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Pervasive Computing, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date April-June 2011

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  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): c1
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  • Features [contents]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): c2
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  • Departments

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1
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  • What Will You Sacrifice?

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 2 - 3
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  • Perspectives on Pervasive Health from Some of the Field's Leading Researchers

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 4 - 7
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (837 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    For the first installment of the "Pervasive Health" column, the authors asked several of the top researchers in the field to define the pervasive health field and describe active projects. Topics in this growing area include wireless and fixed sensors, sensor fusion and social networks, clinical workflow, and human aspects of health. View full abstract»

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  • Phones and MP3 Players as the Core Component in Future Appliances

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 8 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1662 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In the 1980s, we used power toolsets that consisted of five or six power tools but were delivered with a single motor attachable to each of the tools. The tools themselves were motorless. At the time, the rationale for this design was twofold: the motor was an expensive component and not replicating it saved money, and people did not need both their circular saw and their power drill at the same time. This approach has a long tradition and was also common, for example, with early electric kitchen appliances. Such systems have become uncommon. However, looking at current consumer electronics it seems that a similar trend might be emerging. This time the expensive and complex components are the user interface and the embedded processor. Hence, this component is shared among appliances.The variety of available devices, especially for the Android platform, is massive. Hence, many designs will likely include a mobile device whose size, processing power, and user interface capabilities can realize the requirements of the "computer." There are essentially two approaches to using mobile phones and MP3 players as computing components: in one, devices are sold as accessories to the phone; in the other, the phone becomes a part of the device. Examples for the first one can already be found in the market; for the second one, we have not seen examples yet. View full abstract»

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  • LittleRock: Enabling Energy-Efficient Continuous Sensing on Mobile Phones

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 12 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1066 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Today's mobile phones come with a rich set of built-in sensors such as accelerometers, ambient light sensors, compasses, and pressure sensors, which can measure various phenomena on and around the phone. Gathering user context such as user activity, geographic location, and location type requires continuous sampling of sensor data. However, such sampling shortens a phone's battery life because of the associated energy overhead. This article examines the root causes of this energy overhead and shows that energy-efficient continuous sensing can be achieved through proper system design. View full abstract»

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  • Guest editors' introduction: Pervasive Retail

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 16 - 18
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  • Toward a Platform for Pervasive Display Applications in Retail Environments

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 19 - 27
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2124 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The article discusses two prototypes - an interactive display wall and a targeted advertisement scenario - demonstrates the use of a context-aware middleware and provide insights into important requirements for display platforms for retail environments. View full abstract»

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  • Mobile Phones and Outdoor Advertising: Measurable Advertising

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 28 - 36
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
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    A system for measuring audiences of outdoor advertising in specific areas is based on the combination of mobile phone location estimations with Internet listings of social events. View full abstract»

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  • Using Mobile Phones to Monitor Shopping Time at Physical Stores

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 37 - 43
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1722 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article discusses the usage of mobile phones to monitor shopping time at physical stores. A phone-based shopping tracker transforms the problem of monitoring shopping time into a classification problem. It uses motif groups to identify movement trajectories based on spatial and temporal features embedded in each motif. View full abstract»

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  • Enhancing the Shopping Experience

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 44 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1459 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Editor's IntroThe first three of these projects relate to the pervasive retail theme, proposing applications that help users find deals, shop more efficiently, and organize food shopping cooperatives, such as in community-supported agriculture. Also described are a middleware solution for automating building and maintaining tourism systems and a proximity-based "smart spaces" platform.—Anthony D. Joseph View full abstract»

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  • What's in the Eyes for Context-Awareness?

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 48 - 57
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
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    Eye movements are a rich source of information about a person's context. Analyzing the link between eye movements and cognition might even allow us to develop cognition-aware pervasive computing systems that assess a person's cognitive context. View full abstract»

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  • LifeMap: A Smartphone-Based Context Provider for Location-Based Services

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 58 - 67
    Cited by:  Papers (44)
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    LifeMap, a smartphone-based context provider operating in real time, fuses accelerometer, digital compass, Wi-Fi, and GPS to track and automatically identify points of interest with room-level accuracy. View full abstract»

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  • The Escort System: A Safety Monitor for People Living with Alzheimer's Disease

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 68 - 77
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
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    The Escort system monitors residents of assisted living communities and alerts caregivers when they walk aimlessly, or "wander," into potentially dangerous situations. The system could help lead to improved care at reduced cost. View full abstract»

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  • The Open Wearable Computing Group

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 78 - 81
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (556 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Between 2004 and 2009, the European Commission and 42 partners from 16 countries invested about 24 million Euros to empower mobile workers through the wearIT@work project. In addition to maintenance, production, healthcare, and emergency response, new application domains targeted included cultural heritage, a rural living lab for the prevention of environmental disasters, and wearable computing assistance for visually impaired persons. Industrial demonstrators, evaluations results, and an exploitation strategy were developed and published in a technology repository that indicates the maturity levels of the different components. View full abstract»

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  • Smartphone Computing in the Classroom

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 82 - 86
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (741 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Smartphone computing platforms are increasingly used for instruction because such devices are becoming as common as traditional desktop computers and they can excite students about computing and networking. This column describes a network application design course at Virginia Tech that uses smartphones as computing platforms. It seeks to provide in-depth descriptions of important and innovative work in education and training in pervasive computing. I welcome your suggestions and comments for future columns. View full abstract»

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  • Smart Clothes—The Unfulfilled Pledge?

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 87 - 89
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The article discusses e-textiles technology, the concept of merging information and communications technology (ICT) with textiles and clothes initiated by smart textile companies. View full abstract»

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  • Toward a Digital Ecosystem: International Symposium on Ubiquitous Virtual Reality 2010

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 90 - 93
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    The International Symposium on Ubiquitous Virtual Reality (ISUVR) series continues to provide an interdisciplinary forum for leading researchers and graduate students, especially in the areas of ubiquitous computing, virtual reality, and augmented reality. The 2010 symposium's theme, "Toward a Digital Ecosystem," emphasized the roles of end users in actively creating and maintaining content in a managed systematic way, referred to as the digital ecosystem. View full abstract»

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  • Experimental Methodology in Pervasive Computing

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 94 - 96
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (810 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Pervasive computing sits at the interface of computer science, social sciences, psychology, and engineering. As a consequence, consistent standards and guidelines for empirical evaluation are elusive. Thus, in most key conferences and journals in the field (including IEEE Pervasive Computing), "lack of adequate evaluation" is the most common reason for rejecting a submission. At the same time, the evaluation's quality is often the subject of heated discussion among reviewers and program committee members. IEEE Pervasive Computing's "Experimental Methodology" department will look at specific problems, practices, and recommendations related to empirical research in pervasive computing. The department is motivated by the increasing awareness that the field needs to mature, moving from visions of what could be done toward real-world systems that quantitatively prove what can be done in a reproducible, objective way. View full abstract»

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  • Back Cover [advertisement]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): c3
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  • [Advertisement - Back cover]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

All aspects of current mobile computing research and applications development, including architectures, support services, algorithms and protocols, mobile environments, mobile communication systems, applications, emerging technologies, and societal impacts.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Dr. Roy Want
Intel Research