By Topic

Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 2011

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 26
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): C1 - C4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (36 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Education publication information

    Page(s): C2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (41 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Enhancing Learning in Introductory Computer Science Courses Through SCALE: An Empirical Study

    Page(s): 1 - 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1096 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The work presented in this paper aims to support and promote the learning process in introductory computer science courses through the Web-based, adaptive, activity-oriented learning environment known as Supporting Collaboration and Adaptation in a Learning Environment (SCALE). The environment engages students actively in the learning process and supports them with multiple informative and tutoring feedback components. The exploitation of appropriately developed educational material, which was provided through SCALE, showed that SCALE can be a valuable tool for supporting the learning process in introductory computer science courses. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Laboratory Testbed for Embedded Fuzzy Control

    Page(s): 14 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (445 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a novel scheme called “Laboratory Testbed for Embedded Fuzzy Control of a Real Time Nonlinear System.” The idea is based upon the fact that project-based learning motivates students to learn actively and to use their engineering skills acquired in their previous years of study. It also fosters initiative and focuses students' attention on authentic real-world problems. At the same time, it enhances their learning. Students gain hands-on experience and improve their skills in product development, self-directed learning, teamwork, and project management. There has been a tremendous rise in the popularity of intelligent control techniques like fuzzy logic for use in industrial control applications in recent times. These techniques, which were primarily conceived for nonlinear control applications, are best implemented using embedded controllers, which can use their capabilities to the maximum. While courses in electrical and computer engineering cover several areas like digital and analog integrated circuits, microprocessors and control Systems, and process control, few of these integrate all these areas with focus on the application of intelligent techniques in real-time systems. Also, there is a growing need in industry for engineers who can perform software design and system integration for various applications in embedded control. This paper aims at developing such a practical task as one of the major projects in the eighth semester of the program offered by the Instrumentation and Control Engineering (ICE) Department of Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology (NSIT), Delhi University, India, to design a real-time embedded controller implementing an intelligent control technique, fuzzy logic, for control applications. These applications might, for example, be level control, flow control, or pressure control. The paper discusses an example of a real-time pressure control system for which a microcontroller-based fuzzy proportional-i- - ntegral-derivative (PID) controller has been simulated and implemented with satisfactory results. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Wireless Sensor Networks—A Hands-On Modular Experiments Platform for Enhanced Pedagogical Learning

    Page(s): 24 - 33
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (678 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents the use of wireless sensor net works (WSNs) in educational research as a platform for enhanced pedagogical learning. The aim here with the use of a WSN plat form was to go beyond the implementation stage to the real-life ap plication stage, i.e., linking the implementation to real-life applications, where abstract theory and algorithmic implementations become natural tools for the execution of application itself. Abstract theoretical concepts are illustrated through hands-on modular experiments in a host of diverse electrical and computer engineering courses. The WSN consists of Mica2 motes with on-board sensors, wireless communication antennas, and processors that are programmed using NesC. Three sets of experiments feeding into different courses [on topics such as wireless embedded networks, detection and estimation theory, stochastic processes, probability theory, statistical pattern recognition, and digital signal processing (DSP)] and illustrating different theoretical concepts are presented in detail. These experiments can be used as demos in those courses and/or can be incorporated as hands-on laboratory projects to go hand in hand with the course in which they are introduced. Also presented is the assessment of the experiments as pedagogical tools, made by means of well-designed evaluation questionnaires given to the students. Both the sensor network platform and the novel experiments built on this platform are found to be pedagogically successful tools for learning about and teaching the theoretical concepts introduced in those courses. The assessment survey shows that students who had very little knowledge on average before the demonstrations/experiments gained extensive knowledge and interest in the subject matter after going through them. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Microcircuit Modeling and Simulation Beyond Ohm’s Law

    Page(s): 34 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (625 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Circuit theory textbooks rely heavily on the applicability of Ohm's law, which collapses as electronic components reach micro- and nanoscale dimensions. Circuit analysis is examined in the regime where the applied voltage V is greater than the critical voltage Vc, which triggers the nonlinear behavior. The critical voltage is infinity in the Ohmic regime, but is as low as a fraction of a volt when linear current-voltage characteristics become sublinear and the resistance surges due to current saturation effects. For two resistors of the same Ohmic values but of differing lengths, the shorter resistor is more susceptible to this effect. In addition, the power consumed in this regime is a linear function of voltage as compared to quadratic behavior in the Ohmic regime. Several possible applications are suggested. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Using LEGO NXT Mobile Robots With LabVIEW for Undergraduate Courses on Mechatronics

    Page(s): 41 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (688 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The paper proposes lab work and student competitions based on the LEGO NXT Mindstorms kits and standard LabVIEW. The goal of this combination is to stimulate design and experimentation with real hardware and representative software in courses where mobile robotics is adopted as a motivating platform to introduce mechatronics competencies. Basic LabVIEW examples are proposed for three case-study laboratory practices. These are implemented with the NXT Toolkit and the NXT Direct Command programming libraries for standalone and remote execution, respectively. The application of this instructional material has been tested in two different experiences with senior undergraduate engineering students. A description of the courses as well as an assessment of student results are also included. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Emulation-Based Virtual Laboratories: A Low-Cost Alternative to Physical Experiments in Control Engineering Education

    Page(s): 48 - 55
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (594 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper argues the case for emulation-based virtual laboratories in control engineering education. It demonstrates that such emulation experiments can give students an industrially relevant educational experience at relatively low cost. The paper also describes a particular emulation-based system that has been developed with the aim of giving students an introduction to real-world control engineering design. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Multiple-Sessions Interactive Computer-Based Learning Tool for Ability Cultivation in Circuit Simulation

    Page(s): 56 - 62
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (849 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An interactive computer-based learning tool with multiple sessions is proposed in this paper, which teaches students to think and helps them recognize the merits and limitations of simulation tools so as to improve their practical abilities in electrical circuit simulation based on the case of a power converter with progressive problems. The common problem of fast simulation and differential equation solver convergence are discussed in detail for the simulation of nonlinear power electronic circuits. Another special ratio for ripple restriction is proposed, taking practical work into consideration. Some design and simulation tradeoffs for corresponding problems are also presented. Such a learning tool can improve students' programming skills and inspire their interest in practical work as well. The practical tests-carried out at the Aichi Institute of Technology, Toyota, Japan, and Southeast University, Nanjing, China- validate the effectiveness of the learning tool. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Complex Problem Exercises in Developing Engineering Students' Conceptual and Procedural Knowledge of Electromagnetics

    Page(s): 63 - 66
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (132 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Complex multistep problem exercises are one way to enhance engineering students' learning of electromagnetics (EM). This study investigates whether exposure to complex problem exercises during an introductory EM course improves students' conceptual and procedural knowledge. The performance in complex problem exercises is compared to prior success in pre-engineering mathematics and physics courses and with success in the final exam. Students' conceptual knowledge is evaluated with the Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM). The data (N = 133) are collected from an undergraduate static field theory course at Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo, Finland. The data are analyzed using correlation and linear regression. The study shows that the complex problem exercises do not improve conceptual understanding of EM. However, complex problem exercises significantly enhance the students' procedural knowledge. In addition, students found problem exercises useful and relevant for their learning. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Exploring Three-Phase Systems and Synchronous Motors: A Low-Voltage and Low-Cost Experiment at the Sophomore Level

    Page(s): 67 - 76
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1766 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In order to meet changing curricular and societal needs, a three-phase system and synchronous motor laboratory experience for sophomore-level students in a wide variety of engineering majors was designed, implemented, and assessed. The experiment is unusual in its early placement in the curriculum, and in that it focuses primarily on basic understanding of balanced three-phase systems and synchronous motor operating principles. While a low-voltage three-phase system and subfractional-horsepower electric motors were used, experimental results proved to be reliable, accurate, and repeatable. Changes in student knowledge and confidence in the application of that knowledge was assessed and shown to have increased significantly in each case. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Electronics From the Bottom Up: Strategies for Teaching Nanoelectronics at the Undergraduate Level

    Page(s): 77 - 86
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (466 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Nanoelectronics is an emerging area of electrical and computer engineering that deals with the current-voltage behavior of atomic-scale electronic devices. As the trend toward ever smaller devices continues, there is a need to update traditional undergraduate curricula to introduce electrical engineers to the fundamentals of the field. These fundamentals encompass topics from quantum mechanics and condensed-matter physics, and they pose new teaching challenges in electronics education; specifically, unconventional ideas must be presented in a rapid and yet complete way so that engineering undergraduates can quickly yet satisfyingly absorb the key concepts, and then apply these concepts to emerging devices. This paper describes the strategies employed by the author in teaching the subject to large undergraduate classes at his institution. These strategies include the use of computer visualization, a careful introduction of quantum mechanics, and a constant demonstration of the relevance of theory by practical examples and calculations. The effectiveness of the approach is illustrated through survey results of the Universal Student Ratings of Instruction at the author's institution and by way of typical assignment and exam questions that demonstrate the level of sophistication that students can attain in what might otherwise be viewed as a purely mathematical and esoteric subject. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Project-Based Learning and Rubrics in the Teaching of Power Supplies and Photovoltaic Electricity

    Page(s): 87 - 96
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (804 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Project-based learning (PBL) and cooperative learning are, in various aspects, very superior education methodologies compared to other traditional ones. They are highly appropriate methodologies for elective courses, as they exert a strong attraction on the students, quite apart from their educational advantages. This paper describes how PBL and cooperative learning have been used to teach the topics of power supplies and photovoltaic electricity within two elective undergraduate courses. A project is carried out for each of the two topics. Moodle is used as the e-learning platform to provide the course materials and the wiki resource and to allow the submission of assignments. The simulation is done by means of Simulink. Work has been done to develop skills for project planning, group management of the work, technical document writing and presentations in public. The methodology has been seen to be successful, as all the students who have followed it over the last few years have passed the courses in which it was included, Design of Industrial Applications and Industrial Electronics. Examples of the rubrics for assessing the projects and examples of the projects themselves are also included. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Remote Multivariable Control Design Using a Competition Game

    Page(s): 97 - 103
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (618 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, some approaches to teaching multi variable control design are discussed, with special attention being devoted to a step-by-step transition to e-learning. The approach put into practice and presented here is developed through design projects, from which one is chosen as a competition game and is realized using the E-CHO system, Matlab, and a laboratory pilot plant. All the preparations for the game can be completed using a remote virtual and actual laboratory device, while the final competition evaluation takes place in the laboratory in order to preserve personal contacts between the students and the staff. The methods described, comprising all the important e-education elements, were found to stimulate the students' interest and speed up the learning process, and are directly extendable to different forms of courses suitable for new forms of study and education promotion, including lifelong education. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Switching-Mode Power Supply Design Tool to Improve Learning in a Power Electronics Course

    Page(s): 104 - 113
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1074 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The static design of ac/dc and dc/dc switching-mode power supplies (SMPS) relies on a simple but repetitive process. Although specific spreadsheets, available in various computer-aided design (CAD) programs, are widely used, they are difficult to use in educational applications. In this paper, a graphic tool programmed in MATLAB is presented, which allows students to apply and to reflect upon the knowledge acquired in theoretical classes. This tool has been successfully employed in the course “Sistemas Electrónicos de Alimentación” in the Telecommunications Engineering degree as part of a project in new education methods (University of Oviedo project PB-08-019). During practical sessions, the students used the tool to design a SMPS, achieving better learning results than was the case without the tool. In addition, the tool was successfully used to improve the students' theoretical knowledge of the subject. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Collaborative Learning Using Wiki Web Sites for Computer Science Undergraduate Education: A Case Study

    Page(s): 114 - 124
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1274 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes a collaborative approach to enhancing the student learning experience based on Web 2.0 principles. Specifically, wiki Web sites are used by students for collaboration and for publication of course assignments, which are then shared with the class. Web 2.0 principles include: the Web as platform, harnessing collective intelligence, data are the next Intel Inside, and rich user experiences. Based on a case study in a junior-level undergraduate class, this paper studies a set of six factors with comprehensive grading and evaluation criteria that are critical to make this approach successful. The six factors are knowledge base, motivation, research, social aspects, presentation, and feedback and support. The data collected show that most of the students who participated feel that this approach is exciting and rewarding, and that even some undergraduate students are able to produce original and innovative concepts. The data also show other interesting phenomena with respect to motivation, undergraduate research, and social aspects. Finally, the paper proposes a methodology of conducting a wiki project in a university class using a cyclic constant improvement process. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Source Code Plagiarism—A Student Perspective

    Page(s): 125 - 132
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (168 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper considers the problem of source code plagiarism by students within the computing disciplines and reports the results of a survey of students in Computing departments in 18 institutions in the U.K. This survey was designed to investigate how well students understand the concept of source code plagiarism and to discover what, if any, specific aspects might cause particular confusion. An analysis of the results was carried out to assess understanding by topic and to discover whether various demographic factors may have an influence on that understanding. Within the survey sample, it appeared that the demographic factors tested did not generally affect students' understanding of source code plagiarism. However, analysis of the data for specific topics revealed that there are several areas of activity where the boundary between acceptable and unacceptable behavior is not clearly understood. These findings have implications for plagiarism education programs. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Understanding Optical Trapping Phenomena: A Simulation for Undergraduates

    Page(s): 133 - 140
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (711 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Optical trapping is an attractive and multidisciplinary topic that has become the center of attention to a large number of researchers. Moreover, it is a suitable subject for advanced students that requires a knowledge of a wide range of topics. As a result, it has been incorporated into some syllabuses of both undergraduate and graduate programs. In this paper, basic concepts in laser trapping theory are reviewed. To provide a better understanding of the underlying concepts for students, a Java application for simulating the behavior of a dielectric particle trapped in a highly focused beam has been developed. The program illustrates a wide range of theoretical results and features, such as the calculation of the force exerted by a beam in the Mie and Rayleigh regimes or the calibration of the trap stiffness. Some examples that are ready to be used in the classroom or in the computer lab are also supplied. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • RHE: A JVM Courseware

    Page(s): 141 - 148
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (790 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Java Virtual Machine (JVM) education has become essential in training embedded software engineers as well as virtual machine researchers and practitioners. However, due to the lack of suitable instructional tools, it is difficult for students to obtain any kind of hands-on experience and to attain any deep understanding of JVM design. To address this issue, the authors designed the RHE, or Reduced Harmony for Education, a lightweight instructional JVM. The RHE is extremely simple and yet contains all essential modules of a JVM. Furthermore, it comes with several test programs designed to familiarize users with the modules of JVM. In the past few years, the authors have successfully used the RHE to train new engineers on the JVM technology. The training experience shows that with the RHE, it takes less than 40 h for engineers with little or no prior knowledge of JVM design to become familiar with the essential JVM components. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Design of NetSecLab: A Small Competition-Based Network Security Lab

    Page(s): 149 - 155
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (201 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes a competition-style of exercise to teach system and network security and to reinforce themes taught in class. The exercise, called NetSecLab, is conducted on a closed network with student-formed teams, each with their own Linux system to defend and from which to launch attacks. Students are expected to learn how to: 1) install the specified Linux distribution; 2) set up the required services; 3) find ways to harden the box; 4) explore attack methods; and 5) compete. The informal write-up at the end of the lab focuses on their research into defense and attack methods, which contributes to their grade, while their competition score is dependent on their abilities to attack during the competition. Surveys were performed to evaluate the efficacy of the exercise in teaching system security. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • How to Teach Residue Number System to Computer Scientists and Engineers

    Page(s): 156 - 163
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (433 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The residue number system (RNS) has been an important research field in computer arithmetic for many decades, mainly because of its carry-free nature, which can provide high-performance computing architectures with superior delay specifications. Recently, research on RNS has found new directions that have resulted in the introduction of efficient algorithms and hardware implementations for RNS with much better performance than previous ones. Furthermore, the applicability of RNS in many computer and digital signal processing (DSP) applications has simultaneously greatly increased. Hence, the need is evident for the development of a new and well-organized RNS teaching method with emphasis on recent achievements. In this paper, a step-by-step teaching process for RNS that describes RNS design in separate parts is presented. Each part is investigated in detail, taking into account the recent research performed on RNS. The compatibility of the proposed method with the new RNS research trends makes this method suitable for researchers as well as students. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Enhancement of Student Learning Through the Use of a Hinting Computer e-Learning System and Comparison With Human Teachers

    Page(s): 164 - 167
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (436 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper reports the results of an experiment in a Computer Architecture Laboratory course classroom session, in which students were divided into two groups for interaction both with a hinting e-learning system and with human teachers generating hints. The results show that there were high learning gains for both groups, demonstrating the effectiveness of the human teachers as well as of the computer-based hinting e-learning system even without the use of adaptive and personalization capabilities. In addition, in the worst case, the difference in favor of human teachers (with a low student-to-teacher ratio of 13.5 students per teacher) would not be significant with respect to the e-learning system, so the computer-based system can replace teachers without a significant loss of effectiveness. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Measuring the Effects of Virtual Pair Programming in an Introductory Programming Java Course

    Page(s): 168 - 170
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (127 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This study investigated the effectiveness of virtual pair programming (VPP) on student performance and satisfaction in an introductory Java course. Students used online tools that integrated desktop sharing and real-time communication, and the metrics examined showed that VPP is an acceptable alternative to individual programming experience. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • IEEE RITA

    Page(s): 171
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (141 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Foundation [advertisement]

    Page(s): 172
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (320 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University