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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 6 • Date June 1993

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Corrigendum for 'Constraint-based automatic test data generation' by R.A. DeMillo and A.J. Offutt

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    In reference to the above-titled paper by R.A. DeMillo and A.J. Offutt (see ibid., vol.17, no.9, p.900-10, Sept. 1991), the commenter rates that he and M.R. Woodward (1985) implemented a system for FORTRAN-77 programs that integrates weak mutation and data flow analysis. He reports here that experiments have been carried out by them (1986), using the system to compare the error exposing ability of weak mutation, data flow, and control flow testing strategies.<> View full abstract»

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  • Correction to 'A4 logic-based approach to reverse engineering tools production (Dec 92 1053-1064)

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    A typographic error in rule 10 in the above-titled paper (see ibid., vol.18, no.12, p.1053-64, Dec. 1992), is corrected.<> View full abstract»

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  • Accessing files in an Internet: the Jade file system

    Page(s): 613 - 624
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    The Jade file system, which provides a uniform way to name and access files in an Internet environment, is introduced. Jade is a logical system that integrates a heterogeneous collection of existing file systems in which underlying file systems support different file access protocols. Because of autonomy, Jade is designed under the restriction that the underlying file systems may not be modified. In order to avoid the complexity of maintaining an Internet-wide, global name space, Jade permits each user to define a private name space. Jade's name space supports two features: it allows multiple file systems to be mounted under one directory, and it permits one logical name space to mount other logical name spaces. A prototype of Jade has been implemented to examine and validate its design. The prototype consists of interfaces to the Unix File System, the Sun Network File System, and the File Transfer Protocol. An overview of Jade's design is reported, and the authors' experiences in designing and implementing a large scale file system are reviewed View full abstract»

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  • Use of common time base for checkpointing and rollback recovery in a distributed system

    Page(s): 571 - 583
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    An approach to checkpointing and rollback recovery in a distributed computing system using a common time base is proposed. A common time base is established in the system using a hardware clock synchronization algorithm. This common time base is coupled with the idea of pseudo-recovery points to develop a checkpointing algorithm that has the following advantages: reduced wait for commitment for establishing recovery lines, fewer messages to be exchanged, and less memory requirement. These advantages are assessed quantitatively by developing a probabilistic model View full abstract»

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  • From CSP models to Markov models

    Page(s): 554 - 570
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    It is shown how a probabilistic dependability model of a safety-critical system can be derived from a trace-based functional model of the system. The functional model is a communicating sequential process (CSP) that includes command, failure, and repair events. The dependability model is a time homogeneous Markov process with transitions determined by these events. The method applies to deterministic systems that can be described in terms of a finite number of states and in which all event occurrences are stochastic with exponential time distribution. The derivation is carried out in two steps. An algorithmic determination is made of a finite automaton from the specification of the CSP process. The automaton is transformed into a Markov process. The Markov model for this system is used to determine the waiting time to terminal failure. The theory is applied to a larger and more realistic example: a gas burner system operating in the on-off mode. For this system, the waiting time to terminal failure is calculated, and the number of failures per year in a large population of identical, independently operated systems is estimated View full abstract»

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  • An analysis of test data selection criteria using the RELAY model of fault detection

    Page(s): 533 - 553
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    RELAY is a model of faults and failures that defines failure conditions, which describe test data for which execution will guarantee that a fault originates erroneous behavior that also transfers through computations and information flow until a failure is revealed. This model of fault detection provides a framework within which other testing criteria's capabilities can be evaluated. Three test data selection criteria that detect faults in six fault classes are analyzed. This analysis shows that none of these criteria is capable of guaranteeing detection for these fault classes and points out two major weaknesses of these criteria. The first weakness is that the criteria do not consider the potential unsatisfiability of their rules. Each criterion includes rules that are sufficient to cause potential failures for some fault classes, yet when such rules are unsatisfiable, many faults may remain undetected. Their second weakness is failure to integrate their proposed rules View full abstract»

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  • Regeneration with virtual copies for distributed computing systems

    Page(s): 594 - 602
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    The authors consider the consistency control problem for replicated data in a distributed computing system (DCS) and propose a new algorithm to dynamically regenerate copies of data objects in response to node failures and network partitioning in the system. The DCS is assumed to have strict consistency constraints for data object copies. The algorithm combines the advantages of voting-based algorithms and regeneration mechanisms to maintain mutual consistency of replicated data objects in the case of node failures and network partitioning. The algorithm extends the feasibility of regeneration to DCS on wide area networks and is able to satisfy user queries as long as there is one current partition in the system. A stochastic availability analysis of the algorithm shows that it provides improved availability as compared to previously proposed dynamic voting algorithms View full abstract»

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  • Software project control: an experimental investigation of judgment with fallible information

    Page(s): 603 - 612
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    Software project management is becoming an increasingly critical task in many organizations. While the macro-level aspects of project planning and control have been addressed extensively, there is a serious lack of research on the micro-empirical analysis of individual decision making behavior. The heuristics deployed to cope with the problems of poor estimation and poor visibility that hamper software project planning and control are investigated, and the implications for software project management are examined. A laboratory experiment in which subjects managed a simulated software development project is reviewed. The subjects were given project status information at different stages of the lifecycle and had to assess software productivity in order to dynamically readjust project plans. A conservative anchoring and adjustment heuristic is shown to explain the subjects' decisions quite well. Implications for software project planning and control are presented View full abstract»

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  • A rely and guarantee method for timed CSP: a specification and design of a telephone exchange

    Page(s): 625 - 639
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    A rely and guarantee method for timed communicating sequential processes (TCPSs), by which the behavior of a component belonging to a composite system is specified in terms of what it guarantees to its neighbors and what it relies on from them, is described. The method is illustrated using an overview of the specification of a plain old telephone service together with part of a design that provably satisfies this specification. The specification and design deal with safety, liveness, and troublesome race conditions View full abstract»

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  • A unified interprocedural program representation for a maintenance environment

    Page(s): 584 - 593
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    Unified interprocedural graph (UIG) that extracts the important features of existing program representations and adds new information to provide an integrated representation for maintenance tasks is presented. Algorithms that were developed for previous representations are adapted to use the UIG by identifying the subset of nodes and edges in the UIG required for that computation. Newly developed algorithms can use the UIG since it contains data flow, control flow, data dependence, and control dependence information. The main benefits of this approach are the reduction in storage space since individual representations are not kept, the savings in maintenance time of a single representation over the individual representations, and the convenience of accessing a single program representation without increase in access time. A single program representation also assists in program understanding since relationships among program elements are incorporated into one graph View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org