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Proceedings of the IEEE

Issue 9 • Date Sep 1993

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • Possibilities of deep-submicrometer CMOS for very-high-speed computer logic

    Page(s): 1311 - 1324
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1328 KB)  

    It is shown that room-temperature CMOS, which has rarely been considered suitable for very-high-speed computer logic, can have sufficient performance to be the post-ECL (emitter-coupled logic) high-speed device when deep-submicrometer technology is available. The possibilities of CMOS are evaluated in the context of the very many factors related to computer logic. In a case study, it is shown that system performance comparable to that of the most modern large-scale computers is obtainable with room-temperature operation, assuming CMOS devices with gate length of 0.2-0.25 μm. Further possibilities for performance improvement and the advantage of CMOS compared with other technologies are discussed View full abstract»

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  • Using vector quantization for image processing

    Page(s): 1326 - 1341
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    A review is presented of vector quantization, the mapping of pixel intensity vectors into binary vectors indexing a limited number of possible reproductions, which is a popular image compression algorithm. Compression has traditionally been done with little regard for image processing operations that may precede or follow the compression step. Recent work has used vector quantization both to simplify image processing tasks, such as enhancement classification, halftoning, and edge detection, and to reduce the computational complexity by performing the tasks simultaneously with the compression. The fundamental ideas of vector quantization are explained, and vector quantization algorithms that perform image processing are surveyed View full abstract»

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  • Gigabit-density magnetic recording

    Page(s): 1344 - 1359
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    A tutorial on the principles of magnetic recording is given. The enormous rate of areal density increase for the past thirty years as well as the principal technological changes behind such sustained progress are outlined. The general issues involved in gigabit-density recording and the features that are common to both IBM'S and Hitachi's gigabit efforts are explored. The principal recording components, namely, the recording head and the medium, are considered, focusing on the problems encountered in designing, optimizing, and realizing them for gigabit-density applications. The performance of gigabit recording configurations from both IBM and Hitachi is reviewed. The performance limitations of these gigabit configurations and the prospects for further areal density extensions in magnetic recording are discussed View full abstract»

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  • Signal modeling techniques in speech recognition

    Page(s): 1215 - 1247
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2872 KB)  

    A tutorial on signal processing in state-of-the-art speech recognition systems is presented, reviewing those techniques most commonly used. The four basic operations of signal modeling, i.e. spectral shaping, spectral analysis, parametric transformation, and statistical modeling, are discussed. Three important trends that have developed in the last five years in speech recognition are examined. First, heterogeneous parameter sets that mix absolute spectral information with dynamic, or time-derivative, spectral information, have become common. Second, similarity transform techniques, often used to normalize and decorrelate parameters in some computationally inexpensive way, have become popular. Third, the signal parameter estimation problem has merged with the speech recognition process so that more sophisticated statistical models of the signal's spectrum can be estimated in a closed-loop manner. The signal processing components of these algorithms are reviewed View full abstract»

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  • An overview of electric vehicle technology

    Page(s): 1202 - 1213
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    An overview of the present status and future trends in electric vehicle technology is provided. The emphasis is on the impact of rapid development of electric motors, power electronics, microelectronics, and new materials. Comparisons are made among various electric drive systems and battery systems. The market size of electric vehicles in the coming years and the potential electric vehicle impacts are discussed View full abstract»

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  • Subspace-based signal analysis using singular value decomposition

    Page(s): 1277 - 1308
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    A unified approach is presented to the related problems of recovering signal parameters from noisy observations and identifying linear system model parameters from observed input/output signals, both using singular value decomposition (SVD) techniques. Both known and new SVD-based identification methods are classified in a subspace-oriented scheme. The SVD of a matrix constructed from the observed signal data provides the key step in a robust discrimination between desired signals and disturbing signals in terms of signal and noise subspaces. The methods that are presented are distinguished by the way in which the subspaces are determined and how the signal or system model parameters are extracted from these subspaces. Typical examples, such as the direction-of-arrival problem and system identification from input/output measurements, are elaborated upon, and some extensions to time-varying systems are given View full abstract»

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  • X-ray lithography-an overview

    Page(s): 1249 - 1274
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    The fundamentals of X-ray lithography are reviewed. Issues associated with resolution, wafer throughput, and process latitude are discussed. X-ray lithography is compared with other lithographic technologies; future advancements, such as X-ray projection lithography, are described. It is shown that the major barrier to the near-term success for X-ray lithography is the requirement for a defect-free one-to-one mask which satisfies the stringent image-placement needs of submicrometer patterning View full abstract»

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North Carolina State University