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Haptics, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date May-June 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • [Inside front cover]

    Page(s): c2
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  • Haptics in medicine and clinical skill acquisition [special section intro.]

    Page(s): 153 - 154
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Perception and Action in Teleoperated Needle Insertion

    Page(s): 155 - 166
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1066 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We studied the effect of delay on perception and action in contact with a force field that emulates elastic soft tissue with a rigid nonlinear boundary. Such a field is similar to forces exerted on a needle during teleoperated needle insertion. We found that delay causes motor underestimation of the stiffness of this nonlinear soft tissue, without perceptual change. These experimental results are supported by simulation of a simplified mechanical model of the arm and neural controller, and a model for perception of stiffness, which is based on regression in the force-position space. In addition, we show that changing the gain of the teleoperation channel cancels the motor effect of delay without adding perceptual distortion. We conclude that it is possible to achieve perceptual and motor transparency in virtual one-dimensional remote needle insertion task. View full abstract»

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  • Effect of Grip Force and Training in Unstable Dynamics on Micromanipulation Accuracy

    Page(s): 167 - 174
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1420 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper investigates whether haptic error amplification using unstable dynamics can be used to train accuracy in micromanipulation. A preliminary experiment first examines the possible confounds of visual magnification and grip force. Results show that micromanipulation precision is not affected by grip force in both naive and experienced subjects. On the other hand, precision is increased by visual magnification of up to 10×, but not further for larger magnifications. The main experiment required subjects to perform small-range point-to-point movements in 3D space in an unstable environment which amplified position errors to the straight line between start and end point. After having trained in this environment, subjects performing in the free conditions show an increase in success rate and a decrease in error and its standard deviation relative to the control subjects. This suggests that this technique can improve accuracy and reliability of movements during micromanipulation. View full abstract»

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  • Constraint-Based Haptic Rendering of Multirate Compliant Mechanisms

    Page(s): 175 - 187
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    The paper is dedicated to haptic rendering of complex physics-based environment in the context of surgical simulation. A new unified formalism for modeling the mechanical interactions between medical devices and anatomical structures and for computing accurately the haptic force feedback is presented. The approach deals with the mechanical interactions using appropriate force and/or motion transmission models named compliant mechanisms. These mechanisms are formulated as a constraint-based problem that is solved in two separate threads running at different frequencies. The first thread processes the whole simulation including the soft-tissue deformations, whereas the second one only deals with computer haptics. This method builds a bridge between the so-called virtual mechanisms (that were proposed for haptic rendering of rigid bodies) and intermediate representations (used for rendering of complex simulations). With this approach, it is possible to describe the specific behavior of various medical devices while relying on a unified method for solving the mechanical interactions between deformable objects and haptic rendering. The technique is demonstrated in interactive simulation of flexible needle insertion through soft anatomical structures with force feedback. View full abstract»

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  • Haptic Simulator for Prostate Brachytherapy with Simulated Needle and Probe Interaction

    Page(s): 188 - 198
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    This paper presents a haptic simulator for prostate brachytherapy. Both needle insertion and the manipulation of the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe are controlled via haptic devices. Tissue interaction forces that are computed by a deformable tissue model based on the finite element method (FEM) are rendered to the user by these devices. The needle insertion simulation employs 3D models of needle flexibility and asymmetric tip bevel. The needle-tissue simulation allows a trainee to practice needle insertion and targeting. The TRUS-tissue interaction simulation allows a trainee to practice the 3D intraoperative TRUS placement for registration with the preoperative volume study and to practice TRUS axial translation and rotation for imaging needles during insertions. Approaches to computational acceleration for realtime haptic performance are presented. Trade-offs between accuracy and speed are discussed. A graphics-card implementation of the numerically intensive mesh-adaptation operation is also presented. The simulator can be used for training, rehearsal, and treatment planning. View full abstract»

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  • Integrating Haptics with Augmented Reality in a Femoral Palpation and Needle Insertion Training Simulation

    Page(s): 199 - 209
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    This paper presents a virtual environment for training femoral palpation and needle insertion, the opening steps of many interventional radiology procedures. A novel augmented reality simulation called PalpSim has been developed that allows the trainees to feel a virtual patient using their own hands. The palpation step requires both force and tactile feedback. For the palpation haptics effect, two off-the-shelf force feedback devices have been linked together to provide a hybrid device that gives five degrees of force feedback. This is combined with a custom built hydraulic interface to provide a pulse like tactile effect. The needle interface is based on a modified PHANTOM Omni end effector that allows a real interventional radiology needle to be mounted and used during simulation. While using the virtual environment, the haptics hardware is masked from view using chroma-key techniques. The trainee sees a computer generated patient and needle, and interacts using their own hands. This simulation provides a high level of face validity and is one of the first medical simulation devices to integrate haptics with augmented reality. View full abstract»

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  • Tool Contact Acceleration Feedback for Telerobotic Surgery

    Page(s): 210 - 220
    Multimedia
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    Minimally invasive telerobotic surgical systems enable surgeons to perform complicated procedures without large incisions. Unfortunately, these systems typically do not provide the surgeon with sensory feedback aside from stereoscopic vision. We have, thus, developed VerroTouch, a sensing and actuating device that can be added to Intuitive Surgical's existing da Vinci S Surgical System to provide auditory and vibrotactile feedback of tool contact accelerations. These cues let the surgeon feel and hear contact with rough textures as well as the making and breaking of contact with objects and other tools. To evaluate the merits of this approach, we had 11 surgeons use an augmented da Vinci S to perform three in vitro manipulation tasks under four different feedback conditions: with no acceleration feedback, with audio feedback, with haptic feedback, and with both audio and haptic. Subjects expressed a significant preference for the inclusion of tool contact acceleration feedback, although they disagreed over which sensory modality was best. Other survey responses and qualitative written comments indicate that the feedback may have improved the subject's concentration and situational awareness by strengthening the connection between the surgeon and the surgical instruments. Analysis of quantitative task metrics shows that the feedback neither improves nor impedes the performance of the chosen tasks. View full abstract»

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  • Force, Torque, and Stiffness: Interactions in Perceptual Discrimination

    Page(s): 221 - 228
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (567 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Three experiments investigated whether force and torque cues interact in haptic discrimination of force, torque, and stiffness, and if so, how. The statistical relation between force and torque was manipulated across four experimental conditions: either one type of cue varied while the other was constant, or both varied so as to be positively correlated, negatively correlated, or uncorrelated. Experiment 1 showed that the subjects' ability to discriminate force was improved by positively correlated torque but impaired with uncorrelated torque, as compared to the constant torque condition. Corresponding effects were found in Experiment 2 for the influence of force on torque discrimination. These findings indicate that force and torque are integrated in perception, rather than being processed as separate dimensions. A further experiment demonstrated facilitation of stiffness discrimination by correlated force and torque, whether the correlation was positive or negative. The findings suggest new means of augmenting haptic feedback to facilitate perception of the properties of soft objects. View full abstract»

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  • ToH Information for authors

    Page(s): c3
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  • [Back cover]

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Haptics addresses the science, technology and applications associated with information acquisition and object manipulation through touch.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Lynette Jones
Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
77 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02139
USA
Phone: 617-253-3973
Fax: 617-253-2218
Email: ljones@mit.edu
Website: http://meche.mit.edu/people/index.html?id=128

Associate Editor-in-Chief
Cagatay Basdogan
Koc University
College of Engineering
Istanbul, 34450 Turkey
Phone: 902123381721