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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 5 • Date May 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • This month's covers …

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): c2
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  • Table of content

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1
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  • In this issue - technically

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 2
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  • From the editor-in-chief

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 3
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  • Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System design, integration, & flight test

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 4 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4674 KB)  

    Currently, the majority of collision avoidance systems on fighter aircraft depend on the pilot taking action whenever a warning is issued by the manual system. Any future substantial reductions in mishap rates will require extending the collision avoidance technology to systems that not only warn the pilot but also take control and fly the aircraft out of danger before returning control to the pilot. An Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto GCAS) will provide this extension of collision avoidance technology. Much work has been accomplished over the past 20 years in the developing and testing of an Auto GCAS. In the past three years, a Fighter Risk Reduction Program (FRRP) has been undertaken by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Wright Patterson Air Froce Base. This program is a joint effort between AFRL, NASA Dryden, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics, and the Air Force Flight Test Center. The FRRP has advanced Auto GCAS technology to a level now capable of production transition. Results of this effort will be discussed herein. The F-16 test aircraft is shown in Figure 1. Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT) is defined as collision with terrain, water, trees, or a man-made obstacle during flight prior to planned touchdown. CFIT includes mishaps where the aircraft is controllable and the pilot is actively controlling the aircraft or the pilot's ability to control the aircraft is reduced due to spatial disorientation. CFIT also includes mishaps where the aircraft is flown in controlled flight to a point where it is no longer possible to avoid unintended ground impact (attempted maneuver with insufficient altitude or airspeed, low altitude over bank, or flight into a box canyon), regardless of subsequent pilot reaction (add power, maneuver to avoid terrain, etc.). Prevention of CFIT mishaps utilizing Auto GCAS will be presented. The requirements for Auto GCAS and the order of importance of those requirements are discussed herein. This will show why pre- - vention of a nuisance warning has a higher priority than the aircraft recovery and how an automatic system can be designed to basically eliminate nuisances. Discussions will include techniques to develop nuisance criteria by utilizing a Pilot Activated Recovery System (PARS). Discussions will include how the PARS are used to improve flight safety. In 2005, a goal of reducing CFIT mishaps by 75% was established. To accomplish this goal, the Undersecretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness established a Defense Safety Oversight Council (DSOC). The DSOC further chartered nine Task Force teams targeting multiple areas where mishap reduction could occur. One task force, the Aviation Safety Improvement Task Force (ASITF) was chartered with reducing aviation mishaps. The ASI TF formed integrated product teams and working groups to assess aviation mishaps and recommend feasible and effective mitigation strategies. The Safety Technology Working Group (STWG) was the ASI TF working group charged with identifying technological mitigation strategies for aviation mishap reduction. The STWG recommended Auto GCAS as the means to achieve the goal of reducing CFIT mishaps. View full abstract»

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  • SMRF architecture concepts

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 12 - 17
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    This presents three valuable applications of scalable multifunction RF (SMRF) systems. These systems allow radar, ESM, and communication functionality using a single front-end architecture. With the use of a novel system design tool, concepts for SMRF architectures for airborne, ground-based and naval applications have been obtained based on a C-RAM scenario. View full abstract»

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  • Urban environment solutions to GPS signal near-far effect

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 18 - 27
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3721 KB)  

    Our aim at improving GPS receivers' availability in an urban environment, weak GPS signal acquisition becomes one key issue in satellite navigation signal processing. In special signal propagation environments, such as indoors, urban crayons, and woods, various factors such as signal propagation power loss, amplitude attenuation, and phase, time, and frequency delay distortions produce at the signal receiving end, what is now known in the literature as, the GPS signal near-far effect, which results in severe degradation of the GPS signal acquisition performance. To mitigate the near-far effect, we focus on four main factors, which are the signal strength attenuation; the Doppler frequency distortion; carrier phase uncertainty; and multi-path distribution because a proper optimization of these factors appears to improve the acquisition performance effectively. View full abstract»

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  • Method for building recognition from FLIR images

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 28 - 33
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3526 KB)  

    Herein, a method for building recognition is presented in forward looking infrared (FLIR) images with clutter background, which is composed of the several sub-procedures. In the first phase, a three-dimensional (3-D) target model is generated and the model features are predicted based on the sensor's perspective relative to the 3-D target model. The second phase of the process, multi-scale structuring elements are generated pertaining to the 3-D target model and flight trajectory. Structuring elements for infrared image is selected by a look-up-table approach based on the parameters of sensor's view, and the use of morphology-based filters can respond to the size and shape of target to suppress the clutter background. In the following process, iterative segmentation for the result image of background suppression is used to obtain regions of interest (ROIs), and features extraction of ROIs and matching retain the ROIs that are closest to predicted features. Lastly, the target is identified by fusing the line features and multi-frame integration. Experiment results show the proposed algorithm can precisely recognize the target from FLIR images with a complicated background. View full abstract»

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  • Net centric radar technology & development using an open system architecture approach

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 34 - 37
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    The second generation of the Radar Open Systems Architecture has been developed and put into practice. This approach consists of a layered architecture that isolates applications from underlying hardware and software elements such as operating systems, middlewares, communication fabrics, and computer platforms. The framework also consists of a set of component libraries that are being populated as the framework is applied in an expanding series of application domains. Easy swapability for the library components or newly developed components along with a high degree of hardware independence allows systems built using this infrastructure to be easily maintained and upgraded. View full abstract»

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  • Successful experiment in leveraging research investment

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 38 - 42
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    The ARL Federated Laboratory for Advanced and Interactive Displays begun in 1996 has proven to be a highly successful experiment in leveraging research investment for the Army, industry, and academia. The research is exploring human computer interfaces to dramatically improve the interface between Army users and their information systems for the Army After Next. Leveraging of university research grants, industrial internal R&D funds, and other governmental agency funding has substantially amplified all consortia members investments. View full abstract»

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  • Nominations are now being accepted for the prestigious IEEE AESS pioneer award

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 43
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  • Distinguished lecturers & tutorials

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 44
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  • AESS tutorials [Society Information]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 45
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  • IEEE aerospace & electronic systems society organization

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 46
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  • Directory of IEEE-AESS personnel

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 47
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  • Membership application

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 48
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  • Meetings calendar

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): c3
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  • [Back cover]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
SenTech, LLC - A DSCI Company
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