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Spectrum, IEEE

Issue 11 • Date November 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 23 of 23
  • IEEE Spectrum - Front cover

    Page(s): C1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1 - 3
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  • Assignment: Fukushima [Back Story]

    Page(s): 4
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  • Contributors

    Page(s): 6
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  • Covering Fukushima with a little help from our friends [Spectral lines]

    Page(s): 10
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  • The future of riots

    Page(s): 13 - 14
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  • Extraterrestrial Abode

    Page(s): 14
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  • Prospects for an artificial leaf are growing

    Page(s): 15 - 16
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  • Shutdown of fukushima reactors is ahead of schedule

    Page(s): 15 - 18
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  • Explaining LEDs' diminishing returns

    Page(s): 20
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  • Absolutely fab

    Page(s): 22 - 23
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  • A tale of two movies

    Page(s): 24 - 25
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  • Gestures creep into mouse interfaces

    Page(s): 26
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  • The advice business [Reflections]

    Page(s): 28
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  • Nuclear power after Fushima [Special report]

    Page(s): 30 - 33
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  • 24 hours at Fukushima

    Page(s): 35 - 42
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    Sometimes it takes a disaster before we humans really figure out how to design something. In fact, sometimes it takes more than one. Millions of people had to die on highways, for example, before governments forced auto companies to get serious about safety in the 1980s. But with nuclear power, learning by disaster has never really been an option. Or so it seemed, until officials found themselves grappling with the world's third major accident at a nuclear plant. On 11 March, a tidal wave set in motion a sequence of events that led to meltdowns in three reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi power station, 250 kilometers northeast of Tokyo. View full abstract»

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  • The post-Fukushima world

    Page(s): 44 - 45
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    The nuclear disaster at Fukushima Dai-ichi shocked the world. As radioactive particles floated into the air, a troubling question floated into people's minds: If such a disaster could happen in technologically advanced and cautious Japan, were their own countries packed with accidents waiting to happen? View full abstract»

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  • China doubles down

    Page(s): 46
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    China's surging economy runs mostly on coal, which slakes four-fifths of the country's thirst for electricity. And all over China, the consequences of that dependence are apparent: Its major cities are swathed in deadly smog, regional blackouts ensue when coal trains bog down on clogged rail networks, and coal mining routinely kills more than 2000 people a year. China desperately needs alternatives to coal-fired power. View full abstract»

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  • Germany folds

    Page(s): 47
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    Among major industrialized nations, Germany has long stood out for its deep ambivalence about nuclear power. So it wasn't much of a surprise when, two months after the Fukushima crisis began, Environment Minister Norbert Rottgen announced that Germany would shut down all its nuclear plants by 2022. And the phaseout began immediately: Rottgen declared that eight of the country??s oldest reactors, seven of which had been idled after Fukushima, would never go online again. View full abstract»

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  • What next for nuclear?

    Page(s): 48 - 49
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    We asked the experts how to build a safer and stronger nuclear industry View full abstract»

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  • Transistor wars

    Page(s): 50 - 66
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    Intel announced the most dramatic change to the architecture of the transistor since the device was invented. The company will henceforth build its transistors in three dimensions, a shift that-if all goes well-should add at least a half dozen years to the life of Moore's Law, the biennial doubling in transistor density that has driven the chip industry for decades. But Intel's big announcement was notable for another reason: It signaled the start of a growing schism among chipmakers. Despite all the great advantages of going 3-D, a simpler alternative design is also nearing production. Although it's not yet clear which device architecture will win out, what is certain is that the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) field-effect transistor (FET)-the centerpiece of computer processors since the 1980s-will get an entirely new look. And the change is more than cosmetic; these designs will help open up a new world of low-power mobile electronics with fantastic capabilities. View full abstract»

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  • Ticking to eternity

    Page(s): 54 - 62
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  • Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima

    Page(s): 92
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Susan Hassler
IEEE Spectrum Magazine