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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 12 • Date December 2010

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 30
  • IEEE Communications Magazine

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2 - 4
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  • IEEE comsoc staff: agile, efficient teamwork [The President's Page]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 6 - 9
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  • W. David Sincoskie, pioneer of packet communications [Society News]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 10
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  • The fall - and future - WCET exams [Certification Corner]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 11
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  • Conference calendar

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 12
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  • New products

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 14
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Product spotlights

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 16
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  • Global Communications Newsletter

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1 - 4
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  • Consumer communication applications drive integration and convergence [Series Editorial]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This theme is strongly reflected in the articles we have selected for this edition of the Consumer Communications and Networking series. This theme includes the convergence of fixed and mobile networks, as well as new device and applications integration. Fixed and mobile convergence in particular is addressed by the first article by Raj, Narayan, Datta, and Das. They discuss features and requirements of fixed mobile convergence, focusing in detail on VoIP applications and looking into the future with VVoIP applications. View full abstract»

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  • Fixed mobile convergence: challenges and solutions

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 26 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1411 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Fixed mobile convergence is an emerging technology, which aims at integration and creation of a unified communication infrastructure from fixed and wireless mobile networks. In this converged communication infrastructure, users move across networks and access services seamlessly using different devices. Voice and video over IP is one of the emerging technologies in the realization of FMC. In this article we first discuss the features and technological requirements of FMC networks. We then present an architecture for implementing FMC and describe how to realize the voice call continuity of VoIP sessions using the current IP infrastructure. We further identify the requirements for VVoIP in ensuring video call continuity as well as the challenges associated with the migration from voice to multimedia services. View full abstract»

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  • Supporting mobile devices with wireless LAN/MAN in large controlled environments

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 36 - 43
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2333 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The functionality of mobile devices has grown exponentially in recent times. This has led to smart phones and the mobile Internet becoming a big success story. IEEE 802.11 wireless local area network, known as Wi-Fi, has become a standard feature on these devices and represents a viable alternative to using a mobile phone provider¿s network for connectivity. Users can surf the web, make VoIP calls, and more from their home WLAN networks or public hotspots. At present WLAN has too many outstanding issues to universally replace existing mobile phone networks. However, WLAN is ready to provide universal coverage for mobile devices in large controlled environments such as university and business campuses, sports stadia, and entertainment parks. In this article we outline the challenges in such a deployment and describe how the state of the art in WLAN can meet these challenges. Outstanding issues and areas requiring improvement are highlighted. With a view to overcoming these hurdles, some potential solutions and promising research directions are outlined. View full abstract»

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  • PLASH: a platform for location aware services with human computation

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 44 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2354 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The PLASH platform is designed to help location- aware service providers deploy their applications easily so that users can contribute their efforts and location-related data by using the services, which is the main difference from traditional location-aware services. The collective efforts and data that may be generated by humans or sensors (or both) can be used to help solve difficult location awareness problems, such as realtime surface traffic estimation, city panoramas, and social networking analysis. The PLASH platform comprises three layers: communication, data, and service. An LAS application developed on PLASH can exploit the functions provided in each layer by using an application specification language provided by PLASH. In addition, application builders can contribute their mature applications as a service accommodated in the service layer for other application builders to expand and create more sophisticated applications. View full abstract»

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  • TimeRemap: stable and accurate time in vehicular networks

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 52 - 57
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (406 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    One fundamental limit for synchronizing a packet trace is that the two measurement systems that can be used to timestamp the packets, the operating system and the network interface, have mutually exclusive properties. The OS clock can be stabilized over the long run but the OS timestamps are not accurate; the PHY timestamps are accurate but they show a drift. To leverage the best features of both systems, we propose to stabilize the OS clock with a GPS and to remap the PHY timestamps over the OS/GPS time. This method is well suited for challenged scenarios like VANETs as no signaling is needed between nodes. We apply our approach to VANET monitoring and evaluate it on packet traces collected from our testbed. The results show that our solution reduces the mean synchronization error to 3 μs. View full abstract»

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  • How NAT-compatible are VoIP applications?

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 58 - 65
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (250 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Today, the Internet is very diversified, further complicating the classic NAT traversal problems. In order to solve these problems, there are many proposed methods classified into two categories. One enhances the NAT traversal techniques of applications, and the other tries to modify the behavior of NATs. In this article we focus on the former because NATs have been installed, and their behavior cannot be altered through endpoint users. Accordingly, in order to test NAT traversal techniques of five VoIP applications (Skype, MSN, Google Talk, X-Lite, and Linphone), three network topologies have been designed with two endpoints behind the same, different, or multilevel NATs. Through a series of experiments and from the experiment results, we observe that these VoIP applications use some traversal techniques, such as NAT mappedaddress probe, peer discovery, path check, and relay first, proposed by STUN, TURN, and ICE to make a direct connection when endpoints are behind the same or different NATs with independent mapping rules. However, with multilevel NATs, no endpoints can establish a direct connection when they use the above mentioned techniques, even if hairpin behavior is supported by NATs. View full abstract»

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  • Sustainable energy-efficient wireless applications using light

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 66 - 73
    Cited by:  Papers (27)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1440 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As we step further into the 21st century, the demand for sustainable energy-efficient technology grows higher. The important area of electric lighting, currently dominated by decades-old incandescent and fluorescent sources, is being taken over by white light emitting diodes, which are solid state devices with much greater energy savings. Replacement of current inefficient lighting by these LEDs will result in reduction of global carbon dioxide emissions, a major cause of global warming, among other things. WLEDs hold the potential, in the field of photonics, to be as transformational as the transistor was in electronics. This core device has the potential to revolutionize how we use light, including not only for illumination, but also for communications, sensing, navigation, imaging, and many more applications. In this tutorial we highlight some of the potentials. View full abstract»

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  • Design and implementations series VI [Series Editorial]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 74 - 75
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  • Lessons learned on the usage of call logs for security and management in IP telephony

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 76 - 82
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (226 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Telephone network operation and management tasks rely on the collection of data logs to effectively troubleshoot problems and observe trends. As operators try to streamline their investments in monitoring systems, data logs collected for other purposes represent a valuable and handy source of information for these tasks. A common example for both traditional public switched telephone and IP telephony networks ones are call detail records (also termed call data records). These contain detailed information about telephone calls such as the identities of sources and destinations, the duration of each call, and reply codes. Unfortunately, the way CDRs are collected and their formats can vary significantly among different operators. Without careful consideration of the basic principles and requirements outlined in this article, the use of any type of data logs for traffic management, security, and engineering purposes can become quite cumbersome and even result in misleading conclusions. The intention of this article is to support other researchers and practitioners working with telephony logs. Therefore, we provide an overview of the most relevant lessons we have learned when dealing with massive amounts of CDRs from different operators, such as how to handle different non-standard logging formats across operators and understanding common sources of call log analysis errors. View full abstract»

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  • On campus beta site: architecture designs, operational experience, and top product defects

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 83 - 91
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2569 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Testing network products in a beta site to reduce the possibility of customer found defects is a critical phase before marketing. We design and deploy an innovative beta site on the campus of National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan. It can be used for developers to test and debug products, while maintaining network quality for network users. To satisfy the needs of developers, we set up environments and mechanisms, such as a variety of test zones for multiple types of products or systems under test (SUTs), remote control, degrees of traffic volume, and traffic profiling. For network users, we set up mechanisms of failure detection, notification, and recovery. The beta site network users are all volunteers. Test results show that beta site testing is good for finding stability and compatibility defects. The period starting from the beginning of a test until the next defect is found is called the time to fail (TTF). We call it converged if the TTF exceeds four weeks, and the convergence ratio is the percentage of SUTs that reach convergence. We find that the TTF increases with longer test duration, meaning that product quality improves through beta site testing. However, the convergence ratios are only 7 and 20 percent for test durations of one month and one year, respectively, meaning that few products operate faultlessly for a long duration. The convergence ratios also indicate that it takes much more time to enhance product quality to be converged. Therefore, if considering both marketing timing and product quality, one month is our suggested minimum TD for low-end and shortlife- cycle products. However, we recommend one year as the minimum TD for high-end and long-life-cycle products. View full abstract»

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  • RESTful web services for bridging presence service across technologies and domains: an early feasibility prototype

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 92 - 100
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (233 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A presence service enables the discovery and retrieval of, and subscription to changes in, an end user¿s context information. RESTful web services are now emerging as a lighter alternative to the so-called Big Web services. This article presents an early feasibility prototype of a RESTful web-services-based architecture. The architecture enables the discovery and retrieval of and subscription to changes in context information, independent of the technologies used in the end users¿ domains. Concretely, it enables end users with multiple presence accounts (e.g., MSN, Yahoo, Gmail) to publish context information related to the account(s) they are using at any given time. It also enables other end users or applications to retrieve this information by subscribing to any of the multiple accounts of the publisher. The project has demonstrated that RESTful web services are quite suitable for bridging services across technologies and domains. It has also demonstrated that a RESTful web services approach has several advantages over a traditional web services (also known as Big Web services) approach. However, more functionality needs to be added to the prototype before market introduction is contemplated. The lessons learned are discussed and the missing functionalities are identified. View full abstract»

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  • Key lessons from the scalable communications core: a reconfigurable wireless baseband

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 101 - 109
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1425 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The radios in mobile Internet devices and smart phones need to support a wide range of wireless standards for cellular, broadband, local, and personal area network connectivity, satellite navigation, and broadcast digital television in a small form factor with low energy consumption. The customary approach is to integrate an optimized antenna, front-end, baseband, and MAC for each protocol; however, any upgrades or modifications for new or different product definitions require a costly respin of the silicon. An alternative approach is to integrate flexible components including an antenna, front-end, baseband, and MAC into a radio that enables one set of hardware to satisfy multiple protocols and also provides scalability for protocol changes in the future; however, there is a penalty in terms of area and power that has to be considered. An example of a flexible baseband is the Scalable Communications Core. This core was developed by Intel Labs and consists of a heterogeneous set of coarse-grained programmable accelerators connected via a packet-based network-on-chip. To understand the area and power cost of the architecture, we taped out a prototype SCC test chip in a 65 nm CMOS process, and programmed and validated it for multiple protocols, including WiFi, WiMAX, GPS, Bluetooth, and DVB-H. This article summarizes our key results in architecture, programming, interconnection, and performance of a flexible baseband for realtime wireless communications applications. View full abstract»

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  • Network and service management series [Series Editorial]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 110 - 111
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  • On using mashups for composing network management applications

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 112 - 122
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1321 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Mashups are web applications created through the integration of external resources available on the web. They have been considered a hallmark of Web 2.0 technologies, allowing end users to develop their own applications and encouraging cooperation and reuse. However, their usage in the network management field remains unexploited. In this context, we look at Web 2.0 as a feasible mechanism able to integrate heterogeneous management information. In this article, we propose an architecture and a system prototype that allows network administrators to design their own management applications through the composition of external resources. The creation of mashups for two network management scenarios allowed us to both evaluate our architecture and, mainly, observe benefits, challenges, and opportunities that arise from such an approach. Observed characteristics, such as ease of use, extensibility, and contextspecific development, make mashups a candidate for an interesting area for further research in the network management field. View full abstract»

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  • Toward an architecture for the automated provisioning of cloud services

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 124 - 131
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (780 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The automated provisioning of services in cloud computing presents many challenges. Users can request virtual machines from cloud infrastructure providers, but these machines have to be configured and managed properly. This article describes an architecture that enables the automated deployment and management of the virtual infrastructure and software of services deployed in the cloud. The architecture takes a template description of a service, which encapsulates requirements, options, as well as behavior for a collection of resources and orchestrates the provisioning of this service into a newly created set of virtual resources. The template is used for integrating the deployment and reconfiguration behavior of a service in which logical components are described along with options to scale them and appropriately change their configuration. Services are described through a set of components, which can easily be mapped and remapped to dynamically created resources, letting services take full advantage of flexible cloud resources. View full abstract»

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  • Using a model-driven architecture for technology-independent scenario configuration in networking testbeds

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 132 - 141
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (379 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Networking testbeds are a key tool to design and experiment with new protocols, architectures, and services being proposed for future networks. The scenario-based configuration approach is a state-of-the-art testbed configuration mechanism that maximizes productivity in reconfigurable testbeds. However, commonly used scenario specification languages are highly coupled with the underlying testbed technologies. This fact precludes either the reusability of scenarios among different testbeds, or experimentation with complex test scenarios implemented over federated infrastructures proposed in projects like GENI, which comprise a combination of heterogeneous testbeds. In this article these issues are addressed by proposing a novel technology-independent scenario-based testbed configuration management architecture based on model-driven architecture principles. Our proposal takes into account general applicability and extensibility requirements, as well as seamless integration with existing testbeds. Furthermore, it has been experimentally validated with tests performed on actual testbeds. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Osman Gebizlioglu
Huawei Technologies