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Information Technology in Biomedicine, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date July 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 27
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C1 - CC
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  • IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine publication information

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C2
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 501 - 502
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  • Guest Editorial Sensing and Computing in Wearable Robots

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 503 - 504
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (101 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The goal of this special session is to present original and relevant contributions in the area of information sensing and computing for control of or communication with wearable robots in medical applications. View full abstract»

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  • Motor Unit Number Reductions in Paretic Muscles of Stroke Survivors

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 505 - 512
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (521 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The objective of this study is to assess whether there is evidence of spinal motoneuron loss in paretic muscles of stroke survivors, using an index measurement called motor unit number index (MUNIX). MUNIX, a recently developed novel neurophysiological technique, provides an index proportional to the number of motor units in a muscle, but not necessarily an accurate absolute count. The MUNIX technique was applied to the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle bilaterally in nine stroke subjects. The area and power of the maximum M-wave and the interference pattern electromyogram (EMG) at different contraction levels were used to calculate the MUNIX. A motor unit size index (MUSizelndex) was also calculated using maximum M-wave recording and the MUNIX values. We observed a significant decrease in both maximum M-wave amplitude and MUNIX values in the paretic FDI muscles, as compared with the contralateral muscles. Across all subjects, the maximum M-wave amplitude was 6.4 ± 2.3 mV for the paretic muscles and 9.7 ± 2.0 mV for the contralateral muscles (p <; 0.001). These measurements, in combination with voluntary EMG recordings, resulted in the MUNIX value of 109 ± 53 for the paretic muscles, much lower than the MUNIX value of 153 ± 38 for the contralateral muscles (p <; 0.01). No significant difference was found in MUSizelndex values between the paretic and contralateral muscles. However, the range of MUSizelndex values was slightly wider for paretic muscles (48.8-93.3 μV) than the contralateral muscles (51.7-84.4 μV). The findings from the index measurements provide further evidence of spinal motoneuron loss after a hemispheric brain lesion. View full abstract»

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  • Ubiquitous Human Upper-Limb Motion Estimation using Wearable Sensors

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 513 - 521
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (593 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Human motion capture technologies have been widely used in a wide spectrum of applications, including interactive game and learning, animation, film special effects, health care, navigation, and so on. The existing human motion capture techniques, which use structured multiple high-resolution cameras in a dedicated studio, are complicated and expensive. With the rapid development of microsensors-on-chip, human motion capture using wearable microsensors has become an active research topic. Because of the agility in movement, upper-limb motion estimation has been regarded as the most difficult problem in human motion capture. In this paper, we take the upper limb as our research subject and propose a novel ubiquitous upper-limb motion estimation algorithm, which concentrates on modeling the relationship between upper-arm movement and forearm movement. A link structure with 5 degrees of freedom (DOF) is proposed to model the human upper-limb skeleton structure. Parameters are defined according to Denavit-Hartenberg convention, forward kinematics equations are derived, and an unscented Kalman filter is deployed to estimate the defined parameters. The experimental results have shown that the proposed upper-limb motion capture and analysis algorithm outperforms other fusion methods and provides accurate results in comparison to the BTS optical motion tracker. View full abstract»

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  • Real-Time Upper Limb Motion Estimation From Surface Electromyography and Joint Angular Velocities Using an Artificial Neural Network for Human–Machine Cooperation

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 522 - 530
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (773 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A current challenge with human-machine cooperation systems is to estimate human motions to facilitate natural cooperation and safety of the human. It is a logical approach to estimate the motions from their sources (skeletal muscles); thus, we employed surface electromyography (SEMG) to estimate body motions. In this paper, we investigated a cooperative manipulation control by an upper limb motion estimation method using SEMG and joint angular velocities. The SEMG signals from five upper limb muscles and angular velocities of the limb joints were used to approximate the flexion-extension of the limb in the 2-D sagittal plane. The experimental results showed that the proposed estimation method provides acceptable performance of the motion estimation [normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) <;0.15, correlation coefficient (CC) >;0.9] under the noncontact condition. From the analysis of the results, we found the necessity of the angular velocity input and estimation error feedback due to physical contact. Our results suggest that the estimation method can be useful for a natural human-machine cooperation control. View full abstract»

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  • Brain–Muscle–Computer Interface: Mobile-Phone Prototype Development and Testing

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 531 - 538
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (700 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We report prototype development and testing of a new mobile-phone-based brain-muscle-computer interface for severely paralyzed persons, based on previous results from our group showing that humans may actively create specified power levels in two separate frequency bands of a single surface electromyography (sEMG) signal. EMG activity on the surface of a single face muscle site (auricularis superior) is recorded with a standard electrode. This analog electrical signal is imported into an Android-based mobile phone and digitized via an internal A/D converter. The digital signal is split, and then simultaneously filtered with two band-pass filters to extract total power within two separate frequency bands. The user-modulated power in each frequency band serves as two separate control channels for machine control. After signal processing, the Android phone sends commands to external devices via a Bluetooth interface. Users are trained to use the device via visually based operant conditioning, with simple cursor-to-target activities on the phone screen. The mobile-phone prototype interface is formally evaluated on a single advanced Spinal Muscle Atrophy subject, who has successfully used the interface in his home in evaluation trials and for remote control of a television. Development of this new device will not only guide future interface design for community use, but will also serve as an information technology bridge for in situ data collection to quantify human sEMG manipulation abilities for a relevant population. View full abstract»

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  • Mobility Support for Health Monitoring at Home Using Wearable Sensors

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 539 - 549
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (969 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a simple but effective handoff protocol that enables continuous monitoring of ambulatory patients at home by means of resource-limited sensors. Our proposed system implements a 2-tier network: one created by wearable sensors used for vital signs collection, and another by a point-to-point link established between the body sensor network coordinator device and a fixed access point (AP). Upon experiencing poor signal reception in the latter network tier when the patient moves, the AP may instruct the sensor network coordinator to forward vital signs data through one of the wearable sensor nodes acting as a temporary relay if the sensor-AP link has a stronger signal. Our practical implementation of the proposed scheme reveals that this relayed data operation decreases packet loss rate down to 20% of the value otherwise obtained when solely using the point-to-point, coordinator-AP link. In particular, the wrist location yields the best results over alternative body sensor positions when patients walk at a 0.5 m/s. View full abstract»

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  • A Novel Key Management Solution for Reinforcing Compliance With HIPAA Privacy/Security Regulations

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 550 - 556
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (369 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Digitizing medical records facilitates the healthcare process. However, it can also cause serious security and privacy problems, which are the major concern in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). While various conventional encryption mechanisms can solve some aspects of these problems, they cannot address the illegal distribution of decrypted medical images, which violates the regulations defined in the HIPAA. To protect decrypted medical images from being illegally distributed by an authorized staff member, the model proposed in this paper provides a way to integrate several cryptographic mechanisms. In this model, the malicious staff member can be tracked by a watermarked clue. By combining several well-designed cryptographic mechanisms and developing a key management scheme to facilitate the interoperation among these mechanisms, the risk of illegal distribution can be reduced. View full abstract»

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  • Interoperability of Medical Device Information and the Clinical Applications: An HL7 RMIM based on the ISO/IEEE 11073 DIM

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 557 - 566
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (968 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Medical devices are essential to the practice of modern healthcare services. Their benefits will increase if clinical software applications can seamlessly acquire the medical device data. The need to represent medical device observations in a format that can be consumable by clinical applications has already been recognized by the industry. Yet, the solutions proposed involve bilateral mappings from the ISO/IEEE 11073 Domain Information Model (DIM) to specific message or document standards. Considering that there are many different types of clinical applications such as the electronic health record and the personal health record systems, the clinical workflows, and the clinical decision support systems each conforming to different standard interfaces, detailing a mapping mechanism for every one of them introduces significant work and, thus, limits the potential health benefits of medical devices. In this paper, to facilitate the interoperability of clinical applications and the medical device data, we use the ISO/IEEE 11073 DIM to derive an HL7 v3 Refined Message Information Model (RMIM) of the medical device domain from the HL7 v3 Reference Information Mode (RIM). This makes it possible to trace the medical device data back to a standard common denominator, that is, HL7 v3 RIM from which all the other medical domains under HL7 v3 are derived. Hence, once the medical device data are obtained in the RMIM format, it can easily be transformed into HL7-based standard interfaces through XML transformations because these interfaces all have their building blocks from the same RIM. To demonstrate this, we provide the mappings from the developed RMIM to some of the widely used HL7 v3-based standard interfaces. View full abstract»

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  • Developing a Wireless Implantable Body Sensor Network in MICS Band

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 567 - 576
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (581 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Through an integration of wireless communication and sensing technologies, the concept of a body sensor network (BSN) was initially proposed in the early decade with the aim to provide an essential technology for wearable, ambulatory, and pervasive health monitoring for elderly people and chronic patients. It has become a hot research area due to big opportunities as well as great challenges it presents. Though the idea of an implantable BSN was proposed in parallel with the on-body sensor network, the development in this area is relatively slow due to the complexity of human body, safety concerns, and some technological bottlenecks such as the design of ultralow-power implantable RF transceiver. This paper describes a new wireless implantable BSN that operates in medical implant communication service (MICS) frequency band. This system innovatively incorporates both sensing and actuation nodes to form a closed-control loop for physiological monitoring and drug delivery for critically ill patients. The sensing node, which is designed using system-on-chip technologies, takes advantage of the newly available ultralow-power Zarlink MICS transceiver for wireless data transmission. Finally, the specific absorption rate distribution of the proposed system was simulated to determine the in vivo electromagnetic field absorption and the power safety limits. View full abstract»

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  • A Wireless Implantable Sensor Network System for In Vivo Monitoring of Physiological Signals

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 577 - 584
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (725 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A wireless implantable sensor network system (WISNS) is designed for in vivo monitoring physiological signals of a population of animals. WISNS can simultaneously monitor more than 15 animals, communicating three kinds of analog information among sensor nodes. Analog signals are transmitted to relay node at 800-KHz carrier by AM. Relay nodes digitalize and package them into messages, and then forward to the Wireless sensor network by Nordic RF technology (NWSN). Smaller overall dimensions (<;2 cm3), lower power regulation, and dedicated packaging make the system suitable and compatible for implantable devices. The implantable sensor node, protocol stack of NWSN, and performance of the system are evaluated and optimized with ECG monitoring test of rats. Compared with those commercially available sensor nodes, our implantable one is leading in the weight and volume miniaturization, and our WISNS solution shows huge potential in achieving the compatibility of different animals. View full abstract»

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  • Mobile Social Network Services for Families With Children With Developmental Disabilities

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 585 - 593
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1199 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As Internet technologies evolve, their applications have changed various aspects of human life. Here, we attempt to examine their potential impact on services for families with developmentally delayed children. Our research is thus designed to utilize wireless mobile communication technologies, location services, and search technology in an effort to match families of specific needs with potential care providers. Based on the investigation conducted by our counselors, this paper describes a platform for smooth communication between professional communities and families with children with developmental disabilities (CDD). This research also looks into the impact of management of mobile social network services and training on the operation of these services. Interaction opportunities, care, and support to families with CDD are introduced. View full abstract»

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  • Automatic Detection of Temporal Gait Parameters in Poststroke Individuals

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 594 - 601
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (520 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Approximately one-third of people who recover from a stroke require some form of assistance to walk. Repetitive task-oriented rehabilitation interventions have been shown to improve motor control and function in people with stroke. Our long-term goal is to design and test an intensive task-oriented intervention that will utilize the two primary components of constrained-induced movement therapy: massed, task-oriented training and behavioral methods to increase use of the affected limb in the real world. The technological component of the intervention is based on a wearable footwear-based sensor system that monitors relative activity levels, functional utilization, and gait parameters of affected and unaffected lower extremities. The purpose of this study is to describe a methodology to automatically identify temporal gait parameters of poststroke individuals to be used in assessment of functional utilization of the affected lower extremity as a part of behavior enhancing feedback. An algorithm accounting for intersubject variability is capable of achieving estimation error in the range of 2.6-18.6% producing comparable results for healthy and poststroke subjects. The proposed methodology is based on inexpensive and user-friendly technology that will enable research and clinical applications for rehabilitation of people who have experienced a stroke. View full abstract»

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  • Monitoring and Evaluation of Blood Pressure Changes With a Home Healthcare System

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 602 - 607
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (810 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We investigated changes in blood pressure with exercise, including walking and ergometer training, sleep, and body weight. Blood pressure was monitored over a period of about 1 year in 61 subjects in Osaka, Japan. The morning systolic blood pressures were analyzed using multivariate regression analysis, and the correlations between systolic blood pressure and the above parameters were determined. The systolic blood pressure distribution was classified into improved, stable, and ingravescence groups. In the improved group, exercise intensity and total calories were important factors controlling the systolic blood pressure. More than 300 kcal per day was needed to improve the systolic blood pressure. In the stable and ingravescence groups, body weight control was also an important factor in maintaining blood pressure. An increase of 1 kg in body weight was associated with systolic blood pressure increases of 3 and 6 mmHg in the stable and ingravescence groups, respectively. The long-term repeated use of home blood pressure testing may be a good self-care strategy for monitoring daily health. View full abstract»

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  • Determining Level of Postural Control in Young Adults Using Force-Sensing Resistors

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 608 - 614
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (810 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A force-sensing platform (FSP), sensitive to changes of the postural control system was designed. The platform measured effects of postural perturbations in static and dynamic conditions. This paper describes the implementation of an FSP using force-sensing resistors as sensing elements. Real-time qualitative assessment utilized a rainbow color scale to identify areas with high force concentration. Postprocessing of the logged data provided end-users with quantitative measures of postural control. The objective of this research was to establish the feasibility of using an FSP to test and gauge human postural control. Tests were conducted in eye open and eye close states. Readings obtained were tested for repeatability using a one-way analysis of variance test. The platform gauged postural sway by measuring the area of distribution for the weighted center of applied pressure at the foot. A fuzzy clustering algorithm was applied to identify regions of the foot with repetitive pressure concentration. Potential application of the platform in a clinical setting includes monitoring rehabilitation progress of stability dysfunction. The platform functions as a qualitative tool for initial, on-the-spot assessment, and quantitative measure for postacquisition assessment on balance abilities. View full abstract»

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  • Synthesis of the 12-Lead Electrocardiogram From Differential Leads

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 615 - 621
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (848 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A new approach is proposed for synthesizing the standard 12-lead ECG from three differential leads formed by pairs of proximal electrodes on the body surface. The method is supported by a statistical analysis that gives the best personalized positions of electrodes. The measurements from multichannel ECGs were used to calculate the differential leads. Our algorithm searches for optimal differential leads and the corresponding personalized transformation matrix that is used to synthesize the standard 12-lead ECG. The algorithm has been evaluated on 99 multichannel ECGs measured on 30 healthy subjects and 35 patients scheduled for elective cardiac surgery. It is shown that the algorithm significantly outperforms the synthesis based on the EASI lead system with medians of correlation coefficients greater than 0.954 for all 12 standard leads. To determine the optimal number of differential leads, the syntheses for two, three, and four differential leads were calculated. The analysis shows that 3 is the optimal number of differential leads for practical applications. Because of the proximity of the differential electrodes, the proposed approach offers an opportunity for the synthesis of a standard 12-lead ECG with wireless electrodes. View full abstract»

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  • Generalizing Common Tasks in Automated Skin Lesion Diagnosis

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 622 - 629
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (950 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a general model using supervised learning and MAP estimation that is capable of performing many common tasks in automated skin lesion diagnosis. We apply our model to segment skin lesions, detect occluding hair, and identify the dermoscopic structure pigment network. Quantitative results are presented for segmentation and hair detection and are competitive when compared to other specialized methods. Additionally, we leverage the probabilistic nature of the model to produce receiver operating characteristic curves, show compelling visualizations of pigment networks, and provide confidence intervals on segmentations. View full abstract»

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  • Measuring and Reflecting Depth of Anesthesia Using Wavelet and Power Spectral Density

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 630 - 639
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1010 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper evaluates depth of anesthesia (DoA) monitoring using a new index. The proposed method preconditions raw EEG data using an adaptive threshold technique to remove spikes and low-frequency noise. We also propose an adaptive window length technique to adjust the length of the sliding window. The information pertinent to DoA is then extracted to develop a feature function using discrete wavelet transform and power spectral density. The evaluation demonstrates that the new index reflects the patient's transition from consciousness to unconsciousness with the induction of anesthesia in real time. View full abstract»

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  • A Learning-Based Similarity Fusion and Filtering Approach for Biomedical Image Retrieval Using SVM Classification and Relevance Feedback

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 640 - 646
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (523 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a classification-driven biomedical image retrieval framework based on image filtering and similarity fusion by employing supervised learning techniques. In this framework, the probabilistic outputs of a multiclass support vector machine (SVM) classifier as category prediction of query and database images are exploited at first to filter out irrelevant images, thereby reducing the search space for similarity matching. Images are classified at a global level according to their modalities based on different low-level, concept, and keypoint-based features. It is difficult to find a unique feature to compare images effectively for all types of queries. Hence, a query-specific adaptive linear combination of similarity matching approach is proposed by relying on the image classification and feedback information from users. Based on the prediction of a query image category, individual precomputed weights of different features are adjusted online. The prediction of the classifier may be inaccurate in some cases and a user might have a different semantic interpretation about retrieved images. Hence, the weights are finally determined by considering both precision and rank order information of each individual feature representation by considering top retrieved relevant images as judged by the users. As a result, the system can adapt itself to individual searches to produce query-specific results. Experiment is performed in a diverse collection of 5 000 biomedical images of different modalities, body parts, and orientations. It demonstrates the efficiency (about half computation time compared to search on entire collection) and effectiveness (about 10%-15% improvement in precision at each recall level) of the retrieval approach. View full abstract»

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  • Strengths and Weaknesses of 1.5T and 3T MRS Data in Brain Glioma Classification

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 647 - 654
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (578 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Although magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) methods of 1.5Tesla (T) and 3T have been widely applied during the last decade for noninvasive diagnostic purposes, only a few studies have been reported on the value of the information extracted in brain cancer discrimination. The purpose of this study is threefold. First, to show that the diagnostic value of the information extracted from two different MRS scanners of 1.5T and 3T is significantly influenced in terms of brain gliomas discrimination. Second, to statistically evaluate the discriminative potential of publicly known metabolic ratio markers, obtained from these two types of scanners in classifying low-, intermediate-, and high-grade gliomas. Finally, to examine the diagnostic value of new metabolic ratios in the discrimination of complex glioma cases where the diagnosis is both challenging and critical. Our analysis has shown that although the information extracted from 3T MRS scanner is expected to provide better brain gliomas discrimination; some factors like the features selected, the pulse-sequence parameters, and the spectroscopic data acquisition methods can influence the discrimination efficiency. Finally, it is shown that apart from the bibliographical known, new metabolic ratio features such as N-acetyl aspartate/S, Choline/S, Creatine/S , and myo-Inositol/S play significant role in gliomas grade discrimination. View full abstract»

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  • Geometric Calibration of a Micro-CT System and Performance for Insect Imaging

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 655 - 660
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (708 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Micro-CT with a high spatial resolution in combination with computer-based-reconstruction techniques is considered a powerful tool for morphological study of insects. The quality of CT images crucially depends on the precise knowledge of the scan geometry of the micro-CT system. In this paper, we have proposed a method to calculate the deviation of rotating axis for compensating deficiency of existing methods. A practical application of this geometric calibration method of the micro-CT system for insect imaging is presented. We have performed the computer-simulation study and experimental study with our prototype micro-CT system. The results demonstrate that the proposed technique is accurate and robust. In addition, we have evaluated the imaging characteristics of the detector in terms of modulation-transfer function (MTF). Finally, insect imaging performance and image reconstruction from data acquired with different energies are presented. View full abstract»

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  • A Computer-Based Technique for Automated Spot Detection in Proteomics Images

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 661 - 667
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (548 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper introduces a novel computer-based technique for automated detection of protein spots in proteomics images. The proposed technique is based on the localization of regional intensity maxima associated with protein spots and is formulated so as to ignore rectangular-shaped streaks, minimize the detection of false negatives, and allow the detection of multiple overlapping spots. Regional intensity constraints are imposed on the localized maxima in order to cope with the presence of noise and artifacts. The experimental evaluation of the proposed technique on real proteomics images demonstrates that it: 1) achieves a predictive value ( PV) and detection sensitivity (DS ) which exceed 90%; 2) outperforms Melanie software package in terms of PV , specificity, and DS; 3) ignores artifacts; 4) distinguishes multiple overlapping spots; 5) locates spots within streaks; and 6) is automated and efficient. View full abstract»

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  • Vascular System Modeling in Parallel Environment - Distributed and Shared Memory Approaches

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 668 - 672
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (511 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents two approaches in parallel modeling of vascular system development in internal organs. In the first approach, new parts of tissue are distributed among processors and each processor is responsible for perfusing its assigned parts of tissue to all vascular trees. Communication between processors is accomplished by passing messages, and therefore, this algorithm is perfectly suited for distributed memory architectures. The second approach is designed for shared memory machines. It parallelizes the perfusion process during which individual processing units perform calculations concerning different vascular trees. The experimental results, performed on a computing cluster and multicore machines, show that both algorithms provide a significant speedup. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine publishes basic and applied papers of information technology applications in health, healthcare and biomedicine.

 

This Transaction ceased publication in 2012. The current retitled publication is IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Yuan-ting Zhang
427, Ho Sin Hang Engineering Building, The Chinese
University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong
ytzhang@ee.cuhk.edu.hk
Phone:+852 2609-8458
Fax:+852 2609-5558