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Potentials, IEEE

Issue 5 • Date Sept.-Oct. 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): C1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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  • Masthead

    Page(s): 2
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  • [Editorial]

    Page(s): 3
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  • [The Way Ahead]

    Page(s): 3 - 14
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  • Social Wrangling on the Wild, Wild Web

    Page(s): 4
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  • The Early Age of Social Computing

    Page(s): 5 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2067 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The social computing applications of today are a constant of everyday life, connecting people on a local to global scale. With a large variety of computer and display choices now available and a number of communication companies to provide their interconnect services, users can download thousands of application packages to meet their individual needs. This ease of entering the social computing market has been the result of an evolutionary process over the past 50 years. View full abstract»

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  • The Art of War

    Page(s): 9 - 14
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    In the dead of night, with their parents asleep, two brothers set out with the latest in cutting-edge technology to assist the benevolent Lord British in expelling the demonic machine known as Exodus from the lands of Sosaria. The year was 1983 and, armed with an Atari 800 8-b computer, the boys swapped turns at the keyboard conquering Origin Systems' classic roleplaying game (RPG) Ultima III: Exodus. View full abstract»

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  • WikiTeams: How Do They Achieve Success?

    Page(s): 15 - 20
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (842 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Web 2.0 technology and so-called social media are among the most popular (among users and researchers alike) Internet technologies today. Among them, Wiki technology - created to simplify HTML editing and enable open, collaborative editing of pages by ordinary Web users - occupies an important place. Wiki is increasingly adopted by businesses as a useful form of knowledge management and sharing, creating “corporate Wikis.” However, the most widely known application of Wiki technology - Wikipedia - is, according to many analysts, more than just an open encyclopedia that uses Wiki. View full abstract»

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  • Player and Team Performance in Everquest II and Halo 3

    Page(s): 21 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2218 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The market for video games has skyrocketed over the past decade. In the United States alone, the video game industry in 2009 generated almost US$20 billion in sales. Furthermore, according to Lenhart et al. (2008), an estimated 97% of the teenage population and 53% of the adult population are regular game players. Massively multiplayer online games (MMOGs) have become increasingly popular and amassed communities comprised of over 47 million subscribers by the year 2008. MMOGs are online spaces providing users with comprehensive virtual universes, each with its own unique context and mechanics. They range from the fantastical world of elves, dwarfs, and humans to space faring corporations and mirrors of our world. Large numbers of users interact and role-play via in-game mechanics. View full abstract»

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  • Leadership and Success Factors in Online Creative Collaboration

    Page(s): 27 - 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1022 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Social computing systems have enabled new and "wildly successful forms of creative collaboration to take place. Two of the best-known examples are Wikipedia and the open-source software (OSS) movement. Wikipedia, the free online encyclopedia, boasts millions of articles (over 3-6 million just in English) written by thousands of volunteers col laborating via the Internet. The OSS movement, also fueled mainly by volun teer online collaboration, has produced some of the "world's most powerful and important software applications, includ ing the Apache HTTP Server, the Linux operating system, and the Mozilla Firefox Web browser. Many Wikipedia articles and OSS projects have been demon strated to be equal or superior in quality to their commercial competitors. But how is this possible? Why do online col laborations like these succeed, and what lessons can we learn from them? View full abstract»

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  • Gamesman solutions

    Page(s): 32
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  • Intelligence in Human Computation Games

    Page(s): 33 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (746 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Human computation is a field that studies the employment of humans' computing ability to solve complex problems that computers cannot easily solve in time. Games present one plat form for human computation in an entertaining manner. Pioneered by Luis Von Ahn and his colleagues, many games "with a purpose (GWAP) systems have been developed in recent years, such as ESP, GWAP for the Semantic Web, and CityExplorer. Computational tasks, including image tagging, building the Semantic Web, and collecting geo spatial data for cities, are "crowd sourced" to the players and solved by human power. View full abstract»

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  • Guanxi in the Chinese Web-A Study of Mutual Linking

    Page(s): 35 - 41
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2086 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The internet industry in china has developed at an impressive rate over the past decade. According to a survey from the China Internet Network Information Center, by June 2010, the number of Internet users in China had reached 420 million. The Internet penetration rate in China remains low, with the majority of the Internet users being young urban students (ages 18-30) in cities such as Beijing and Shanghai. View full abstract»

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  • Beyond the Share Button: Making Social Network Sites Work for Health and Wellness

    Page(s): 42 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (654 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This research highlights many challenges and opportunities with using Facebook to support health and wellness. Though the author do not have answers to all of the questions the author outlined at the beginning of this article, the work by the author and others helps researchers and practitioners better understand how social network sites can work for wellness, as well as some of the barriers to successful health or wellness interactions on these sites. There remains much work to do, however. Finally, though advancing some of these research challenges may enable building systems that better support health and wellness behaviors or behavior change, designers of these systems should constantly ask what it "would be like to live with these systems. Systems that have been optimized to nudge or even push individuals to change their behavior-even when those individuals are explicitly pursuing those behavior changes-may lead to small individual health victories or progress toward societal goals at some cost to individual experiences and choices. View full abstract»

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  • Gamesman problems

    Page(s): 48
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  • 2011 Student Activities Committee E-mail Addresses

    Page(s): 49
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  • IEEE Media Advertising Sales Offices

    Page(s): 49
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Potentials is the magazine dedicated to undergraduate and graduate students and young professionals.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
David Tian
Carnegie Mellon University
david.tian@ieee.org