By Topic

Electrical Insulation Magazine, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date July-August 2011

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • IEEE Electrical Insulation Magazine

    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (71 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Electrical Insulation Magazine

    Page(s): 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (91 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Editorial

    Page(s): 4 - 5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (2624 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • From the editors' desk

    Page(s): 6 - 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (197 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A review of dielectric polymer composites with high thermal conductivity

    Page(s): 8 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1201 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The continuing miniaturization of electronic devices and the increasing power output of electrical equipment have created new challenges in packaging and insulating materials. The key goals are to develop materials with high thermal conductivity, low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), low dielectric con stant, high electrical resistivity, high breakdown strength, and most importantly, low cost. Polymeric materials have attracted increasing interest because of their excellent processability and low cost; however, most polymers are thermally insulating and have a thermal conductivity between 0.1 and 0.5 W-m-ι-K"1. One approach to increase the thermal conductivity of a polymer is to introduce high-thermal-conductivity fillers, such as aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, boron nitride, silicon nitride, beryllium oxide, or diamond. In this review paper, we explore how dielectric polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have been developed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Effects of high-dose gamma ray irradiation on the physicochemical properties and water-treeing deterioration of cross-linked polyethylene cable insulation

    Page(s): 17 - 25
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1235 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The article aims to explain how gamma ray irradiation influences the physicochemical properties and morphological characteristics of cross-linked polyethylene cable insulation and to show experimentally the influence of the radiation dosage on water-treeing behavior in cross-linked polyethylene cable insulation. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Monitoring off-line and on-line PD under impulsive voltage on induction motors - Part 3: Criticality

    Page(s): 26 - 33
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (500 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article is the last of three on the subject. A summary of the three articles appears in the proceedings of the ISEI conference, held in San Diego, June 6-9, 2010. The series is being published in the magazine to provide a comprehensive description of the work and for a wider distribution. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • On-site diagnostics of medium-voltage underground cross-linked polyethylene cables

    Page(s): 34 - 44
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2751 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The polarization-depolarization current measurements were performed on miniature cables (aged in the laboratory), field-aged cables (removed from service and measured in the laboratory), and cables still installed in the local utility power distribution network. The measurements performed on miniature cables revealed significant changes in the area Qp under the HF components of the polarization current with aging time. The percentage increase of Qp could be related to the degree of insulation degradation due to water treeing. The low-frequency component of the depolarization current for field-aged cables was sensitive to polarization time but only when the measurements were performed shortly after switching off of the ac voltage. Virgin and relatively new cables did not show this effect. Cables of similar age and construction but installed in different environments (e.g., in conduits vs. bare ground) gave distinctly different depolarization current waveforms, which indicates that the technique can distinguish the more deteriorated from the less deteriorated cables. An extra year of service caused noticeable changes in the insulation depolarization current characteristics for some cables and almost no change in others. A large change in depolarization current could indicate advancing deterioration of the insulation and increasing probability of failure. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A short history of rubber cables

    Page(s): 45 - 50
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (541 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Rubber cables date back to the earliest electrical infrastructure, the tele graph, and have dominated industrial infrastructure to the present. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Obituary [Professor Jen-Shih Chang]

    Page(s): 51
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (222 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • DEIS news

    Page(s): 52
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (51 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • SABIC Innovative Plastics' newest extem UH resin meets higher continuous use temperatures and greater design freedom [New Products]

    Page(s): 54
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (46 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Development of an advanced solid oxide fuel cell in Japan [News from Japan]

    Page(s): 55 - 57
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (642 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Book reviews [8 books reviewed]

    Page(s): 58 - 62
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (102 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE media advertising sales offices

    Page(s): 63
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (191 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Meetings calendar

    Page(s): 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (173 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Electrical Insulation Magazine - Front cover

    Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (264 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Author's guide

    Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (38 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • DEIS videotapes

    Page(s): c3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (48 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The EI Magazine is specifically concerned with publishing articles in the development and characterization of the dielectric, chemical, mechanical, and environmental properties of all vacuum, gaseous, liquid, and solid electrical insulation, and with utilization of these materials in circuits and systems under conditions of use.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Co-Editor-in-Chief
Edward Cherney

Co-Editor-in-Chief
Robert Fleming