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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 7 • Date July 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 31
  • IEEE Communications Magazine

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 2 - 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • "Global Comsoc" embracing the globe [The President's Page]

    Page(s): 6 - 10
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE ICC 2011 explores global advance of wireless system and networking communications in Kyoto, Japan

    Page(s): 12 - 14
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Conference calendar

    Page(s): 16
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • ComSoc 2011 election take time to vote

    Page(s): 17
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • New products

    Page(s): 18
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • 4G mobile licenses under auction in Spain [Global Communications News Letter]

    Page(s): 1 - 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Future internet architectures: design and deployment perspectives [Guest editorial]

    Page(s): 24 - 25
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  • A survey of the research on future internet architectures

    Page(s): 26 - 36
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (651 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The current Internet, which was designed over 40 years ago, is facing unprecedented challenges in many aspects, especially in the commercial context. The emerging demands for security, mobility, content distribution, etc. are hard to be met by incremental changes through ad-hoc patches. New clean-slate architecture designs based on new design principles are expected to address these challenges. In this survey article, we investigate the key research topics in the area of future Internet architecture. Many ongoing research projects from United States, the European Union, Japan, China, and other places are introduced and discussed. We aim to draw an overall picture of the current research progress on the future Internet architecture. View full abstract»

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  • Loci of competition for future internet architectures

    Page(s): 38 - 43
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (142 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Designing for competition is an important consideration for the design of future Internet architectures. Network architects should systematically consider the loci of competition in any proposed network architecture. To be economically sustainable, network architectures should encourage competition within each locus, anticipate and manage the interactions between the loci, and be adaptable to evolution in the loci. Given the longevity of network architectures relative to network technologies and applications, it is important to ensure that competition is not unnecessarily foreclosed at any particular locus of competition. View full abstract»

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  • Biological principles for future internet architecture design

    Page(s): 44 - 52
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (752 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Currently, a large number of activities on Internet redesign are being discussed in the research community. While today's Internet was initially planned as a datagram-oriented communication network among research facilities, it has grown and evolved to accommodate unexpected diversity in services and applications. For the future Internet this trend is anticipated to continue even more. Such developments demand that the architecture of the new-generation Internet be designed in a dynamic, modular, and adaptive way. Features like these can often be observed in biological processes that serve as inspiration for designing new cooperative architectural concepts. Our contribution in this article is twofold. First, unlike previous discussions on biologically inspired network control mechanisms, we do not limit ourselves to a single method, but consider ecosystems and coexisting environments of entities that can cooperate based on biological principles. Second, we illustrate our grand view by not only taking inspiration from biology in the design process, but also sketching a possible way to implement biologically driven control in a future Internet architecture. View full abstract»

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  • Enabling future internet research: the FEDERICA case

    Page(s): 54 - 61
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    The Internet, undoubtedly, is the most influential technical invention of the 20th century that affects and constantly changes all aspects of our day-to-day lives nowadays. Although it is hard to predict its long-term consequences, the potential future of the Internet definitely relies on future Internet research. Prior to every development and deployment project, an extensive and comprehensive research study must be performed in order to design, model, analyze, and evaluate all impacts of the new initiative on the existing environment. Taking the ever-growing size of the Internet and the increasing complexity of novel Internet-based applications and services into account, the evaluation and validation of new ideas cannot be effectively carried out over local test beds and small experimental networks. The gap which exists between the small-scale pilots in academic and research test beds and the realsize validations and actual deployments in production networks can be bridged by using virtual infrastructures. FEDERICA is one of the facilities, based on virtualization capabilities in both network and computing resources, which creates custom-made virtual environments and makes them available for Future Internet Researchers. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art research projects that have been using the virtual infrastructure slices of FEDERICA in order to validate their research concepts, even when they are disruptive to the test bed's infrastructure, to obtain results in realistic network environments. View full abstract»

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  • Content, connectivity, and cloud: ingredients for the network of the future

    Page(s): 62 - 70
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (908 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A new network architecture for the Internet needs ingredients from three approaches: information- centric networking, cloud computing integrated with networking, and open connectivity. Information-centric networking considers pieces of information as first-class entities of a networking architecture, rather than only indirectly identifying and manipulating them via a node hosting that information; this way, information becomes independent from the devices they are stored in, enabling efficient and application- independent information caching in the network. Cloud networking offers a combination and integration of cloud computing and virtual networking. It is a solution that distributes the benefits of cloud computing more deeply into the network, and provides a tighter integration of virtualization features at computing and networking levels. To support these concepts, open connectivity services need to provide advanced transport and networking mechanisms, making use of network and path diversity (even leveraging direct optical paths) and encoding techniques, and dealing with ubiquitous mobility of user, content and information objects in a unified way. View full abstract»

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  • PEARL: a programmable virtual router platform

    Page(s): 71 - 77
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    Programmable routers supporting virtualization are a key building block for bridging the gap between new Internet protocols and their deployment in real operational networks. This article presents the design and implementation of PEARL, a programmable virtual router platform with relatively high performance. It offers high flexibility by allowing users to control the configuration of both hardware and software data paths. The platform makes use of fast lookup in hardware and software exceptions in commodity multicore CPUs to achieve highspeed packet processing. Multiple isolated packet streams and virtualization techniques ensure isolation among virtual router instances. View full abstract»

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  • Topics in network and service management [Series editorial]

    Page(s): 78 - 79
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  • Toward decentralized probabilistic management

    Page(s): 80 - 86
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (148 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In recent years, data communication networks have grown to immense size and have been diversified by the mobile revolution. Existing management solutions are based on a centralized deterministic paradigm, which is appropriate for networks of moderate size operating in relatively stable conditions. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that these management solutions are not able to cope with the large dynamic networks that are emerging. In this article, we argue that the adoption of a decentralized and probabilistic paradigm for network management will be crucial to meet the challenges of future networks, such as efficient resource usage, scalability, robustness, and adaptability. We discuss the potential of decentralized probabilistic management and its impact on management operations, and illustrate the paradigm by three example solutions for real-time monitoring and anomaly detection. View full abstract»

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  • Network resilience: a systematic approach

    Page(s): 88 - 97
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    The cost of failures within communication networks is significant and will only increase as their reach further extends into the way our society functions. Some aspects of network resilience, such as the application of fault-tolerant systems techniques to optical switching, have been studied and applied to great effect. However, networks - and the Internet in particular - are still vulnerable to malicious attacks, human mistakes such as misconfigurations, and a range of environmental challenges. We argue that this is, in part, due to a lack of a holistic view of the resilience problem, leading to inappropriate and difficult-to-manage solutions. In this article, we present a systematic approach to building resilient networked systems. We first study fundamental elements at the framework level such as metrics, policies, and information sensing mechanisms. Their understanding drives the design of a distributed multilevel architecture that lets the network defend itself against, detect, and dynamically respond to challenges. We then use a concrete case study to show how the framework and mechanisms we have developed can be applied to enhance resilience. View full abstract»

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  • A survey of virtual LAN usage in campus networks

    Page(s): 98 - 103
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    VLANs are widely used in today's enterprise networks to improve Ethernet scalability and support network policies. However, manuals and textbooks offer very little information about how VLANs are actually used in practice. Through discussions with network administrators and analysis of configuration data, we describe how three university campuses and one academic department use VLANs to achieve a variety of goals. We argue that VLANs are ill-suited to some of these goals (e.g., VLANs are often used to realize access control policies, but constrain the types of policies that can be expressed). Furthermore, the use of VLANs leads to significant complexity in the configuration of network devices. View full abstract»

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  • Toward fine-grained traffic classification

    Page(s): 104 - 111
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    A decade of research on traffic classification has provided various methodologies to investigate the traffic composition in data communication networks. Many variants or combinations of such methodologies have been introduced continuously to improve the classification accuracy and efficiency. However, the level of classification details is often bounded to identifying protocols or applications in use. In this article, we propose a fine-grained traffic classification scheme based on the analysis of existing classification methodologies. This scheme allows to classify traffic according to the functionalities in an application. In particular, we present a traffic classifier which utilizes a document retrieval technique and applies multiple signatures to detect the peer-to-peer application traffic according to different functionalities in it. We show that the proposed scheme can provide more in-depth classification results for analyzing user contexts. View full abstract»

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  • Some recent IEEE standards for wireless data communications [Series editorial]

    Page(s): 112 - 113
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  • IEEE 802.15.3c: the first IEEE wireless standard for data rates over 1 Gb/s

    Page(s): 114 - 121
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    This article explains the important features of IEEE 802.15.3c, the first wireless standard from IEEE in the 60-GHz (millimeter wave) band and its development. The standard provides three PHY modes for specific market segments, with mandatory data rates exceeding 1 Gb/s. During the span of the standard development, new contributions to wireless communication technology were also made, including a new channel model, a codebook-based beamforming scheme, and a low-latency aggregation method. View full abstract»

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  • Overview of femtocell support in advanced WiMAX systems

    Page(s): 122 - 130
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    The femtocell concept is an integral part of the telecommunication industry's efforts to provide high-throughput, high quality services into the users' home. In contrast to conventional cell types which are well-planned by the operators, femtocell base stations are supposed to be installed by customers themselves, similar to a WiFi access point. Unlike WiFi, however, femtocells operate mainly in licensed bands, such that operators are in control of the radio interface. This brings new challenges as well as opportunities for femtocell design; these include sophisticated mobility and interference management, increased reliability, as well as deployment in a plug-and-play manner. Extensive progress in femtocell design has been made in Advanced WiMAX recently, which is associated with the IEEE 802.16m update in 2011. This article gives an overview and update on novel concepts and mechanisms for femtocell support in the network architecture and air interface that have been adopted into the WiMAX Forum network specifications and the IEEE 802.16m specification. View full abstract»

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  • Smart utility networks in tv white space

    Page(s): 132 - 139
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    This article presents an overview of the background, technology, regulation, and standardization in the course of deploying smart utility networks (SUNs) in TV white space (TVWS) communications, two wireless technologies currently receiving overwhelming interest in the wireless industry and academia. They are independent to and uncorrelated with each other, but share the same mission: conserving resources and increasing efficiency. This article reviews the systems as separate technologies, and then combines them to propose a hybrid solution that draws out their respective advantages. The first part focuses on SUNs and describes the SUN usage model with typical application requirements and practical examples, followed by the latest developments in standardization initiatives with emphasis on the currently active IEEE 802.15.4g and 802.11ah groups. The second part discusses TVWS, studying and summarizing the regulations governing its usage, and then reports on the standardization bodies' responses to these regulations with a focus on IEEE 802.11af, 802.19.1, and 802.22. Finally, the third part amalgamates the SUN usage model with TVWS regulations and deployment scenarios, providing relationship mapping between the SUN components and regulation-compliant TVWS devices. Further discussions concentrate on the opportunities and challenges along the path of realizing a practical SUN in the TVWS spectrum under the current technical and regulatory conditions. Several recommendations are made from both regulatory and technical standpoints to further increase utilization of SUNs in TVWS. View full abstract»

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  • Advances in mode-stirred reverberation chambers for wireless communication performance evaluation

    Page(s): 140 - 147
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    Reverberation chambers (RC) are a popular tool for laboratory wireless communication performance evaluation, and their standardization for Over-The-Air (OTA) measurements is underway. Yet, the inherent limitations of single-cavity RCs to emulate isotropic Rayleigh-fading scenarios with uniform phase distribution and high elevation angular spread put their representation of realistic scenarios into jeopardy. Recent advances in the last few years, however, have solved all these limitations by using more general mode-stirred reverberation chambers (MSC), wherein the number of cavities, their stirring and coupling mechanisms, and their software postprocessing algorithms is far from simple, representing a new era for wireless communications research, development, and over-the-air testing. This article highlights recent advances in the development of second-generation mode-stirred chambers for wireless communications performance evaluation. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Sean Moore
Centripetal Networks