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Network, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date January-February 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • IEEE Network - Front cover

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Life in the digital cloud

    Page(s): 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Inferring video QoE in real time

    Page(s): 4 - 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1842 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Inferring the subjective perception of a video stream in real time continues to be a stiff problem. This article presents MintMOS: a lightweight, no-reference, loadable kernel module to infer the QoE of a video stream in transit and offer suggestions to improve it. MintMOS revolves around one-time offline construction of a k-dimensional space, which we call the QoE space. A QoE space is a known characterization of subjective perception for any k parameters (network dependent/ independent) that affect it. We create N partitions of the QoE space by generating N video samples for various values of the k parameters and conducting subjective surveys using them. Every partition then has an expected QoE associated with it. Instantaneous parameters of a real-time video stream are compared to the precomputed QoE space to both infer and offer suggestions to improve QoE. Inferring QoE is a lightweight algorithm that runs in linear time. We implemented MintMOS by creating an actual QoE space using three parameters and 27 partitions by conducting surveys with 77 human subjects. In a second set of surveys using 13 video clips, MintMOS's predictions were compared to 49 human responses. Results show that our MOS predictions are in close agreement with subjective perceptions. View full abstract»

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  • On providing metro ethernet services over transparent WDM optical rings

    Page(s): 14 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (210 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The long list of benefits (especially cost and capacity) of Ethernet LANs has made the IEEE, the ITU-T, and the Metro Ethernet Forum define the requirements for taking Ethernet beyond the local area, toward the metropolitan region. In addition, the ever-increasing traffic demands of new applications and users can only be met by the huge bandwidth capacity provided by optical fibers. This work studies how to provide metro Ethernet services over transparent tunable-transmitter fixed-receiver WDM optical ring networks. A new adaptation layer of ME to WDM is proposed, and its benefits and drawbacks are studied. It is shown that such a transparent WDM ring network can be seen as a logical full-mesh topology by the upper ME layer, thus reducing to one the number of optical-electronic-optical conversions per unicast frame. Additionally, two different approaches are proposed in the case of broadcast/multicast traffic, since this may bring scalability difficulties in ring topologies. View full abstract»

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  • Control-level call differentiation in IMS-based 3G core networks

    Page(s): 20 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (233 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The 3GPP-defined IP Multimedia Subsystem is becoming the de facto standard for IP-based multimedia communication services. It consists of an overlay control and service layer that is deployed on top of IP-based mobile and fixed networks, in order to enable the seamless provisioning of IP multimedia services to 3G users. Service differentiation, which implies the network's ability to distinguish between different classes of traffic (or service) and provide each class with the appropriate treatment, is an important aspect that is considered in 3G networks. In this article, we present a critical review of existing service differentiation solutions and propose a new control-level call differentiation solution for IMS-based 3G core networks. The solution consists of a novel call differentiation scheme, enabling the definition of various categories of calls with different QoS profiles. To enable the support of such profiles, an extended IMS architecture, relying on two adaptive resource management mechanisms, is proposed. Furthermore, simulations are used to evaluate the system performance. Compared to existing service differentiation solutions, our solution offers several benefits, such as: flexible QoS negotiation mechanisms, control over many communication aspects as means for differentiation, and a dynamic and adaptive resource management strategy. View full abstract»

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  • Selective jamming/dropping insider attacks in wireless mesh networks

    Page(s): 30 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (900 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Wireless mesh networks promise to extend high-speed wireless connectivity beyond what is possible with the current WiFi-based infrastructure. However, their unique architectural features leave them particularly vulnerable to security threats. In this article we describe various forms of sophisticated attacks launched from adversaries with internal access to the WMN. We further identify possible detection and mitigation mechanisms. View full abstract»

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  • Fiber-wireless (FiWi) access networks: Challenges and opportunities

    Page(s): 36 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (238 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Hybrid fiber-wireless (FiWi) access networks aim at combining the huge amount of available bandwidth of optical networks and the ubiquity and mobility of wireless access networks with the objective to reduce their cost and complexity. This article highlights key enabling optical as well as wireless technologies and explains their role in emerging FiWi networks. After briefly reviewing previous art, important challenges and imperatives for the design of future FiWi network architectures, protocols, and algorithms are identified and discussed in detail. View full abstract»

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  • Toward scalable cut vertex and link detection with applications in wireless ad hoc networks

    Page(s): 44 - 48
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (187 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Ad hoc networks are expected to have some critical connectivity properties before partitioning. Timely partition prediction signals action for improving fault tolerance and performing some data or service replication so that the network can continue functioning after partition does occur. This article surveys existing prediction concepts and discusses their scalability, simplicity, correctness, speed, communication overhead, and applications. Existing centralized algorithms declare an edge or a node as critical if its removal will separate the network into several components. Several localized definitions of critical (or cut) nodes and links, and removable nodes, are demonstrated to be simple, useful, and scalable. A node is critical if the subgraph of p-hop neighbors of node (without the node itself) is disconnected. A link is critical if its endpoints have no common p-hop neighbors (assuming that the link between them does not exist). Definitions are extended toward local k-connectivity. The false positives mostly occur when alternative routes exist but are relatively long, and therefore may not provide satisfactory service in applications. Therefore, localized protocols provide faster and often more reliable partition warnings for possible timely replication decisions. This conceptual advance provides ingredients for establishing and restoring biconnectivity. View full abstract»

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  • SWATS: Wireless sensor networks for steamflood and waterflood pipeline monitoring

    Page(s): 50 - 56
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1566 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    State-of-the-art anomaly detection systems deployed in oilfields are expensive, not scalable to a large number of sensors, require manual operation, and provide data with a long delay. To overcome these problems, we design a wireless sensor network system that detects, identifies, and localizes major anomalies such as blockage and leakage that arise in steamflood and waterflood pipelines in oilfields. A sensor network consists of small, inexpensive nodes equipped with embedded processors and wireless communication, which enables flexible deployment and close observation of phenomena without human intervention. Our sensor-network-based system, Steamflood and Waterflood Tracking System (SWATS), aims to allow continuous monitoring of the steamflood and waterflood systems with low cost, short delay, and fine-granularity coverage while providing high accuracy and reliability. The anomaly detection and identification is challenging because of the inherent inaccuracy and unreliability of sensors and the transient characteristics of the flows. Moreover, observation by a single node cannot capture the topological effects on the transient characteristics of steam and water fluid to disambiguate similar problems and false alarms. We address these hurdles by utilizing multimodal sensing and multisensor collaboration, and exploiting temporal and spatial patterns of the sensed phenomena. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Network covers topics which include: network protocols and architecture; protocol design and validation; communications software; network control, signaling and management; network implementation (LAN, MAN, WAN); and micro-to-host communications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Xuemin (Sherman) Shen, PhD
Engineering University of Waterloo