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Intelligent Systems, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan.-Feb. 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • [Table of contents - Front cover]

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  • Contents

    Page(s): 1
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  • Back to the Future: Surrogates, Mirror Worlds, and Parallel Universes

    Page(s): 2 - 4
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  • AI's 10 to Watch

    Page(s): 5 - 15
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    It has been a tradition for IEEE Intelligent Systems to acknowledge 10 accomplished AI researchers in their early careers every two years as "AI's 10 to Watch." These researchers have all completed their doctoral work in the past couple of years. A wide range of senior AI researchers across the world, including primarily academics but also industry researchers, were contacted to nominate young star researchers in all disciplines of AI. A committee comprising members of our advisory and editorial boards reviewed these nominations and unanimously agreed on the top 10, whom we present to you in this special section. We would like to congratulate these young researchers for winning this special recognition. We are proud to present this glimpse of the future of AI and the practicing AI researchers who promise to be the leaders of the field. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Intelligent Systems Commends Volunteer Reviewers

    Page(s): 16 - 17
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  • In the News

    Page(s): 18 - 21
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  • Society Online, Part 2 [Guest editors' introduction]

    Page(s): 22 - 25
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  • Measuring Expertise in Online Communities

    Page(s): 26 - 32
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    Online communities have become important venues where Web users interact with each other and share their favorite items. Websites let users organize their favorite items online and benefit from one another's collections. This article discusses the notions of experts and expertise in the context of online communities. View full abstract»

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  • Offloading Cognition onto the Web

    Page(s): 33 - 39
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    Neuropsychology and neuroimaging studies have confirmed what we all knew already from introspection: some of our know-how is conscious, but most of it is not. Learning, skill, knowledge, and memory all come in two forms: explicit, in which we are aware of-and can hence describe in words-how we are able to do something, and implicit, in which we are unaware of how we are doing something. Most cognitive science is devoted to discovering the implicit mechanisms underlying our cognitive competence and making them explicit. Conscious introspection does not reveal what they are. The explanatory goal of cognitive science is to reverse-engineer what it takes to pass the Turing Test. That is, once we can successfully design a system that is capable of doing whatever any normal person can do, indistinguishably from any person, to any person, then we have a candidate explanation of how the human brain does it. In modeling human cognitive capacity, we must consider what to build into our candidate mechanism and what to offload onto external cognitive technology, such as Google Web searches. Word meanings can be internally represented in two ways: sensorimotor and verbal. In this work we tested conjunctive and disjunctive Google searches for target terms that have their own Wikipedia entries, using either the target terms themselves or the three words that had the highest co occurrence frequency with the target words in WordNet. We found that the highly co-occurring words were surprisingly ineffective in retrieving the target word and there was no significant correlation with age of acquisition or concreteness. This raises some questions about the similarity between human associative memory and Google-based associative search. View full abstract»

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  • Implications of the Mobile Web for Online-Offline Reputation Systems

    Page(s): 40 - 47
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    Web users' primary access points are shifting from desktops and laptops to ubiquitous mobile devices. This leads to more diverse assessment data and will enable new forms of collective activity. View full abstract»

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  • Trust- and Distrust-Based Recommendations for Controversial Reviews

    Page(s): 48 - 55
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    The paper is discussing well-known trust enhanced information filtering techniques for recommending controversial reviews by the recommender systems. View full abstract»

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  • Introducing New Features to Wikipedia: Case Studies for Web Science

    Page(s): 56 - 61
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    Wikipedia is a free Web based encyclopedia produced by hundreds of thousands of online contributors. Today, Wikipedia offers more than 10 million articles and is available in more than 250 languages. For some of these languages, Wikipedia is not just free, but the only encyclopedia. Wikipedia is a complex sociotechnical process. View full abstract»

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  • Wings: Intelligent Workflow-Based Design of Computational Experiments

    Page(s): 62 - 72
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    Describes the Wings intelligent workflow system that assists scientists with designing computational experiments by automatically tracking constraints and ruling out invalid designs, letting scientists focus on their experiments and goals. View full abstract»

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  • Cloud Computing for Agent-Based Urban Transportation Systems

    Page(s): 73 - 79
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    Agent-based traffic management systems can use the autonomy, mobility, and adaptability of mobile agents to deal with dynamic traffic environments. Cloud computing can help such systems cope with the large amounts of storage and computing resources required to use traffic strategy agents and mass transport data effectively. This article reviews the history of the development of traffic control and management systems within the evolving computing paradigm and shows the state of traffic control and management systems based on mobile multiagent technology. View full abstract»

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  • Trends and Controversies

    Page(s): 80 - 89
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    This issue includes two articles with additional research examples from distinguished experts in social science and computer science. In the first article, "Secondary Avatars and Semiautonomous Agents" presents semiautonomous agent assistants that have been incorporated into recent MMOGs. In the second article, a group of people constructed combat, mentoring, and trust networks based on data from Sony's popular MMOG Everquest II. They also provide an excellent summary of their ongoing research in performance and learning, player churn analysis, and identifying undesirable behavior in MMOGs. The authors argue that the close collaboration between social scientists and computer scientists is creating an emerging area called "computational social science," where computation is used as an integral mechanism in social science research. View full abstract»

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  • Using Agents to Improve International Maritime Transport Security

    Page(s): 90 - 96
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    Agent-based techniques have the potential to improve the security of international maritime transport threatened by a steep rise of maritime piracy. We have demonstrated that a randomized route-selection strategy resulting from a normal two-player game formulation of the transit problem can decrease the number of attacks and the payoff accumulated by pirates. Coordinating the movement of patrol and transit vessels without a central authority requires techniques for semi-cooperative planning and coalition formation. With regard to existing applications of agent-based techniques, the maritime domain seems currently under-represented compared to other traffic and transportation domains. This work is a first step in addressing the situation and bringing this important domain into the focus of researchers in the multiagent systems field. View full abstract»

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  • [Advertisement - Back cover]

    Page(s): c3
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  • [Advertisement - Back cover]

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Intelligent Systems serves users, managers, developers, researchers, and purchasers who are interested in intelligent systems and artificial intelligence, with particular emphasis on applications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Daniel Zeng
University of Arizona