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Microelectromechanical Systems, Journal of

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 46
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C1 - 2
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  • Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems publication information

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C2
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  • 2010 reviewers list

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 3 - 5
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  • Fabrication of Complex Structures on Nonplanar Surfaces Through a Transfer Method

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 6 - 8
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (497 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We report on a method to fabricate complex microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) structures onto a flexible membrane. Three-dimensional and high-aspect-ratio MEMS structures were formed on a silicon-on-insulator wafer by deep reactive-ion etching and then were partially buried in a flexible polymer membrane. After being released from the silicon substrate, the flexible membrane with the complex structures could deform to curvilinear shapes and then could be transferred onto curvilinear surfaces. The effect of the structure and density of the pillars on the transferring procedure is studied. Potentially, this method could be utilized to transfer any MEMS structures and devices to any nonplanar surfaces, thus possessing great potential in MEMS devices. View full abstract»

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  • Enhancing Mass Transport for Synthesizing Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes via Micro Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 9 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (295 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Miniaturization is introduced as a novel methodology to enhance mass transport in a chemical vapor deposition process. As a result, amorphous carbon formation during the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be deterred. Miniaturization also maintains a laminar flow pattern to ensure a stable growth condition. A system with micrometer-sized reaction chambers has been constructed to experimentally verify this concept. The results show that clean and small-diameter SWNTs with approximately millimeter length can be quickly synthesized using ethylene as the source gas. Similar experimental parameters in a conventional large-scale system failed to produce SWNTs with comparable quality due to catalyst poisoning. View full abstract»

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  • Highly Integrable Flow Regulator With Positive Gain

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 12 - 14
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    This letter presents a highly integrable geometry for microfluidic flow regulators with positive gain. The objective of integration requires membranes to be small in diameter and the total area of the device as reduced as possible. For this, a flexible material is needed, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was chosen, with a suitable fabrication process designed for it. However, the use of a material which is too flexible leads to partial or complete obstruction of the working channel when the device is operating due to an undesired deformation of some parts of the structure. A change on the internal geometry of the device was designed, changing the shape of one membrane from circular to pseudo-elliptical. The external dimensions are 4000 and 2000 μm. When compared to previous devices, the gain relative to working pressure is increased from 0.034 to 0.16 mL/(min · bar2) , and the flow regulation from 1 to 1.4 mL/min. View full abstract»

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  • Two-Dimensional MEMS Stage Integrated With Microlens Arrays for Laser Beam Steering

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 15 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (388 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A novel microelectromechanical stage with one uniaxial set of combs capable of 2-D actuation is presented. A polymer microlens array (MLA) is mounted vertically onto the stage. Driven at resonance, the stage deflects 124 μm out of plane and 34 μm in plane. Finally, laser beam steering is demonstrated using two cascaded MLAs. View full abstract»

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  • Annealing Temperature-Dependent Interfacial Behavior of Sequentially Plasma-Activated Silicon Bonded Wafers

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 17 - 20
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (434 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The annealing effects of voids, amorphous layer, and bonding strength in the sequentially plasma-activated silicon/silicon bonded interface were investigated. The interfacial silanol groups and water were condensed and removed, respectively, below and above annealing at 150°C. About 400°C, the bonding strength was reduced because of the increased void density associated with the plasma-induced surface defects and the increased thickness of interfacial silicon oxide. The increase of the interfacial thickness layer after annealing was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscope and detected as silicon oxide using the electron energy loss spectroscopy. The surface roughness and contact angle were measured to explain the influence of plasma processing parameters on the interfacial behavior after annealing. While the water contact angle increased with the increase in the O2 reactive ion etching (RIE) time, the surface roughness was initially decreased and then increased. The surface activation with 400-W O2 RIE plasma induced defect sites such as nanopores and craters. This study indicates that the O2 RIE plasma time and power have to be as low as possible to reduce surface roughness and defects but have to be high enough to properly activate the surface with enough surface energy to achieve high quality of Si/Si interface. View full abstract»

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  • Small-Scale Deposition of Thin Films and Nanoparticles by Microevaporation Sources

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 21 - 27
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    This paper reports on a novel miniaturized deposition technique based on micro-hotplates which are used as microevaporation sources (MES) for a localized deposition of thin films and nanoparticles. The feasibility of this small-scale deposition technique and its general properties are shown for depositions of Ag on unpatterned and microstructured substrates. The deposited films are rotationally symmetric and show a distinct lateral thickness change. We take advantage of this latter effect, as, e.g., all stages of film condensation can be observed within one experiment on one sample, in a size suitable for transmission electron microscopy investigations. For realizing the most laterally confined depositions, a micro-Knudsen cell was used. It is shown that the use of MES is also very suitable for the fabrication and deposition of nanoparticles. View full abstract»

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  • Three-Dimensional Shell Fabrication Using Blow Molding of Bulk Metallic Glass

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 28 - 36
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (703 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A blow molding method based on thermoplastic forming of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is used to fabricate 3-D microshells. The 3-D microshells are attached to the Si wafer through mechanical locking, which is achieved in the same processing step. Versatile sizes and shapes of the 3-D shells can be precisely controlled. High strength ( >; 1 GPa), elasticity (~ 2%), and controlled surface roughness (<; 2 nm), which are achievable for BMGs, suggest their potential use in devices, including resonators, microlenses, microfluidic, and packaging. View full abstract»

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  • Dual Metallic Pattern Transfer Based on Metal-Film Contact Imprinting Lithography

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 37 - 41
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    This paper reports a novel pattern transfer method which can transfer two patterned metal films from one single mold to two separate polymer substrates. The first metallic film is defined by the top convex surface of a silicon mold and is transferred to a polymer substrate directly from roller-assisted contact printing and infrared heating. The second metallic film, which is defined by the bottom concave surface of the same silicon mold, is transferred to another polymer substrate through the mechanism of UV imprinting and curing processes. This new method not only can most efficiently utilize the metal films deposited on a mold but also can save the effort in mold cleaning for reusing the mold for continuous printing processes. Furthermore, since the two metallic patterns are highly complementary to each other all over the entire patterned area, new and important applications can be applied. A number of experiments have been carried out, and the feasibility of this new lithography approach is confirmed. View full abstract»

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  • On-Chip Integration of Acceleration, Pressure, and Temperature Composite Sensor With a Single-Sided Micromachining Technique

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 42 - 52
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (779 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Abstract-This paper presents a novel composite sensor that is monolithically integrated with an accelerometer, a pressure sensor, and a thermometer by using a single-side-processed micromachining technique. Such composite sensors are highly demanded in tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) applications. Based on heat convection, the accelerometer consists of a microheater and a pair of detector to measure the acceleration-induced temperature distribution change. Thermopile- and thermistor-based detectors both have been used to measure the temperature distribution change. Under a heating power of 10.9, 19.4, and 30.3 mW, the sensitivity of the thermopile-based accelerometer is measured as 37.92, 85.04, and 134.08 μV/g, respectively (while the thermistor based accelerometer shows a sensitivity of 25.96, 55.79, and 86.67 μV/g). The two detecting methods both feature enough frequency range that is higher than 100 Hz. In the pressure sensor, the low-stress silicon nitride diaphragm is designed into a narrow rectangular shape, on which four polysilicon piezoresistors are configured into a Wheatstone bridge. The sensitivity of the 450-KPa-ranged pressure sensor is measured as 45.9 mV/3 V FS, the nonlinearity is ±0.84% FS, and the over-range capability is ten times the measured range. The tire temperature monitoring thermometer is also made up of polysilicon and is measured with a linear resistance change versus temperature over the range of -40 °C-+100 °C. In the on-chip integrated sensors, a low-stress silicon nitride thin film is used as the electric isolation layer, the pressure diaphragm, and the heating-insulating freestanding beams. The boron-doped polysilicon film is used as the piezoresis tors, the heater, the thermopile, and the thermometer. After wafer level packaging with an aligned adhesive bonding technique, the 2.5 × 2.5 × 0.84 mm3 microsensor chips are promising for TPMS low-cost fabrication- - and volume applications. View full abstract»

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  • Fatigue Insensitivity of Nanoscale Freestanding Aluminum Films

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 53 - 58
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    We demonstrate a microelectromechanical-system-based setup for fatigue studies on 200-nm-thick freestanding aluminum specimens in situ inside the transmission electron microscope. The specimens did not show any sign of fatigue damage even at 1.2 ×106 cycles under nominal stresses about 80% of the static ultimate strength. We show direct evidence to propose that the conventional theory of fatigue crack nucleation through slip bands does not work for nanoscale freestanding thin films, which gives rise to the anomalous fatigue insensitivity. View full abstract»

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  • Ferrofluid-Impregnated Paper Actuators

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 59 - 64
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    In this paper, we report on an inexpensive method of fabricating miniature magnetic actuators using ferrofluid impregnated paper. Different types of papers (including soft tissue paper, cleanroom paper, Whatman-1 filter paper, printer paper, and newspaper) were loaded with oil-based ferrofluid, microma-chined by a CO2 laser and coated with a thin layer of parylene-C. The soaking capability of the different papers was investigated, with the soft tissue paper having the highest loading capacity, being able to absorb ferrofluid by as much as six times its original weight. Cantilever actuators fabricated from cleanroom and filter papers were able to generate the largest force (>; 40-mg equiva lent force), whereas the soft-tissue-paper cantilevers provided the greatest deflection (40° tip angle). View full abstract»

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  • Magnetic, Mechanical, and Optical Characterization of a Magnetic Nanoparticle-Embedded Polymer for Microactuation

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 65 - 72
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1094 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We have characterized the magnetic, mechanical, and optical properties of SU-8 polymer with embedded nickel nanoparticles (SU8-Ni) of concentrations ranging from 0% to 12.5% Ni by weight. Magnetic characterization was performed using a micropolysilicon torsional actuator as well as via alternating gradient magnetometry. Mechanical properties were measured using nanoindentation, and optical measurements were acquired via spectrophotometry. This magnetic polymer offers several advantages as a micromechanical structural material, including biocompatibility, chemical resistance, thermal stability, low cost, and mechanical compliance for large deflections. It is suitable for fluidics and biomedical applications where remote low-power actuation is desired. View full abstract»

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  • Robust Si-Based Membranes for Fluid Control in Microbatteries Using Superlyophobic Nanostructures

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 73 - 82
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Mechanically robust superhydrophobic Si-based membranes are described. The membranes are prepared using microelectromechanical-systems-type processing and implement “nanonail” design features that enable superlyophobic (also called omniphobic, superolephobic) behavior. A variety of low- and high-surface-tension liquids are repelled by such porous membranes without liquid penetrating into the pores of the membrane. Electrowetting transitions have been successfully implemented as a way to demonstrate electrically triggered and tunable permeability of the structures. Long-term stability of the hydrophobic coatings based on fluoropolymers has been evaluated using contact angle measurements. Among those, Teflon-based coatings tend to show the best survivability in aqueous and organic electrolytes for periods longer than 200 days of continuous exposure at room temperature and at 60 °C. Such robust membranes are currently used in reserve microbattery technology and microfluidic devices and, potentially, could enable other applications involving fluid separation, fuel cells, and filtration. View full abstract»

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  • Micromachined Piezoresistive Accelerometers Based on an Asymmetrically Gapped Cantilever

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 83 - 94
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (856 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper reports the development of piezoresistive accelerometers based on an asymmetrically gapped cantilever which is composed of a bottom mechanical layer and a top piezoresistive layer separated by a gap. The asymmetrically gapped cantilever helps to increase the sensitivity and enables the majority of mechanical energy to be effectively used to strain the piezoresistive layer. An analytic model of the asymmetrically gapped cantilever was developed and verified using finite-element simulation. Design optimization was discussed based on the analytical model. A figure of merit was defined as the product of the signal-to-noise ratio and resonant frequency. It was demonstrated that the energy efficiency is a critical criterion of design optimization. The prototypes of the piezoresistive accelerometer were successfully fabricated using deep reactive-ion etching from both the front and back sides of silicon-on-insulator wafers. The fabricated devices were preliminarily characterized. A sensitivity of 0.36 mV/V/g and a fundamental resonant frequency of 4060 Hz were obtained. The noise of the fabricated device was also measured and analyzed. View full abstract»

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  • Fabrication of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers via Local Oxidation and Direct Wafer Bonding

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 95 - 103
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (868 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present the successful fabrication of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) with an improved insulation layer structure. The goal is to improve device reliability (electrical breakdown) and device performance (reduced parasitic capacitance). The fabrication is based on consecutive thermal oxidation steps, on local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS), and on direct wafer bonding. No chemical-mechanical polishing step is required during the device fabrication. Aside from the advantages associated with direct wafer bonding for CMUT fabrication (simple fabrication, cell shape flexibility, wide gap height range, good uniformity, well-known material properties of single-crystal materials, and low intrinsic stress), the main vertical dimension (electrode separation) is determined by thermal oxidation only, which provides excellent vertical tolerance control ( <;10 nm) and unprecedented uniformity across the wafer. Thus, we successfully fabricated CMUTs with gap heights as small as 40 nm with a uniformity of ±2 nm over the entire wafer. This paper demonstrates that reliable parallel-plate electrostatic actuators and sensors with gap heights in the tens of nanometer range can be realized via consecutive thermal oxidation steps, LOCOS, and direct wafer bonding without chemical-mechanical polishing steps. View full abstract»

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  • Modeling and Characterization of CMOS-Fabricated Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 104 - 118
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1664 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the fabrication, characterization, and modeling of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUTs). The transducers are fabricated using the interconnect and dielectric layers from a standard CMOS fabrication process. Unlike previous efforts toward integrating CMUTs with CMOS electronics, this process adds no microelectromechanical systems-related steps to the CMOS process and requires no critical lithography steps after the CMOS process is complete. Efficient computational models of the transducers were produced through the combined use of finite-element analysis and lumped-element modeling. A method for improved computation of the electrostatic coupling and environmental loading is presented without the need for multiple finite-element computations. Through the use of laser Doppler velocimetry, transient impulse response and steady-state frequency sweep tests were performed. These measurements are compared to the results predicted by the models. The performance characteristics were compared experimentally through changes in the applied bias voltage, device diameter, and medium properties (air, vacuum, oil, and water). Sparse clusters of up to 33 elements were tested in transmit mode in a water tank, achieving a center frequency of 3.5 MHz, a fractional bandwidth of 32%-44%, and pressure amplitudes of 181-184 dB re 1 μParms at 15 mm from the transducer on axis. View full abstract»

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  • Development of a CMOS-Based Capacitive Tactile Sensor With Adjustable Sensing Range and Sensitivity Using Polymer Fill-In

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 119 - 127
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1145 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper reports a capacitive-type CMOSmicroelectromechanical system tactile sensor containing a capacitance-sensing gap filled with polymer. Thus, the equivalent stiffness of the tactile sensor can be modulated by the polymer fill-in, so as to further tune its sensing range. Moreover, the polymer fill-in has a higher dielectric constant to increase the sensitivity of the tactile sensor. In short, the sensing range and sensitivity of the proposed tactile sensor can be easily changed by using the polymer fill-in. In application, the tactile sensor and sensing circuits have been designed and implemented using the 1) TSMC 0.35 μm 2P4M CMOS process and the 2) in-house post-CMOS releasing and polymer-filling processes. The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material with different curing agent ratios has been exploited as the fill-in polymers. The experiment results demonstrate that the equivalent stiffness of tactile sensors can be adjusted from 16.85 to 124.43 kN/m. Thus, the sensitivity of the tactile sensor increases from 1.5 to 42.7 mV/mN by varying the PDMS filling. Moreover, the maximum sensing load is also improved. View full abstract»

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  • Fast Positioning and Impact Minimizing of MEMS Devices by Suppression of Motion-Induced Vibration by Command-Shaping Method

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 128 - 139
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1346 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Electrostatic (ES) force is one of the most important actuation mechanisms for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices. However, residual vibration of microstructures induced by ES actuation can bring various problems that degrade dynamic performance and device longevity, such as long settling time, dynamic pull-in, and contact fatigue. By suppressing this undesirable effect, it is expected that both the dynamic performance and device reliability can be effectively enhanced. This paper presents a command-shaping-based scheme with experiment validation for both fast positioning and reduced contact impact of MEMS devices by the suppression of motion-induced vibrations. The scheme was developed by applying energy conservation, force equilibrium, and elliptical integrals. Simulink simulations indicate that both the impact force and settling time can be effectively reduced. In order to count the possible parameter variation and unmodeled dynamics, an online tuning scheme is also proposed and verified through simulation. Finally, spring-plate specimens fabricated using SU-8 with a metallic coating and a test bed containing a laser positioning sensor and a high voltage source are designed to further demonstrate the performance of the proposed scheme; the test results indicate that the proposed approach can effectively enhance the dynamic performance of MEMS devices such as grating light valves and RF switches. View full abstract»

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  • Multimodule Micro Transportation System Based on Electrostatic Comb-Drive Actuator and Ratchet Mechanism

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 140 - 149
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1513 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a novel multimodule micro transportation system (MTS), which can drive micro containers in straight, curved, and T-junction paths based on electrostatic comb-drive actuator and ratchet mechanism. The transported objects are micro containers, which have two pairs of driving wings and anti-reverse wings attached to a body. Their movement is like a water strider, i.e., its driving wings rotate backward to generate reaction force to push the containers forward, while the anti-reverse wings act as a ratchet mechanism to prevent the container from moving backward. By developing three basic modules, i.e., straight, turning, and T-junction modules, the different configurations of the MTS can be built from these modules conveniently. Each module consists of ratchet racks driven by electrostatic comb-drive actuators. Containers having length, width, and thickness of 500, 250, and 30 μm, respectively, were driven to move with a changeable velocity up to 1000 μm/sec in straight, turning, and T-junction modules. The velocity of the container was proportional to the frequency of driving voltage. By utilizing silicon micromachining technology, a prototype of MTS was fabricated from silicon-on-insulator wafer with only one mask. View full abstract»

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  • Electromechanical Sensing of Charge Retention on Floating Electrodes

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 150 - 156
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (686 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper considers the electromechanical response of electrostatic actuators that are driven by both voltage and charge. The model system is an electrostatic actuator in which the suspended electrode is subjected to a driving voltage and the fixed electrode, which is electrostatically floating, is loaded by charge. The response of the system is analyzed using energy methods, and it is shown that the system has two distinct pull-in voltages. It is also shown that the amplitude of charge on the floating electrode is proportional to the average of these two pull-in voltages. Test-actuators were designed, fabricated, and characterized, and their measured response validates the theoretical predictions. A nondisruptive measurement of charge is proposed and demonstrated which enables to monitor charge decay over time. View full abstract»

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  • Manipulating Vibration Energy Confinement in Electrically Coupled Microelectromechanical Resonator Arrays

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 157 - 164
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    This paper reports the first detailed experimental evidence of the phenomena of eigenvalue loci veering and vibration mode localization in microelectromechanical resonator arrays subjected to weak electroelastic coupling. A rapid but continuous interchange of the eigenfunctions associated with the eigenvalues is experimentally observed during veering as the variations in the eigenvalues are studied for induced stiffness variations on one of the coupled resonators. It is also noticed that the electrical tunability of the coupling spring constant in such microsystems enables a manipulation of the severity of modal interchange during veering and in consequence, the extent of energy confinement within the system. These results, while experimentally confirming the elastic behavior of such electrical coupling elements, also suggest that such microsystems provide a unique platform for investigating the general nature and properties of these dynamic phenomena under significantly weaker tunable coupling spring constants that are very difficult to implement in corresponding “macroscopic” systems. View full abstract»

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  • Modeling of Micromachined Beams Subject to Nonlinear Restoring or Damping Forces

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 165 - 177
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (435 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Electrostatic, Casimir, or squeeze-film damping forces are some of the many inverse power-law forces that may affect micromachined devices. The behavior of structures that are subject to such forces, even simple ones such as clamped-clamped or cantilever beams, is difficult to model in a way that is both computationally efficient and physically meaningful. The main contribution of this paper is a semianalytical modeling approach for microbeams that are subject to inverse power-law force densities, which is accurate, computationally efficient, and amenable to physical interpretation. This approach is based on the observation that, for large deformations, inverse power-law forces affect all mathematically equivalent shapes in the same way. Starting from reference shapes for which the analytical expressions of the Galerkin projection of the inverse power-law forces are known, semianalytical expressions are then established for all equivalent shapes, using a simple least squares fitting procedure. In a context of transient simulation, the resulting models are economical because they do not require costly deformation-dependent integral evaluations. Furthermore, they can be used to establish analytical expressions of relevant physical quantities. This approach is validated with simulated and experimental data and compared qualitatively and quantitatively to other reduced-order modeling methods. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The topics of interest include, but are not limited to: devices ranging in size from microns to millimeters, IC-compatible fabrication techniques, other fabrication techniques, measurement of micro phenomena, theoretical results, new materials and designs, micro actuators, micro robots, micro batteries, bearings, wear, reliability, electrical interconnections, micro telemanipulation, and standards appropriate to MEMS. Application examples and application oriented devices in fluidics, optics, bio-medical engineering, etc., are also of central interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Christofer Hierold
ETH Zürich, Micro and Nanosystems