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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date June 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • This month's covers …

    Page(s): c2
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  • Table of content

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  • In this issue - technically

    Page(s): 2
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  • From the editor-in-chief

    Page(s): 3
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  • Developing Young Space System Engineers

    Page(s): 4 - 13
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    At a fundamental level, system engineering is the process by which engineering efforts are communicated, controlled, and organized on complex projects. The engineers who perform this work well are able to work across multiple engineering and managerial disciplines. They require outstanding technical, personal, management, and communications skills and an ability, based on experience, to work in areas where clean decisions are not possible. Furthermore, within the Space Department (SD) at the Johns Hopkins University - Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL), lead system engineers are delegated responsibility for leading the development of the technical baselines and ensuring their performance robustly meets requirements. Success in these areas requires a level of capability and maturity that can only be developed through time and experience. With such a high bar being set, the question: “How does one develop high-caliber system engineers?” becomes difficult to answer. Within the JHU/APL SD, prior to 2006, the primary means of attaining system engineers were through hiring experienced staff from external organizations or moving interested and capable staff from other areas of the department. This situation creates two problems within a growing organization. First, potential staff with the credentials stated above is extremely difficult to find, making it difficult for a system engineering organization to grow in the face of attrition. Second, the demographics of a system engineering organization become skewed toward older staff, limiting the organization's access to new methodologies, alternative means of collaboration, linkages to the university system and (frankly) youthful energy, to name a few. To address this need, management within the department developed a program for developing newly minted Masters Graduates. Key to this program is the recognition that system engineering is a process for communicating and organizing the work associated with the- - development and production of a specific product which is not an end to itself. As such, providing experience in both system engineering and the product-focused disciplines necessary for developing, integrating or operating space systems is critical. This describes the impetus for developing the Young Space Systems Engineers Program, key program features, problems encountered during development, and the program's successes. A strong case is made for the necessity for system engineers to understand the system engineering process and the product they produce, as well as the human element that goes into making it. View full abstract»

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  • The Smart Skies project

    Page(s): 14 - 23
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    The Smart Skies project is an ambitious and world-leading research endeavor exploring the development of key enabling technologies, which support the efficient utilization of airspace by manned and unmanned airspace users. This provides a programmatic description of the research and development of: an automated separation management system; a mobile aircraft tracking system; and aircraft-based sense-and-ad technologies. A summary of the results from a series of real-world flight testing campaigns is also presented. View full abstract»

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  • Introduction to EMI/EMC test requirements for space applications

    Page(s): 24 - 29
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    System and unit designers should be aware that unique tests and considerations are required for the space qualification of any electronic unit. These invariably include a group of tests that are called electromagnetic interference (EMI) and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) tests. The EMI/EMC qualification test phase is usually performed on an engineering model and for the first flight unit. An EMI/EMC qualification test phase is comprised of four major tests: · Conducted Emissions, · Conducted Susceptibility, · Radiated Emissions, and · Radiated Susceptibility. These tests, several other EMI/EMC-like tests, important applicable documents, exceptions to the guidelines in these applicable documents; testing problems and solutions are described. This is intended as an introduction for the designer/builder of an electronic unit so they may be able to plan for, and intelligently participate in a very important phase of their design's qualification. This will ensure that the entire system functions properly in its intended electromagnetic environment. View full abstract»

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  • Temporal characterization of small arms muzzle flash in the broadband visible

    Page(s): 30 - 37
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    Various systems are under consideration to track point-of-origin of incoming small arms fire. The tendency of these systems is to use either acoustic (report or projectile fly-by) or optical (muzzle flash or tracer tracking) methods to allow signal processing to determine point of origin. The authors have developed a simple system for characterizing the muzzle flash duration of common military small-arms ammunition as a feeder for system design considerations. This reports on the results of that characterization. View full abstract»

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  • Satellite battery technology — A tutorial and overview

    Page(s): 38 - 43
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    Herein we discuss the battery technologies currently qualified for space. It includes the advantages and disadvantages for each technology and provides some parameters that allow selection of the appropriate system for a given application. In addition, some of the newer technologies being developed for energy storage applications for the future are described. View full abstract»

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  • Future contributions to appear in the IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems [TAES]

    Page(s): 44
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  • Distinguished lecturers & Tutorials

    Page(s): 45
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  • IEEE aerospace & electronic systems society organization

    Page(s): 46
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  • Directory of IEEE-AESS personnel

    Page(s): 47
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  • Membership application

    Page(s): 48
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  • Meetings calendar

    Page(s): c3
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  • [Back cover]

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
SenTech, LLC - A DSCI Company
12601 Research Parkway
Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 207-1900 ext: 2102
(407) 450-0929 (BB)
tpace@sentech.dsci.com