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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date Feb. 1993

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Comments on "Temporal logic-based deadlock analysis for Ada" by G.M. Karam and R.J.A. Burh

    Page(s): 198 - 199
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    The commenters discuss several flaws they found in the above-titled paper by G.M. Koran and R.J.A. Burh (see ibid., vol.17, no.10, p.109-1125, (1991)). The commenters argue that the characterization of operational and axiomatic proof method is modified and inaccurate; the classification of modeling techniques for concurrent systems confuses the distinction between state-based and event-based models with the essential distinction between explicit enumeration of behaviors and symbolic manipulation of properties; the statements about the limitations of linear-time temporal logic in relation to nondeterminism are inaccurate; and the characterization of the computational complexity of the analysis technique is overly optimistic.<> View full abstract»

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  • Correction to 'A practical view of software measurement and implementation experiences within Motorola'

    Page(s): 199 - 200
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    A corrected reference list for the above-titled paper (see ibid., vol.18, no.11, p.998-1010, (1992)) is presented.<> View full abstract»

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  • Multiprocessor scheduling of processes with release times, deadlines, precedence, and exclusion relations

    Page(s): 139 - 154
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    The author presents a scheduling algorithm that solves the problem of finding a feasible nonpreemptive schedule whenever one exists on M identical processors for a given set of processes such that each process starts executing after its release time and completes its computation before its deadline. A given set of precedence relations and a given set of exclusion relations defined on ordered pairs of process segments are satisfied. This algorithm can be applied to the important problem of automated pre-run-time scheduling of processes with arbitrary precedence and exclusion relations on multiprocessors in hard-real-time systems View full abstract»

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  • Performance comparison of three modern DBMS architectures

    Page(s): 120 - 138
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    The introduction of powerful workstations connected through local area networks (LANs) inspired new database management system (DBMS) architectures that offer high performance characteristics. The authors examine three such software architecture configurations: client-server (CS), the RAD-UNIFY type of DBMS (RU), and enhanced client-server (ECS). Their specific functional components and design rationales are discussed. Three simulation models are used to provide a performance comparison under different job workloads. Simulation results show that the RU almost always performs slightly better than the CS, especially under light workloads, and that ECS offers significant performance improvement over both CS and RU. Under reasonable update rates, the ECS over CS (or RU) performance ratio is almost proportional to the number of participating clients (for less than 32 clients). The authors also examine the impact of certain key parameters on the performance of the three architectures and show that ECS is more scalable that the other two View full abstract»

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  • Generalized stochastic Petri nets: a definition at the net level and its implications

    Page(s): 89 - 107
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    The class of Petri nets obtained by eliminating timing from generalized stochastic Petri net (GSPN) models while preserving the qualitative behavior is identified. Structural results for those nets are derived, obtaining the first structural analysis of Petri nets with priority and inhibitor arcs. A revision of the GSPN definition based on the structural properties of the models is presented. It is shown that for a (wide) class of nets, the definition of firing probabilities of conflicting immediate transitions does not require the information on reachable markings. Identification of the class of models for which the net-level specification is possible is also based on the structural analysis results. The procedure for the model specification is illustrated by means of an example. It is also shown that a net-level specification of the model associated with efficient structural analysis techniques can have a substantial impact on model analysis View full abstract»

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  • Rapid transaction-undo recovery using twin-page storage management

    Page(s): 155 - 164
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    A twin-page storage method, which is an alternative to the TWIST (twin slot) approach by A. Reuter (190) for rapid transaction-undo recovery is presented. In contrast to TWIST, the twin-page approach allows dirty pages in the buffer to be written at any instant onto a disk without the requirement of undo logging, and, when a transaction is aborted, no explicit undo is required. As a result, all locks accumulated by the aborted transaction can be released earlier, allowing other transactions waiting for the locks to proceed. Through maintenance of aborted transaction identifiers, invalid pages written by the aborted transaction coexist with other valid pages and are guaranteed not to be accessed by subsequent transactions. Instead of an explicit undo, most of the invalid pages are overwritten by subsequent normal updates. Performance in terms of disk I/O and CPU overhead for transaction-undo recovery is analyzed and compared with TWIST. It is shown that the presented method is particularly suited for applications where there are a large number of updates written onto disk when transactions are aborted, and there are frequent aborts View full abstract»

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  • Toward a rigorous interpretation of ESML-extended systems modeling language

    Page(s): 165 - 180
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    A graphics-based language known as ESML (extended systems modeling language), which is an extension of the data flow diagram notation for representing control logic in models of real-time systems, is analyzed and summarized to provide a rigorous interpretation of ESML symbols and their combinations. Based on elementary and compact (high-level) Petri nets (PNs), to which a succinct introduction is given, formal foundations for ESML, and in particular for its transformation schema (TS) notation, are proposed. Translation principles as well as examples of usual transformation and flow patterns are presented both in TS and PN notation. The resulting PN models are rigorous and accurate models of the dynamics of real-time systems with signals, prompts, and data flows of various kinds. Due to their formally defined token game they can be executed and used to study indeterminism and concurrency of events View full abstract»

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  • Resource allocation for primary-site fault-tolerant systems

    Page(s): 108 - 119
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    Resource allocation for a distributed system employing the primary site approach for fault tolerance is discussed. Two kinds of systems are considered. The first consists of fault-tolerant nodes where each node has many duplicated servers. One server is the primary, which serves user requests, and the rest are backup. The second does not have fault-tolerant nodes. To tolerate node failures, each node uses other nodes as backups. When a node fails, all requests initially allocated to the node are served by one of its backups. To study the resource allocation for such systems, an approximate model for each system is developed. Using these models, efficient allocation algorithms that take into account the failure/repair rates of the system and the fault-tolerant overheads are presented. Using experimental results, it is shown that the algorithms give the optimal or suboptimal allocations. The algorithms, which incur little overhead, can improve the system performance significantly over an intuitive allocation algorithm View full abstract»

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  • Deterministic model and transient analysis of virtual circuits

    Page(s): 187 - 197
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    A model for a virtual circuit in the form of a tandem of servers that process incoming packets using a FIFO (first-in, first-out) discipline is proposed. The service times are assumed to be known completely. These may differ from packet to packet and from server to server. The model permits a variety of buffer or transit time constraints to be incorporated into the model. Several results that help one to understand the transient behavior of a virtual circuit are presented. On the basis of these results, a number of schemes that may be used to determine the time when the next packet must be sent over the network are presented. Transit delay and throughput are used to evaluate a given schedule. Solutions are given for maximum throughput, minimum transit delay, and maximum throughput under transit delay constraints. It is expected that these results will have a substantial bearing on the study of congestion control policies in computer networks, particularly those based on predicting network behavior View full abstract»

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  • Trust requirements and performance of a fast subtransport-level protocol for secure communication

    Page(s): 181 - 186
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    A secure network protocol called the authenticated datagram protocol (ADP) that optimizes the performance of global networks by establishing host-to-host secure channels and building agent-to-agent channels on top of host-to-host channels is presented. The performance advantages of ADP come with an accompanying set of trust requirements that are stringent for a network spanning mutually distrustful organizations. The cause for this stringency is shown to be propagation of trust relationships in ADP. Methods of breaking their propagation and thereby accomplishing a significant reduction in ADP's trust requirements are presented. ADP, being a protocol for establishing host-to-host channels, can be handled at the subtransport level of the protocol hierarchy. A prototype of ADP implemented on Sun workstations connected by an Ethernet is described. Experimental measurements confirm that both the average latency of messages and the maximum throughput are substantially better than other secure protocols View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org