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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 1989

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • The telecommunications marketplace of the 1990s: new opportunities and new challenges

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 14 - 16
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    The challenges posed to the existing telecommunications providers, covering both telephone and cable television providers, by prospective changes in technology are addressed. The importance of competition, particularly in video distribution, is examined. The prospects for effective regulatory response in the USA to the current information-transmission environment are discussed.<> View full abstract»

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  • The NTIA Telecom 2000 report: charting the course for a new century

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 17 - 19
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    A comprehensive report on the communications policies that the US government should follow to ensure that national economic, government, and social needs are met in the year 2000 and beyond, released in October 1, 1988 by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), is discussed. The report, which is broad in scope, stresses the virtues of limited government involvement and maximum possible reliance on the private sector. It reviews the problems of simply transferring pro-competitive, deregulatory US policies from the domestic to the international communications arena. The report demonstrates how communications policy choices will affect a broad range of other topics, such as educational opportunities, the global competitiveness of American industry, and the quality of national life. The great importance of effectively competitive international communications and the trend toward liberalization in key overseas markets is also addressed.<> View full abstract»

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  • Global networks

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 20 - 21
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    The author discusses the global network for international communications being constructured by Cable and Wireless Ltd., entitled the Global Digital Highway (GDH), which will provide a digital, fiber-optic link connecting major commercial and financial centers around the world. He suggests that the world is waiting for basic global facilities that will be exclusively dedicated to facilitating international communications and networking. He examines the trend toward liberalization in telecommunications policies, led by the US, which has recently been joined by both the UK and Japan. He discusses the role of Cable and Wireless in the context of these liberalization policies.<> View full abstract»

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  • Breakup of AT&T and liberalization of the telecommunications business

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 22 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (183 KB)  

    The author argues that the present status and future direction of liberalization of the telecommunications business in the wake of the breakup of AT&T must be considered from two viewpoints. One viewpoint approaches the telecommunications business as a public business; the other approaches it as a means to promote, in various countries, advancement and diversification of universal telecommunications. In this context he evaluates the impact of the breakup on communication policy worldwide.<> View full abstract»

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  • Domestic roadblocks to a global information highway

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 24 - 25
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    The author examines the overall world business scene, identifying a clear shift toward loosening of restrictions that once made sense in a parochial world but that no longer serve global reality. He discusses restrictions on the regional holding companies in the US, describing them as roadblocks to a global information highway, and highlights some of the ways in which they are being circumvented.<> View full abstract»

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  • The effects of regulatory policy on the international telecommunications market

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 26 - 28
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    The author argues that though telecommunications is in a new era, the industry is operating in an environment designed for a past era in which government policies helped foster the expansion of national networks, built by monopolies that operated under varying degrees of oversight. He maintains that the transition from monopoly-based regulation to oversight of a competitive industry has gotten stuck somewhere in the middle, a no-man's-land called 'regulated competition', putting AT&T at a competitive disadvantage with its long-distance rivals. While some of the resulting marketplace distortions will clear up as regulatory rules are peeled away over time, he regards it as urgent that unnecessary and unneeded regulatory restraints be removed quickly, because they act as a drag on competitive response in an industry that is crucial to the global competitiveness of US business and industry. The author also examines the effect of government policies beyond the US shoreline on the competitiveness of US telecommunications in world markets.<> View full abstract»

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  • Investment in telecommunications: opportunities or pitfalls in today's environment

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 29 - 31
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    The author discusses the expanding telecommunication industry, emphasizing the competitive market for equipment that has sprung up in the wake of deregulation. He discusses the growth of technology, particularly fiber optics and computers, and its effect on long-distance service. He examines the impact that regulation has had on long-distance companies and considers the possible harm that further policy changes could have.<> View full abstract»

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  • The impact of divestiture and deregulation on technology and world markets [telecommunications]

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 32 - 34
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    The author separates the impact of deregulation from that of the divestiture of AT&T. He looks at the effect of deregulation on competition in the world market and the effect of both on technology, highlighting the area of mobile radio. He discusses briefly the effect on the US of opening of world markets.<> View full abstract»

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  • Telecommunications and the future

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 35 - 37
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    The effect of deregulation on the telecommunications industry and GTEs strategy in the resulting competitive environment are examined. The impact of increased competition on research and development efforts is discussed. The relationships among the US Congress, the Federal Communications Commission, and the industry are explored. Economic factors in a system that carries unregulated as well as regulated services and goals for the industry are considered.<> View full abstract»

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  • Government policy as to AT&T and the BOCs: the next 5 years

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 38 - 40
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    The author discusses the transition caused by the advent of competition and divestiture of AT&T. He predicts that in the next five years, that transitional period will probably end for AT&T, which would then be effectively deregulated, and that difficult transitional problems with the regional Bell Operating Companies (BOCs) will continue. He argues that US governmental policy in dealing with those problems will continue to be diffused and confused.<> View full abstract»

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  • Intellectual property reforms and international trade

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 41 - 42
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The intellectual property reforms relating to international trade contained in the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 are examined. These include improving process patent protection; obtaining exclusion orders from the International Trade Commission under Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, which has been made easier for intellectual property owners; broadening the power of the United States Trade Representative; and providing a more prominent role for intellectual property rights in US trade negotiations.<> View full abstract»

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  • US telecommunications policy: directions for the next five years

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 43 - 44
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The author highlights the intricacy and the importance of US telecommunications policy. He describes the telecommunications infrastructure, and discusses regulatory issues. He examines the impact of public policy on foreign trade.<> View full abstract»

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  • The changing face of US telecommunications trade policy

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 54 - 56
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    The author discusses the widely held belief that the US trade deficit as a whole and the telecommunications trade deficit in particular are due in large part to a perceived disparity between the US policy of promoting free trade and the allegedly protectionist policies adopted by foreign countries. Against this backdrop, he reviews a revealing exchange of correspondence between Federal Communications Commission Chairman Dennis Patrick and House Telecommunications Subcommittee Chairman Edward Markey that goes to the core of these issues.<> View full abstract»

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  • Adapting telecom regulation to industry change: promoting development without compromising ratepayer protection

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 57 - 65
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    The authors consider the role of regulation in the changing telecommunication industry. They first examine how regulation has functioned in the past and consider the role it has served up to now in the development of the industry. They then discuss industry proposals for regulatory reform and recent industry changes that make reform necessary. They explore the form that appropriate regulation might take in an evolving industry, with particular attention to pricing and its relation to costs, allocating costs for unregulated services, oversight of new services, and reducing the regulatory burden without abandoning regulatory protection.<> View full abstract»

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  • A systems approach for national telecommunications policy

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 66 - 70
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    It is argued that the arrival of the age of information networking in the US is being slowed by the patchwork of ground rules in the telecommunications industry, which prevents the open and universal provision of information networking and related services, and that a national policy is needed. The history of regulatory policy is reviewed, and the current situation is described. The importance of user needs and wants in setting policy is described, and the use of a systems approach is suggested.<> View full abstract»

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  • The regulatory challenge of broadband technologies

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 71 - 74
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The evolution of broadband technologies is described, focusing on fiber loops and broadband switching. Broadband service opportunities are briefly examined. It is contended that while most countries accept novel communications technology and rapidly integrate their benefits into public telecommunication networks, the micromanagement style prevalent in the USA precludes the provision of many services that will be possible through breakthroughs in broadband technology. To support this argument, the plans followed by Japan, France, West Germany, and the United Kingdom are presented and contrasted with the situation in the USA.<> View full abstract»

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  • Industry in transition: telecommunications-yesterday, today and tomorrow

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 75 - 76
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The changes that followed the divestiture of AT&T five years ago are examined. It is concluded that while the worst fears of competitors, regulators, and rate payers have not been realized, neither have the full benefits of an integrated information society. It is suggested that the primary reason for the lack of progress in realizing the public benefits of divestiture and deregulation is the failure of national telecommunications policymakers to jointly develop and agree on a vision for the USA telecommunications industry, and to articulate the policy goals required to fulfil that vision. The outlook for the next five years is discussed, stressing the importance of the public policy environment with respect to both regulation and international trade.<> View full abstract»

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  • The role of government policymakers (telecommunications industry)

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 77 - 80
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    The author examines the roles of the US President, the Federal Communications Commission, the Department of Justice and Judge Greene, and the Congress in the setting of public policy in the telecommunications/information industry. Both regulatory and trade policies are examined. The relevant provisions of the Omnibus Trade Bill of 1988 are summarized. It is predicted that tough regulatory times are ahead for the local exchange carriers.<> View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

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Editor-in-Chief
Osman Gebizlioglu
Huawei Technologies