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Intelligent Transportation Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date Summer 2010

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Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): C1
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  • IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems Society

    Page(s): 2
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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  • What Will Bring Vehicular Communication into Passenger Cars? [Editor's Column]

    Page(s): 2 - 4
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  • IEEE Forum on Integrated and Sustainable Transportation Systems (FISTS)

    Page(s): 3
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  • IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems Magazine

    Page(s): 5
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  • Emergency Services in Future Intelligent Transportation Systems Based on Vehicular Communication Networks

    Page(s): 6 - 20
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2669 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Over the years, we have harnessed the power of computing to improve the speed of operations and increase in productivity. Also, we have witnessed the merging of computing and telecommunications. This excellent combination of two important fields has propelled our capability even further, allowing us to communicate anytime and anywhere, improving our work flow and increasing our quality of life tremendously. The next wave of evolution we foresee is the convergence of telecommunication, computing, wireless, and transportation technologies. Once this happens, our roads and highways will be both our communications and transportation platforms, which will completely revolutionize when and how we access services and entertainment, how we communicate, commute, navigate, etc., in the coming future. This paper presents an overview of the current state-of-the-art, discusses current projects, their goals, and finally highlights how emergency services and road safety will evolve with the blending of vehicular communication networks with road transportation. View full abstract»

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  • Negative Behavioral Adaptation to Lane-Keeping Assistance Systems

    Page(s): 21 - 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2502 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In addition to the improvement of driving comfort, modern advanced driver assistance systems also aim to substantially increase traffic safety. Meanwhile, initial optimism with respect to potential safety gains has given way to a more critical view. There is, for example, a danger that continued use is associated with drivers systematically adapting their behavior to the new systems in a negative manner. According to theoretical considerations, excessive trust in such systems may lead to the development of a tendency for the driver to delegate safety-relevant aspects of the driving task to the system, which, in cases where system limits are reached, can result in the driver and other road users being endangered. The present study examined this phenomenon in the context of lateral control assistance. In a field experiment, it was specifically investigated whether drivers who had become familiar with a heading control system developed excessive trust in the system and misjudged its limits. This question was addressed in a driving trial in which, unbeknown to the driver, the heading control system was repeatedly deactivated and the driver's behavior and lane control were observed. Analysis of subjective and objective data clearly demonstrated that drivers did not develop excessive trust in the system and accordingly regulated lateral control to a sufficient degree even after prolonged exposure to the system. Negative behavioral adaptation to the heading control system was thus not observed. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Intelligent Vehicles Symposium

    Page(s): 33
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  • IEEE Intelligent Vehicles Symposium, (IV11) [Society News]

    Page(s): 34
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  • IEEE Intelligent Vehicles Symposium, (IV10) [Society News]

    Page(s): 34 - 35
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  • IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA 2010) [Society News]

    Page(s): 36
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  • [Calendar]

    Page(s): 38
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems Magazine (ITSM) publishes peer-reviewed articles that provide innovative research ideas and application results, report significant application case studies, and raise awareness of pressing research and application challenges in all areas of intelligent transportation systems. 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief


Miguel Ángel Sotelo

Department of Computer Engineering

University of Alcalá