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Control Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date Feb. 1989

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Handling of irregular-sized mailpieces by adaptive robotics

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 3 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (580 KB)  

    Singulation is the term used by the US Postal Service to denote the removal of a single mailpiece from a stream, stack, or heap of mailpieces. To expedite the singulation of irregular items, a system for singulating overlapping mailpieces from a moving conveyor at 36 pieces/min with more than 95% efficiency has been developed. The system uses range imaging to guide an AdeptOne robot in removing the parcels from the moving conveyor.<> View full abstract»

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  • Automated flexible robotic circuit board assembler

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 9 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1138 KB)  

    The FLAIR (flexible assembly intelligent robot) workcell loads both through-hole and surface-mount odd-shaped components onto printed circuit boards. The workcell is completely data-driven, handles diverse boards in arbitrary batch sizes, and uses computer vision to examine components and boards. It incorporates sensor-based error detection and recovery, generic parts feeders, general-purpose lead straightening, and lead clinching. Cameras and robot are calibrated automatically. Although constituting a significant advance in functionality, the workcell requires trained engineering support.<> View full abstract»

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  • Aggressive trajectory generator for a robot ping-pong player

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 15 - 21
    Cited by:  Papers (21)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (645 KB)  

    A trajectory generation and tracking system designed to operate in a very dynamic environment is described. The system drives a PUMA 260 which is part of a functioning robot ping-pong player. The goal is to achieve predictable, reliable, high-performance motions at the envelope of robot capabilities. The task is sensor-driven, each motion is unique, and motions have to be changed while they are in progress. The author describes some of the requirements in detail, compares alternative high-performance trajectory types, describes the properties of the quintic polynomials used, discusses how to determine if a trajectory is feasible, and then outlines the implementation and its performance.<> View full abstract»

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  • Shape description and grasping for robot hand-eye coordination

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 22 - 29
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (987 KB)  

    The successful execution of grasping by a robot hand requires translation of visual information into control signals to the hand, which produce the desired spatial orientation and preshape for grasping an arbitrary object. An approach to this problem that is based on separation of the task into two modules is presented. A vision module is used to transform an image into a volumetric shape description using generalized cones. The data structure containing this geometric information becomes an input to the grasping module, which obtains a list of feasible grasping modes and a set of control signals for the robot hand. Features of both modules are discussed.<> View full abstract»

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  • Design and analysis of a statically balanced direct-drive manipulator

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 30 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (554 KB)  

    A statically balanced direct-drove robot has been constructed for stability analysis of the robot in constrained maneuvers. Using a four-bar linkage, a practical architecture is presented for the University of Minnesota direct-drive robot. As a result of the elimination of the gravity forces (without any counterweights), smaller actuators and amplifiers were chosen. The motors yield an acceleration five times that of gravity at the robot end point without overheating. High-torque low-speed brushless AC synchronous motors are used to power the robot. A graphite-epoxy composite is used to construct the robot links. A four-node parallel processor has been used to control the robot. The dynamic tracking accuracy, with the feedforward torque method as a control law, has been derived experimentally. The compliance and its stability condition have been analyzed and demonstrated experimentally.<> View full abstract»

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  • Parameter fine-tuning for robots

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 35 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (676 KB)  

    Fine-tuning the parameters of robots is a time-consuming and costly procedure, so that many commercial robot companies cannot afford to do it and the physical capability of robots is not fully realized. Autotune, a computer procedure that automatically tunes parameters of feedback compensators for robot arms in order to circumvent manual tuning and maximize capability, is outlined. Simulation and test results show that this autotuning is robust and efficient. Some practical implementation issues are discussed.<> View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased publication in 1990. The current retitled publication is IEEE Control Systems.

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