Notification:
We are currently experiencing intermittent issues impacting performance. We apologize for the inconvenience.
By Topic

NanoBioscience, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Sept. 2011

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (142 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience publication information

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (39 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Influence of Size and Shape of Microorganism on Pulsed Electric Field Inactivation

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 133 - 138
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1017 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper the effect of microorganism size and shape on the killing efficiency of pulsed electric field (PEF) is investigated both experimentally and using a transient finite element program. The effect of cell size, membrane thickness, cell shape (spherical, elliptical, and cylindrical) on the calculated transmembrane voltage is studied. It has been found that both the cell size and cell membrane thickness have significant effect on the induced field across the cell membrane. The findings of the simulation results have been evaluated by comparing the trends with some experimental results. Five different types of microorganisms that have different shapes and dimensions have been inoculated with water at a conductivity level of 100 μS/cm and have been treated with the application of a pulsed electric field of 70 kV/cm. Significant difference in bacteria reduction was noticed between the treated cells which could be attributed to the cell size and shape. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A DNA-Based Algorithm for Minimizing Decision Rules: A Rough Sets Approach

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 139 - 151
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1627 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Rough sets are often exploited for data reduction and classification. While they are conceptually appealing, the techniques used with rough sets can be computationally demanding. To address this obstacle, the objective of this study is to investigate the use of DNA molecules and associated techniques as an optimization vehicle to support algorithms of rough sets. In particular, we develop a DNA-based algorithm to derive decision rules of minimal length. This new approach can be of value when dealing with a large number of objects and their attributes, in which case the complexity of rough-sets-based methods is NP-hard. The proposed algorithm shows how the essential components involved in the minimization of decision rules in data processing can be realized. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Ionic Channel Current Burst Analysis by a Machine Learning Based Approach

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 152 - 159
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (687 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A new method to analyze single ionic channel current conduction is presented. It is based on an automatic classification by K-means algorithm and on the concept of information entropy. This method is used to study the conductance of multistate ion current jumps induced by tetanus toxin in planar lipid bilayers. A comparison is presented with the widely used Gaussian best fit approach, whose main drawback is the fact that it is based on the manual choice of the base line and of meaningful fragments of current signal. On the contrary, the proposed method is able to automatically process a great amount of information and to remove spurious transitions and multichannels. The number of levels and their amplitudes do not have to be known a priori. In this way the presented method is able to produce a reliable evaluation of the conductance levels and their characteristic parameters in a short time. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Design of All-Optical Reconfigurable Logic Unit With Bacteriorhodopsin Protein Coated Microcavity Switches

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 160 - 171
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (613 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a theoretical design of an all-optical reconfigurable logic unit based on optically controlled microcavity switches, for realization of all-optical computing circuits. It can execute different logic and arithmetic operations such as half and full adder or subtractor, by only changing the control inputs on the same circuit. Theoretical designs considering bacteriorhodopsin (BR) protein coated microcavities in tree architecture have been presented. The combined advantages of high Q-factor, tunability, compactness, switching of near-IR signals at telecom wavelengths (1310/1550 nm) with low-power control signals, and flexibility of cascading switches to form circuits, makes the designs promising for practical applications. They combine the ultrahigh sensitivity of both BR and microresonators to define a novel paradigm of all-optical computing based on hybrid nanobiophotonic integration. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Power Law Behavior in IF Model With Random Excitatory and Inhibitory Rates

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 172 - 176
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (384 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A new mechanism is proposed to generate power law behavior in interspike interval (ISI) distribution when a collection of neurons group together and fire together. Employing superstatistical framework, the mechanism requires a population of neurons which is characterized by randomly distributed excitatory and inhibitory rates. The distribution of these rates is characterized by independent gamma variates. The effect of randomness in the rates exhibits power law behavior in first passage time of the integrate and fire (IF) model. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies of the underlying stochastic differential equation (SDE) are carried out which also depict asymptotically power law behavior for ISI distribution for an ensemble of IF neurons. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Pulsed Laser Coating of Hydroxyapatite/Titanium Nanoparticles on Ti-6Al-4V Substrates: Multiphysics Simulation and Experiments

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 177 - 186
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3048 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Pulsed laser coating (PLC) of bioceramics/metal nanomaterials on metal substrates was investigated in this research. It is found that due to the nature of the nanosized particles and pulse laser beam, PLC processed hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings possess strong coating/substrate interfacial bonding strength, and minimum thermal decomposition. Feasibility analysis of PLC is conducted using both simulation and experiments. In the multiphysics simulation, laser interacting with metal nanoparticles and heat conduction is simulated by coupling the electromagnetic (EM) module and heat transfer (HT) module. In experiments, HAp and titanium nanoparticle mixture are coated on Ti-6Al-4V substrate using nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser with wavelength of 1064 nm. Resulting temperature is measured by calibrated infrared (IR) camera and compared with simulation results. Experimental results agree well with simulation which serves as a guidance to find appropriate processing parameters. It is found that resulting temperature increases with increasing of pulse energy linearly and decreasing of pulse duration following the power law. It is recommended that shorter pulses to be used in PLC due to its better sinterability. Microstructure and chemical characterizations confirmed that HAp was physically and chemically maintained due to pulse laser caused rapid heating and cooling processes. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Supported Lipid Bilayers With Controlled Curvature via Colloidal Lithography

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 187 - 193
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1853 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) at surfaces provide a route to quantitatively study molecular interactions with and at lipid membranes via different surface-based analytical techniques. Here, a method to fabricate SLBs with controlled curvatures, in the nanometer regime over large areas, is presented, utilizing lipid vesicle rupture onto nanostructured sensor substrates. Heat treated colloidal particle masks were used as templates to produce silicon dioxide films with systematically varied radius of curvature (ROC, 70 to 170 nm are demonstrated) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) was used to confirm vesicle rupture onto such structured surfaces. Fluorescence microscopy was used to show fluidity of the supported membranes. The formation of confluent SLBs is demonstrated at the nanostructured surfaces from vesicles composed of POPC lipids. However, at surfaces with decreasing ROCs, vesicle rupture was hindered but with an increasing fraction of the positively charged lipid POEPC in the vesicles, it was possible to form good quality supported bilayers on all curvatures studied. Curved SLBs open up the possibility to systematically study the influence of curvature on molecular interactions at lipid membranes. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Negative Feedback Through mRNA Provides the Best Control of Gene-Expression Noise

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 194 - 200
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (375 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Genetically identical cell populations exposed to the same environment can exhibit considerable cell-to-cell variation in the levels of specific proteins. This variation or expression noise arises from the inherent stochastic nature of biochemical reactions that constitute gene expression. Negative feedback loops are common motifs in gene networks that reduce expression noise and intercellular variability in protein levels. Using stochastic models of gene expression we here compare different feedback architectures in their ability to reduce stochasticity in protein levels. A mathematically controlled comparison shows that in physiologically relevant parameter regimes, feedback regulation through the mRNA provides the best suppression of expression noise. Consistent with our theoretical results we find negative feedback loops though the mRNA in essential eukaryotic genes, where feedback is mediated via intron-derived microRNAs. Finally, we find that contrary to previous results, protein-mediated translational regulation may not always provide significantly better noise suppression than protein-mediated transcriptional regulation. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Isolated Photosystem I Reaction Centers on a Functionalized Gated High Electron Mobility Transistor

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 201 - 208
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1464 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In oxygenic plants, photons are captured with high quantum efficiency by two specialized reaction centers (RC) called Photosystem I (PS I) and Photosystem II (PS II). The captured photon triggers rapid charge separation and the photon energy is converted into an electrostatic potential across the nanometer-scale ( ~ 6 nm) reaction centers. The exogenous photovoltages from a single PS I RC have been previously measured using the technique of Kelvin force probe microscopy (KFM). However, biomolecular photovoltaic applications require two-terminal devices. This paper presents for the first time, a micro-device for detection and characterization of isolated PS I RCs. The device is based on an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure. AlGaN/GaN HEMTs show high current throughputs and greater sensitivity to surface charges compared to other field-effect devices. PS I complexes immobilized on the floating gate of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs resulted in significant changes in the device characteristics under illumination. An analytical model has been developed to estimate the RCs of a major orientation on the functionalized gate surface of the HEMTs. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • CdSe/CdS Semiconductor Quantum Rods as Robust Fluorescent Probes for Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Imaging

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 209 - 215
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (867 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Immunofluorescence techniques on formalin fixed paraffin-embedded sections allow for the evaluation of the expression and spatial distribution of specific markers in patient tissue specimens or for monitoring the fate of labeled cells after in vivo injection. This technique suffers however from the auto-fluorescence background signal of the embedded tissue that eventually confounds the analysis. Here we show that rod-like semiconductor nanocrystals (QRs), intramuscularly injected in living mice, could be clearly detected by confocal microscopy in formalin fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections. Despite the low amount of QRs amount injected (25 picomoles), these were clearly visible after 24 h in the muscle sections and their fluorescence signal was stronger than that of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) similarly functionalized and in the case of QRs only, the signal lasted even after 21 days after the injection. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Why we joined ... [advertisement]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 216
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (205 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience information for authors

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (25 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Blank page [back cover]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (5 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience publishes basic and applied papers dealing both with engineering, physics, chemistry, modeling and computer science and with biology and medicine with respect to molecules, cells, tissues. The content of acceptable papers ranges from practical/clinical/environmental applications to formalized mathematical theory.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Henry Hess
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Columbia University