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IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering

Issue 2 • April 1989

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Sea-ice characterization measurements needed for testing of microwave remote sensing models

    Publication Year: 1989, Page(s):149 - 158
    Cited by:  Papers (35)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1000 KB)

    The nature and accuracy of ice-characterization measurements needed to test two microwave backscattering models are clarified by examining the sensitivities of these models to variations in the geophysical parameters they require as input. First, the Bragg, or small perturbation, model for rough surface scattering, which appears appropriate for backscattering from new ice types at L-band, is consi... View full abstract»

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  • The Polar Floats Program

    Publication Year: 1989, Page(s):186 - 194
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1080 KB)

    The Polar Floats Program, an adaptation of midlatitude SOFAR float technology to the polar regions, is used to monitor subsurface circulation patterns over large spatial and temporal scales as well as to track mesoscale features in near realtime. The program is comprised of three major components that are now under development: an 80-Hz float transducer, American and French sea-ice-deployable list... View full abstract»

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  • The Autonomous Ocean Profiler: a current-driven oceanographic sensor platform

    Publication Year: 1989, Page(s):195 - 202
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (848 KB)

    The development and initial field test results of the Autonomous Ocean Profiler (AOP) are described. The profiler uses a hydrodynamic lift device to fly the instrument package up and down the water column along a taut vertical cable. Because the local currents drive the platform's vertical motion, power requirements are low, and therefore long, unattached deployments are possible. By using ARGOS o... View full abstract»

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  • Modification and deployment techniques for hand-deployed Arctic long-life sonobuoys

    Publication Year: 1989, Page(s):211 - 220
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1284 KB)

    Specific methods and equipment used to modify, power, and hand-deploy AN/SSQ-57A sonobuoys in the Arctic are discussed. The methods and suggestions can be easily extended for use with other types of sonobuoys. The modified sonobuoys transmit continuously for up to 30 days from a remote unmanned site to a manned base camp over a range of 20 km. Sample acoustic data from the ALPIS 87 ice station are... View full abstract»

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  • A rigid, cable-lowered instrument frame for measuring turbulence and internal waves in the Arctic

    Publication Year: 1989, Page(s):203 - 207
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (480 KB)

    The Arctic Internal Wave experiment (AIWEX) is discussed. For 1985, four instrument clusters, each measuring temperature, conductivity, and three orthogonal components of current velocity, were mounted on a 5.5-m-long rigid frame which was lowered by cable to depths as much as 70-m below the ice/ocean interface. The frame was used for both turbulent boundary layer studies in the near-surface mixed... View full abstract»

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  • Review and status of remote sensing of sea ice

    Publication Year: 1989, Page(s):127 - 138
    Cited by:  Papers (25)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1824 KB)

    The status of obtaining geophysical observations through the interpretation of satellite data over sea ice is discussed. It is pointed out that the community working in this area has grown in size and sophistication over the last decade, that the connection between microscopic properties of ice and its microwave behavior is now being understood, and that a good deal of accurate satellite-derived i... View full abstract»

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  • Position measurements with radiosondes

    Publication Year: 1989, Page(s):208 - 210
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (260 KB)

    The use of Omega sondes, designed for the determination of upper air wind vectors, for relative position measurements on the ground is described. The technique shows promise in measuring the deformation of sea ice, the motion of oceanic surface water, and the trajectories of constant-level balloons. The sondes need not be recollected, are inexpensive, and can be built up to large arrays. The accur... View full abstract»

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  • GEOSAT altimeter sea-ice mapping

    Publication Year: 1989, Page(s):139 - 148
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1304 KB)

    The efforts to use GEOSAT data to refine an ice index that is applicable to widely varying ice conditions are detailed. The sea-ice mapping requirements, the present US Navy ice-index operational utilization, and ongoing and future work that promises to provide additional sea-ice measurement capabilities are discussed. Possibilities include discrimination among water, land, ice, combination water/... View full abstract»

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  • Stress and strain instruments developed for field measurements of ice

    Publication Year: 1989, Page(s):159 - 165
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (744 KB)

    The instruments developed and operational experience gained in the measurement of strain rates and stresses in floating sea ice are described to indicate the total global loads occurring naturally against an artificial island or similar structure. A delta strainmeter and a thin-disk stress sensor were developed to service particular measurement needs for which suitable equipment was not available.... View full abstract»

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  • An impact sound source useful for Arctic remote sensing

    Publication Year: 1989, Page(s):166 - 172
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (484 KB)

    The impact on an ice surface of an energetic projectile, such as a rifle bullet, which creates an acoustic impulse in the water whose properties are useful for Arctic remote sensing, is discussed. The source level of these impulses is typically between 220 and 230 dB Re 1 μPa at 1m and most of their energy is within the band 500 Hz to 3 kHz. Possible remote sensing applications are reviewed tog... View full abstract»

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  • Physical oceanography instrumentation for the polar regions: a review

    Publication Year: 1989, Page(s):173 - 185
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1652 KB)

    The development of measurement systems for physical oceanography in polar regions is summarized, and selected instruments are described. Some instruments have been developed simply to provide access to the environment. Since hydrographic data are very sparse for large, inaccessible areas of the Arctic Ocean, hydrographic buoys have been developed that make long-term measurements of water temperatu... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering (ISSN 0364-9059) is the online-only quarterly publication of the IEEE Oceanic Engineering Society (IEEE OES). The scope of the Journal is the field of interest of the IEEE OES, which encompasses all aspects of science, engineering, and technology that address research, development, and operations pertaining to all bodies of water. This includes the creation of new capabilities and technologies from concept design through prototypes, testing, and operational systems to sense, explore, understand, develop, use, and responsibly manage natural resources.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
N. Ross Chapman
School of Earth & Ocean Sciences
University of Victoria
3800 Finnerty Road
Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 Canada
chapman@uvic.ca