive patterned layers in fabrication. Here, a double-sided adhesive tape is used to attach the plastic substrate to a rigid carrier. The results indicate a reduction of overlay misalignment from 22 μm on free-standing foil to 2 μm when laminated to a rigid carrier for five consecutive mask layers. Electrical characteristics of the fabricated a-Si:H TFTs on 3" round plastic substrates show an ON/OFF current ratio of over 108, field-effect mobility of 0.8 cm2/V · s, and gate leakage current of 10-13 A. View full abstract»

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  • Dynamic Backlight Adaptation Based on the Details of Image for Liquid Crystal Displays

    Page(s): 108 - 111
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (716 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In conventional liquid crystal display (LCDs), the backlight is set to maximum luminance regardless of the image which causes power waste and light leakage in the dark scenes. To circumvent these problems, the local dimming backlight is investigated. The algorithm based on details of the input image for the local dimming backlight in LCDs is proposed in this paper. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieves low power consumption and little image distortion ratio simultaneously. View full abstract»

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  • Depth Calculation Method of Integral Imaging Based on Gaussian Beam Distribution Model

    Page(s): 112 - 116
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (633 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we propose a concept of the optimal viewing distance range and a depth calculation method of integral imaging. By considering the light emanating from a single elemental image point as a Gaussian beam, we analyze the integral imaging depth range and deduce the depth calculation formulas in different display modes. Experiments in focused mode were carried out, and good results finally confirmed the feasibility of the proposed method. View full abstract»

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  • Corrections to “Laser Wavelength Choices for Pico-Projector Applications” [Jul 11 402-406]

    Page(s): 117
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    In the above titled paper (ibid., vol. 7, no. 7, pp. 402-406, July 2011), some errors were noted. Corrections are presented here. View full abstract»

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  • Blank page

    Page(s): 118
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  • Special issue on From 100G to Terabit Optical Networking

    Page(s): 119
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  • Special issue on nanoplasmonics

    Page(s): 120
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  • Journal of Display Technology information for authors

    Page(s): C3
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  • Blank page [back cover]

    Page(s): C4
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Aims & Scope

This publication covers the theory, design, fabrication, manufacturing and application of information displays and aspects of display technology.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Arokia Nathan
University of Cambridge
Cambridge, U.K.