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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date March 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 32
  • IEEE Communications Magazine - Front cover

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 2 - 4
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  • ICT services - "Communications Society On-Line" [President's page]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 6 - 10
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  • The need for recertification [Certification Corner]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 12
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  • IEEE CCNC highlights latest advances in anytime, anywhere consumer communications [Conference Report]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 14 - 15
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  • IEEE GLOBECOM 2010 completes most successful meeting in 53-year history [Conference Report]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 16 - 18
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  • 2011 IEEE Online Conference on Green Communications September 26 - 29, 2011 [Conference Preview]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 20
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  • Product spotlights

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 23
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  • New products

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 24
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  • Global Communications Newsletter

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 4
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  • Radio communications: Components, systems, and networks

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 30
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  • Understanding conditions that lead to emulation attacks in dynamic spectrum access

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 32 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (170 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Dynamic spectrum access has proposed tiering radios into two groups: primary users and secondary users. PUs are assumed to have reserved spectrum available to them, while SUs (operating in overlay mode) must share whatever spectrum is available. The threat of emulation attacks, in which users pretend to be of a type they are not (either PU or SU) in order to gain unauthorized access to spectrum, has the potential to severely degrade the expected performance of the system. We analyze this problem within a Bayesian game framework, in which users are unsure of the legitimacy of the claimed type of other users. We show that depending on radios' beliefs about the fraction of PUs in the system, a policy maker can control the occurrence of emulation attacks by adjusting the gains and costs associated with performing or checking for emulation attacks. View full abstract»

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  • Dynamic spectrum access operational parameters with wireless microphones

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 38 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1039 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article provides a comprehensive analysis of dynamic spectrum access operational parameters in a typical hidden node scenario with protected wireless microphones in the TV white space. We consider all relevant effects and use an analysis framework that properly combines probabilistic technical factors to provide specific policy recommendations including the exclusion zone distances and the sensing-based DSA threshold detection levels. First, man-made noise measurements were taken in different locations and the amount of interference from man-made noise in potential wireless microphone channels was analyzed. Data collection results show that man-made noise levels can be up to 30 dB above the thermal noise floor. Furthermore, indoor-to-outdoor path loss measurements were conducted to determine the required exclusion distance for DSA-enabled TV band devices to ensure reliable wireless microphone operation in a typical application. The results show that the required exclusion zone can be safely and conservatively set at around 130 m when the results from man-made noise measurements and wireless microphone propagation measurements are used. Additionally, we developed a simulation to determine the required DSA sensing threshold levels for impairment-free wireless microphone operation. An indoor-to-outdoor path loss model was created based on the above path loss measurement results. This statistical path loss model was used to determine the received signal level at TV band devices and the interference level at the wireless microphone receiver. Our results show that the sensing threshold can be set at around -110 dBm (in a 110 kHz channel) for impairment- free wireless microphone operation when man-made noise and representative propagation models are used. View full abstract»

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  • The viability of spectrum trading markets

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 46 - 52
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (279 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Spectrum trading markets are of growing interest to many spectrum management agencies. They are motivated by their desire to increase the use of market-based mechanisms for spectrum management and reduce their emphasis on command and control methods. Despite the liberalization of regulations on spectrum trading in some countries, spectrum markets have not yet emerged as a key spectrum assignment component. The lack of liquidity in these markets is sometimes cited as a primary factor in this outcome. This work focuses on determining the conditions for viability of spectrum trading markets. We make use of agent-based computational economics to analyze different market scenario and the behaviors of its participants. Our results provide guidelines regarding the number of market participants and the amount of tradable spectrum that should be present in a spectrum trading market for it to be viable. We use the results of this analysis to make recommendations for the design of these markets. View full abstract»

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  • Unified space-time metrics to evaluate spectrum sensing

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 54 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1467 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Frequency-agile radio systems need to decide which frequencies are safe to use. In the context of recycling spectrum that may already be in use by primary users, both the spatial dimension to the spectrum sensing problem and the role of wireless fading are critical. It turns out that the traditional hypothesis testing framework for evaluating sensing misses both of these and thereby gives misleading intuitions. A unified framework is presented here in which the natural ROC curve correctly captures the two features desired from a spectrum sensing system: safety to primary users and performance for the secondary users. It is the trade-off between these two that is fundamental. The spectrum holes being sensed also span both time and space. The single-radio energy detector is used to illustrate the tension between the performance in time and the performance in space for a fixed value of protection to the primary user. View full abstract»

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  • Advances in standards and testbeds for cognitive radio networks: Part II

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 62 - 63
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  • Wireless service provision in TV white space with cognitive radio technology: A telecom operator's perspective and experience

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 64 - 73
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3458 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Currently there is a very fundamental change happening in spectrum regulation, possibly the most fundamental ever in its history. This is the enabling of spectrum sharing, where primary (licensed) users of the spectrum, are forced to allow sharing with secondary users, who use license-exempt equipment. Such sharing is free for the secondary users, subject to the condition that they do not cause harmful interference to the primary users. The first instance of such sharing is occurring with the UHF digital TV spectrum, in what is commonly called TV white space. Regulators such as the FCC in the United States and Ofcom in the United Kingdom have indicated that other spectrum will follow suit. Cognitive radio is an enabling technology that allows such sharing. Following recent rulings by FCC and Ofcom and the emergence of a series of related industry standards, CR operation in TVWS is moving from the research domain towards implementation and commercialization, with use-cases that are of interest to telecom operators. In this article we describe three such use cases: future home networks, coverage of the street from inside buildings, and broadband access to rural and underserved premises. We present results of modeling and trials of technical feasibility, undertaken by the Innovate and Design team at BT. Based on our experience we draw conclusions regarding the feasibility and commercial importance of these use cases, and identify some of the remaining technical and commercial challenges. View full abstract»

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  • Emerging cognitive radio applications: A survey

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 74 - 81
    Cited by:  Papers (50)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (914 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Recent developments in spectrum policy and regulatory domains, notably the release of the National Broadband Plan, the publication of final rules for TV white spaces, and the ongoing proceeding for secondary use of the 2360-2400 MHz band for medical body area networks, will allow more flexible and efficient use of spectrum in the future. These important changes open up exciting opportunities for cognitive radio to enable and support a variety of emerging applications, ranging from smart grid, public safety and broadband cellular, to medical applications. This article presents a high-level view on how cognitive radio (primarily from a dynamic spectrum access perspective) would support such applications, the benefits that cognitive radio would bring, and also some challenges that are yet to be resolved. We also illustrate related standardization that uses cognitive radio technologies to support such emerging applications. View full abstract»

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  • International standardization of cognitive radio systems

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 82 - 89
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1097 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The current radio environment is characterized by its heterogeneity. Different aspects of this heterogeneity include multiple operators and services, various radio access technologies, different network topologies, a broad range of radio equipment, and multiple frequency bands. Such an environment has a lot of technical and business opportunities. Examples are joint management of several radio access networks within one operator to balance load of these networks, detecting and using unused spectrum in the allocated frequency bands without interrupting the operation of the primary users of such frequency bands, and spectrum trading between several operators. To exploit such opportunities, the concept of cognitive radio system has been developed. Many CRS usage scenarios and business cases are possible. This has triggered a lot of standardization activity at all levels, including in the International Telecommunication Union, IEEE, European Telecommunications Standards Institute, and European Association for Standardizing Information and Communication Systems; each of these organizations is considering multiple CRS deployment scenarios and business directions. This article describes the current concept of the CRS and shows the big picture of international standardization of the CRS. Understanding of these standardization activities is very important for both academia and industry in order to select important research topics and promising business directions. View full abstract»

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  • Cognitive radio: Ten years of experimentation and development

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 90 - 100
    Cited by:  Papers (29)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1032 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The year 2009 marked the 10th anniversary of Mitola and Maguire Jr. introducing the concept of cognitive radio. This prompted an outpouring of research work related to CR, including the publication of more than 30 special issue scientific journals and more than 60 dedicated conferences and workshops. Although the theoretical research is blooming, with many interesting results presented, hardware and system development for CR is progressing at a slower pace. We provide synopses of the commonly used platforms and testbeds, examine what has been achieved in the last decade of experimentation and trials relating to CR, and draw several perhaps surprising conclusions. This analysis will enable the research community to focus on the key technologies to enable CR in the future. View full abstract»

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  • SpiderRadio: A cognitive radio network with commodity hardware and open source software

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 101 - 109
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (249 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this article we present SpiderRadio, a cognitive radio prototype for dynamic spectrum access networking. SpiderRadio is built using commodity IEEE 802.11a/b/g hardware and the open source MadWiFi driver. This helps us in developing and testing our prototype without having to buy and manage several licensed spectrum bands. We begin with a discussion of the key research issues and challenges in the practical implementation of a dynamic spectrum access network. Then the lessons learned from the development of dynamic spectrum access protocols, designing management frame structures, software implementation of the dynamic spectrum access network protocol stack, and testbed experimental measurement results are presented. Several trade-offs in prototype implementation complexity vs. network performance are also discussed. We also identify potential security vulnerabilities in cognitive radio networks, specifically as applied to SpiderRadio, and point out some defense mechanisms against these vulnerabilities. View full abstract»

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  • Future media Internet

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 110 - 111
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
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  • Curling: Content-ubiquitous resolution and delivery infrastructure for next-generation services

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 112 - 120
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (255 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    CURLING, a Content-Ubiquitous Resolution and Delivery Infrastructure for Next Generation Services, aims to enable a future content-centric Internet that will overcome the current intrinsic constraints by efficiently diffusing media content of massive scale. It entails a holistic approach, supporting content manipulation capabilities that encompass the entire content life cycle, from content publication to content resolution and, finally, to content delivery. CURLING provides to both content providers and customers high flexibility in expressing their location preferences when publishing and requesting content, respectively, thanks to the proposed scoping and filtering functions. Content manipulation operations can be driven by a variety of factors, including business relationships between ISPs, local ISP policies, and specific content provider and customer preferences. Content resolution is also natively coupled with optimized content routing techniques that enable efficient unicast and multicast- based content delivery across the global Internet. View full abstract»

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  • A Survey on content-oriented networking for efficient content delivery

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 121 - 127
    Cited by:  Papers (31)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (791 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As multimedia contents become increasingly dominant and voluminous, the current Internet architecture will reveal its inefficiency in delivering time-sensitive multimedia traffic. To address this issue, there have been studies on contentoriented networking (CON) by decoupling contents from hosts at the networking level. In this article, we present a comprehensive survey on content naming and name-based routing, and discuss further research issues in CON. We also quantitatively compare CON routing proposals, and evaluate the impact of the publish/subscribe paradigm and in-network caching. View full abstract»

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  • Peer-to-peer streaming of scalable video in future Internet applications

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 128 - 135
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1166 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Scalable video delivery over peer-to-peer networks appears to be key for efficient streaming in emerging and future Internet applications. Contrasting the conventional server-client approach, here, video is delivered to a user in a fully distributed fashion. This is, for instance, beneficial in cases where a high demand for a particular video content is imposed, as different users can receive the same data from different peers. Furthermore, due to the heterogeneous nature of Internet connectivity, the content needs to be delivered to a user through networks with highly varying bandwidths. Moreover, content needs to be displayed on a variety of devices featuring different sizes, resolutions, and computational capabilities. If video is encoded in a scalable way, it can be adapted to any required spatio-temporal resolution and quality in the compressed domain, according to a peer bandwidth and other peers¿ context requirements. This enables efficient low-complexity content adaptation and interoperability for improved peer-to-peer streaming in future Internet applications. An efficient piece picking and peer selection policy enables high quality of service in such a streaming system. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Osman Gebizlioglu
Huawei Technologies