By Topic

Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Aug. 2011

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 24 of 24
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): C1 - C4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (118 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Education publication information

    Page(s): C2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (41 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Experiment-Based Teaching in Advanced Control Engineering

    Page(s): 345 - 355
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (446 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper discusses an experiment-based approach to teaching an advanced control engineering syllabus involving controlled plant analysis and modeling, control structures and algorithms, real-time laboratory experiments, and their assessment. These experiments are structured around the representative case of the longitudinal slip control of an antilock braking system (ABS). The basic and advanced control strategies that are experimentally studied include the proportional-integral (PI) control, gain scheduling, iterative feedback tuning (IFT) and fuzzy control. The final grades obtained by representative groups of students demonstrate the efficiency of a described hands-on laboratory experimental study of a complex antilock braking system as encountered in practice, which allowed students to gain a better understanding of the theoretical aspects learned during the lectures. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Spiral Step-by-Step Educational Method for Cultivating Competent Embedded System Engineers to Meet Industry Demands

    Page(s): 356 - 365
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1170 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Embedded system technologies are undergoing dramatic change. Competent embedded system engineers are becoming a scarce resource in the industry. Given this, universities should revise their specialist education to meet industry demands. In this paper, a spirally tight-coupled step-by-step educational method, based on an analysis of industry requirements, is proposed. The learning process consists of multiple learning circles piled up in a spiral. Each learning circle consists of three steps: lecture, demo, and hands-on practice, which are tight-coupled to enable students to readily revisit essential knowledge. The circle currently being studied is directly based on the previous circle, so as to maintain a smooth learning curve. Since students can quickly see the result of their work, their motivation to learn remains high. Since a learning circle takes only a short period to complete, the core knowledge and skills can be repeated in different forms across the three types of educational step so that students can master them. The students' achievement and performance using the proposed method show that it can enable them to master the requisite knowledge and effectively transform this into skills. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Transforming PC Power Supplies Into Smart Car Battery Conditioners

    Page(s): 366 - 373
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (447 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes a laboratory project consisting of a PC power supply modification into an intelligent car-battery conditioner with both wireless and wired networking capabilities. Adding a microcontroller to an average PC power supply transforms it into a flexible, intelligent device that can be configured and that is suitable to keep car batteries always ready to use. Using a high-performance microcontroller provides the product with wireless communication capabilities so it becomes a new network device that can be accessed through the Internet. This project allows students to improve their knowledge in several fields: power electronics, battery charging and conditioning, advanced microcontrollers, embedded Linux, and wireless communications. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Web-Based Learning Design for Adult Computer Science Courses

    Page(s): 374 - 380
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (83 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper reports on work undertaken within a pilot study concerned with the design, development, and evaluation of online computer science training courses. Drawing on recent developments in e-learning technology, these courses were structured around the principles of a learner-oriented approach for use with adult learners. The paper describes a methodological framework for the evaluation of three main educational issues involved in the learning process of Web-based computer science training courses, and analyzes the results of this study with the aim of providing an improved learning design, and environment, for these courses. The findings highlight a number of potential barriers to learning and indicate the failed indicators that need to be improved in order to enhance effective performance. The authors give their views both on ways to improve the proposed learning environment and on the need for an optimal balance between asynchronous and synchronous activities, enhanced collaboration, and interactions among adult learners and e-tutors. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Teaching Multimedia Data Protection Through an International Online Competition

    Page(s): 381 - 386
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (192 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Low-cost personal computers, wireless access technologies, the Internet, and computer-equipped classrooms allow the design of novel and complementary methodologies for teaching digital information security in electrical engineering curricula. The challenges of the current digital information era require experts who are effectively able to counteract piracy, forgery, copyright infringement, and so on. Digital watermarking is one possible technique for fighting piracy, which consists of the insertion of invisible but robust information to protect the data. In this paper, a new teaching approach, designed for testing student skills and progressing in multimedia data protection, is presented. This consists of a distributed security game where students compete by first using the developed watermarking techniques and then attacking each other's methods, thus verifying their robustness. Groups of students from different universities and countries play against each other, trying to compromise other teams' hiding systems while protecting their own data from attacks. The proposed methodology can be considered as an appealing approach for stimulating learning, cooperation, and team competition. The effectiveness of the teaching method is verified by a student survey and their academic results. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Marrying Content and Process in Computer Science Education

    Page(s): 387 - 397
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (730 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Constructivist approaches to computer science education emphasize that as well as knowledge, thinking skills and processes are involved in active knowledge construction. K-12 computer science curricula must not be based on fashions and trends, but on contents and processes that are observable in various domains of computer science, that can be taught at every intellectual level, that will stay relevant in the longer term, and that are related to everyday language and/or thinking. Only recently, two empirically determined lists, one of central content concepts (algorithm, computer, data, system, etc.) and another of central process concepts (problem solving and problem posing, analyzing, classifying, generalizing, etc.), have become available for computer science education. This paper tackles the problem of finding content and process concepts to be taught in combination. Computer science experts are surveyed in order to identify combinations of content and process concepts-so-called blocks-that are relevant to computer science education. By using cluster analyses, 15 central blocks for teaching computer science in schools are determined. The results of this study may serve as a reference system for the systematic design of instruction in K-12 computer science education. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • ADVICE—Educational System for Teaching Database Courses

    Page(s): 398 - 409
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (799 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a Web-based educational system, ADVICE, that helps students to bridge the gap between database management system (DBMS) theory and practice. The usage of ADVICE is presented through a set of laboratory exercises developed to teach students conceptual and logical modeling, SQL, formal query languages, and normalization. While working on the exercises, students use the system to access real databases, and the system provides them with feedback about their solutions. From the perspective of an instructor, the system allows easy exercise management and continual progress monitoring. The paper also describes a practical experience with the use of ADVICE on a database course over a three-year period. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Modular Approach for Teaching Partial Discharge Phenomenon Through Experiment

    Page(s): 410 - 415
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (315 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Partial discharge (PD) monitoring is an effective predictive maintenance tool for electrical power equipment. As a result, an understanding of the theory related to PD and the associated measurement techniques is now necessary knowledge for power engineers in their professional life. This paper presents a modular course on PD phenomenon in which the design experiences are distributed across different modules so that ABET criteria are met to a great extent. The teaching methodology involves delivering theoretical lectures on concepts related to PD and its measurements, along with laboratory experiments, assignments, open presentation, and so on. The evaluation methodology comprises examinations, both oral and written reports, and an assessment of the effectiveness of teamwork and of the course itself by means of student feedback. Analysis of student feedback showed that the students liked the course and felt it would be helpful for their professional advancement. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Game-Themed Programming Assignment Modules: A Pathway for Gradual Integration of Gaming Context Into Existing Introductory Programming Courses

    Page(s): 416 - 427
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2932 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Despite the proven success of using computer video games as a context for teaching introductory programming (CS1/2) courses, barriers including the lack of adoptable materials, required background expertise (in graphics/games), and institutional acceptance still prevent interested faculty members from experimenting with this approach. Game-themed programming assignment (GTA) modules are designed specifically for these faculty members. The GTA modules are independent, and each is a self-contained game-like programming assignment that challenges students on concepts pertaining to a specific curriculum topic area. A faculty member can selectively pick and choose a subset of GTA modules to experiment with and gradually adopt the materials in his or her own classes. Each GTA module also includes a step-by-step tutorial guide that supports and encourages interested faculty to develop their own expertise and game-themed materials. This paper begins with a survey of previous results. Based on this survey, the paper summarizes the important considerations when designing materials for selective adoption. The paper then describes the design, implementation, and assessment of the GTA modules. The results from ongoing GTA workshops for CS1/2 faculty members and from a yearlong project in adopting the GTA modules in classes are then presented. In this case, the collected results verified that introductory programming concepts can be examined, practiced, and learned by means of GTA modules when neither the faculty nor the students involved have backgrounds in graphics or games. More importantly, these results demonstrated that it is straightforward to blend the GTA modules into existing classes with minimum alterations. In these ways, the GTA modules are excellent catalysts enabling faculty to begin exploring and developing their own expertise and materials to teach with games. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An Undergraduate Nanotechnology Engineering Laboratory Course on Atomic Force Microscopy

    Page(s): 428 - 441
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1656 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada, is home to North America's first undergraduate program in nanotechnology. As part of the Nanotechnology Engineering degree program, a scanning probe microscopy (SPM)-based laboratory has been developed for students in their fourth year. The one-term laboratory course “Nanoprobing and Lithography” is accompanied by a preceding one-term lecture course, “Nanoprobing and Lithography.” The lecture course lays the theoretical foundation for the concepts covered in the laboratory course. The students work in groups of two and obtain hands-on experience in biweekly 3-h laboratory sessions. The labs use a dedicated undergraduate SPM teaching facility consisting of five atomic force microscope stations. The laboratory course covers all common standard modes of operation, as well as force spectroscopy, electrostatic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, and scanning probe lithography by electrochemical oxidation and scratching/ploughing of resist. In light of the breadth of the nanotechnology engineering educational program in terms of synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials, the authors designed a dedicated SPM lab with a capacity of up to 130 students per term. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Students' Involvement in Continuous Assessment Methodologies: A Case Study for a Distributed Information Systems Course

    Page(s): 442 - 451
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1027 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The creation of the new European Higher Education Area (EHEA), with the corresponding changes in the structure and content of university degrees, offers a great opportunity to review learning methodologies. This paper investigates the effect on students of moving from a traditional learning process, based on lectures and laboratory work, to an approach closer to continuous evaluation. To this end, various types of weekly assessments were included in a Distributed Information Systems course; these assessments and the teacher's feedback were both intended to increase students' participation in the learning process. Data for seven academic years have been compiled, representing a total of more than 750 students. Analysis of the results established that most students preferred to participate in the course following the new methodology. Although both the pass rate and the final students' grades improved, the percentage of students dropping out of the course increased slightly. The impact of carrying out the proposed assessments was the same, regardless of gender and whether the student had taken this course before. In addition, compulsory attendance at office hours did not impact the degree of student participation in the new methodology. Finally, it was found that the greater (more continuous) effort demanded by the new methodology had an effect on the teacher's evaluation, whose scores were slightly lower with the new methodology, even though the students' performed better. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Control Systems Lab Using a LEGO Mindstorms NXT Motor System

    Page(s): 452 - 461
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (529 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper introduces a low-cost LEGO Mindstorms NXT motor system for teaching classical and modern control theories in standard third-year undergraduate courses. The LEGO motor system can be used in conjunction with MATLAB, Simulink, and several necessary toolboxes to demonstrate: 1) a modeling technique; 2) proportional-integral-differential (PID) control; and 3) state feedback control and estimator design. This paper describes the use of these demonstrations during three lab sessions and illustrates their usefulness for helping students to understand the modeling and control systems theories. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Effects of Interdisciplinary Education on Technology-Driven Application Design

    Page(s): 462 - 470
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (270 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the structure and the underlying rationale of a new course dedicated to capability maturity model integration (CMMI)-directed design of wireless sensor networks (WSNs)-based biomedical applications that stresses: 1) engineering-, medico-engineering-, and informatics-related issues; 2) design for general- and special-purpose systems; and 3) the creation of synergistic effects that enable formation of entrepreneurial multidisciplinary teams able to organize and implement the development of these health-related pervasive computing applications. Formal education so far still focuses on treating only strictly separated and specialized topic areas. However, as the need for cooperation and mutual learning between students oriented toward different fields grows, the need for a multidisciplinary educational approach becomes more and more important. For a technical education to be complete, it is no longer enough to train scientists and engineers solely in technical areas. In development and implementation of technology-driven applications, multidisciplinary issues should be properly addressed in the academic sense. The interdisciplinary understanding and synergy achieved are tested through examinations and workshops. The transdisciplinary knowledge improvement is also statistically evaluated, using a system of metrics developed experimentally. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • How Blended Learning Reduces Underachievement in Higher Education: An Experience in Teaching Computer Sciences

    Page(s): 471 - 478
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (469 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a blended learning approach and a study evaluating instruction in a software engineering-related course unit as part of an undergraduate engineering degree program in computing. In the past, the course unit had a lecture-based format. In view of student underachievement and the high course unit dropout rate, a distance-learning system was deployed, where students were allowed to choose between a distance-learning approach driven by a moderate constructivist instructional model or a blended-learning approach. The results of this experience are presented, with the aim of showing the effectiveness of the teaching/learning system deployed compared to the lecture-based system previously in place. The grades earned by students under the new system, following the distance-learning and blended-learning courses, are compared statistically to the grades attained in earlier years in the traditional face-to-face classroom (lecture-based) learning. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Computer-Aided Teaching Using MATLAB/Simulink for Enhancing an IM Course With Laboratory Tests

    Page(s): 479 - 491
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1683 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes an automatic procedure using MATLAB software to plot the circle diagram for two induction motors (IMs), with wound and squirrel-cage rotors, from no-load and blocked-rotor tests. The advantage of this approach is that it avoids the need for a direct load test in predetermining the IM characteristics under reduced power. Additionally, to verify the validity of the equivalent circuit parameters deduced from experimental tests, these characteristics are used to simulate virtual machines implemented under Simulink/PSB models. Furthermore, a virtual load test is performed to validate the proposed model. Finally, the results are given of an assessment that reflects the positive impact the proposed methods have had on students' learning experience in electrical machinery courses in the Electrotechnics Department, Engineer Sciences Faculty, University Mentouri of Constantine (ED-ESF-UMC), Algeria. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Augmented Reality for the Improvement of Remote Laboratories: An Augmented Remote Laboratory

    Page(s): 492 - 500
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1187 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Augmented reality (AR) provides huge opportunities for online teaching in science and engineering, as these disciplines place emphasis on practical training and unsuited to completely nonclassroom training. This paper proposes a new concept in virtual and remote laboratories: the augmented remote laboratory (ARL). ARL is being tested in the first and second years of the new degrees in industrial engineering and computer engineering, respectively, at the School of Engineering, University of Huelva, Huelva, Spain. By means of augmented reality techniques, ARL allows the student to experience sensations and explore learning experiences that, in some cases, may exceed those offered by traditional laboratory classes. The effectiveness of this methodology for remote laboratory work is evaluated by comparing it to practical sessions in the laboratory at the university itself with the same group of students. Students completed a questionnaire after having experienced both types of practicals, and the results show that the use of ARL improves student outcomes. As discussed in the paper, the potential of AR to configure different experiments from the same physical configuration is virtually limitless. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Effects of Response-Driven Feedback in Computer Science Learning

    Page(s): 501 - 508
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (551 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents the results of a project on generating diagnostic feedback for guided learning in a first-year course on programming and a Master's course on software quality. An online multiple-choice questions (MCQs) system is integrated with neural network-based data analysis. Findings about how students use the system suggest that the feedback is effective in addressing the level of knowledge of the individual and guiding him/her toward a greater understanding of particular concepts. In contrast, there is no evidence that learning required in programming problems, where students develop higher-level thinking according to Bloom's taxonomy, was exercised by using MCQs. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An Approach to Average Modeling and Simulation of Switch-Mode Systems

    Page(s): 509 - 517
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1337 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper suggests a pedagogical approach to teaching the subject of average modeling of PWM switch-mode power electronics systems through simulation by general-purpose electronic circuit simulators. The paper discusses the derivation of PSPICE/ORCAD-compatible average models of the switch-mode power stages, their software implementation, and fast time-domain, frequency-domain, and stability analysis simulation techniques suitable for virtual study of complex switch-mode feedback systems. The proposed approach is demonstrated by a simulation example. The methodology is oriented toward Electrical Engineering students at the undergraduate level, enrolled in courses such as “Power Electronics,” “Industrial Electronics,” or the like. The paper can be helpful to instructors of a “Virtual Power Electronics Laboratory” course wanting to conduct a software experiment on dynamics of switch-mode power converter systems. Engineers and scientists approaching the task of simulation of switch-mode systems can also find the suggested technique useful. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Corrections to “An Approach to Average Modeling and Simulation of Switch-Mode Systems” [Aug 11 509-517]

    Page(s): 518
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (101 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Presents some corrections to the above titled paper (ibid., vol. 54, no. 3, pp. 509-517, Aug. 2011). View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • IEEE-RITA

    Page(s): 519
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (150 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Foundation [advertisement]

    Page(s): 520
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (320 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Education information for authors

    Page(s): C3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (32 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University