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Vehicular Technology Magazine, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date Dec. 2010

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): C1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology Special Section: Telematics Advances for Vehicular Communication Networks

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): C2
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1 - 2
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  • Mobile Radio and Land Transportation [From the Editor]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 3
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  • Battery Switching, Driving Dynamics, and Touch-Screen Control Input [Automotive Electronics]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 4 - 7
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  • US Plan to Release 500MHz of Spectrum [Mobile Radio]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 8 - 16
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  • Electric Locomotives [Transportation]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 17 - 20
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  • Report on VTS Land Transportation Activities [Land Transportation Activities]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 21 - 23
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  • Digital Audio Around the World

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 24 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1468 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    DR (or DAB) has been around for several decades but only now is it being adopted and implemented by the commercial broadcast community. There are four types of systems: Eureka 147, DRM, IBOC, and Satellite Digital Audio Radio. There are two types of implementation strategies: use of dedicated spectrum and reuse of existing spectrum for AM and FM broadcasting. Eureka 147 uses dedicated spectrum; DRM and IBOC reuse existing spectrum. In addition, SDAR makes use of terrestrial as well as satellite systems (XM and Sirius). Digital tuner costs vary from US$150.00 to US$1,000.00. Table 3 shows a comparison of each type of system. Although a principal purpose of DR is the enhancement of audio quality, this technology offers additional features such as the ability to integrate and broadcast text, data, and video, weather service information, and satellite maps of your location. In addition, DR technology is adopting the use of software to defined radio capabilities and features that will result in longer equipment life cycles and using common equipment in diverse applications. View full abstract»

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  • Wireless Cellular Networks

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 31 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1037 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    When aiming for achieving high spectral efficiency in wireless cellular networks, cochannel interference (CCI) becomes the dominant performance limiting factor. This article provides a survey of CCI mitigation techniques, where both active and passive approaches are discussed in the context of both open and closed-loop designs. View full abstract»

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  • Multiaccess Radio Network Enviroments

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 40 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1258 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Nowadays there is a plethora of independent radio access technologies (RATs), each supporting distinct coverage, mobility, data rates, and quality of service (QoS). The cornerstone of all visions on future wireless networks is that there will be a multiaccess network environment, where users will be able to select from various available multiple heterogeneous access networks the most appropriate one to satisfy specific application requirements. On the other hand, emerging applications call for the vehicular networks to support multimedia and real-time services. Future intelligent transportation Digital Object Identifier 10. Π09/MVT.2010.939107systems (ITSs) will therefore necessitate reliable wireless vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2Γ) communications, which can be achieved through the deployment of the most appropriate technology, according to the system in question. This article investigates relevant network selection approaches that have been adopted by widely accepted telecommunication standards and briefly presents recent research proposals of the literature. More specifically, the article introduces the decomposition of the network selection problem into four fundamental steps. For every step, the key elements are highlighted and the most common techniques are analyzed and discussed comparatively. View full abstract»

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  • Incremental Train Control System

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 50 - 55
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    In 1995, GE started development of the incremental train control system (ITCS) for Amtrak to use on its Michigan corridor between Detroit and Chicago. The primary objective for ITCS was to allow Amtrak passenger trains to operate at 110 mi/h intermixed with freight traffic. To achieve this objective, the traditional wayside signal system would be enhanced with a positive train control (PTC) system to enforce the wayside signal indications (train movement authorities) and operating speed limits. Additionally, the highway-rail grade crossings had to provide the required warning time for trains operating at higher speeds than for what the crossings had originally been designed (79 mi/h). ITCS in Michigan is a fail-safe (vital) positive train control system that overlays the existing signal system for improved safety and provides a cost-effective solution for high-speed train operation. ITCS meets the requirements for PTC, a train control system recently mandated by the U.S. federal government to prevent trainto-train collisions, over-speed derailments, incursions into roadway worker zones, and movement over a misaligned track switch. View full abstract»

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  • Highway Toll Enforcement

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 56 - 65
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    Highway toll control requires automated and real-time classification of fast-moving motor vehicles. In this article, we present a modular software solution to the technical problem of how to classify vehicles on a highway with a tollgate equipped with a laser scanner with an angular resolution of 1° and a frame rate of 75 Hz. At a typical cruising speed, a time window of less than 300 ms is available for scanning one vehicle. View full abstract»

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  • New IEEE Standards [Standards]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 66 - 69
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  • Around the IEEE-VTS

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 70 - 71
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  • Calendar of Events

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 72
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  • Joint Rail Conference - 2011

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 72
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  • [2010 Index]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1 - 6
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Vehicular Technology Magazine will seek to publish peer reviewed articles covering advances in areas of interest to the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society: The theoretical, experimental, application and operational aspects of electrical and electronic engineering relevant to motor vehicles and associated land transportation infrastructure.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Klaus David

University of Kassel

Kassel, Germany

david@uni-kassel.de

+49 561 804 6314