By Topic

Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date May 1993

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • A graduate course on finite element analysis for electromagnetic applications

    Page(s): 233 - 237
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (448 KB)  

    The author describes a graduate course on finite element analysis for electromagnetic applications that is offered at Marquette University. This course covers the theoretical background that is essential to learning how to model electromagnetic devices. The course stresses the practical aspects of applying the finite element method to engineering and design problems View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A unique instructional tool for visualizing equipotentials and its use in an introductory fields course

    Page(s): 237 - 240
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (352 KB)  

    Charge Master, an IBM PC-compatible software package that aids in visualizing equipotentials produced by systems of point charges, is described. It accomplishes this via an educational game and an option that plots equipotentials. An assignment designed to accompany the software and its use in an introductory EM fields course are also described. The software has been well received by students View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Teaching electric machinery and associated electromagnetic fields-a case for the benefits of academic computing

    Page(s): 240 - 249
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (808 KB)  

    Three broad categories of benefits resulting from use of and access to personal computers (PCs) and workstations (WSs) in teaching electric machines and drives, including all the electromagnetic field aspects associated with such electromechanical energy conversion devices are described. The first category concerns benefits from using computer graphics in computational electromagnetics. The second category involves quantification of electric machinery parameters and performance characteristics from computational electromagnetics. The third category concerns benefits from using computer simulation to study power-electronically-controlled electric drives, using time-domain models in which all significant effects of both time and space harmonics are retained. The material discussed is taught at Clarkson University at the senior undergraduate and first-year graduate levels View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The French experience in integrating the program FLUX2D in the undergraduate curriculum at the Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble

    Page(s): 272 - 279
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (720 KB)  

    The authors present their academic experience of teaching the application of finite element methods to electrical machines. This experience began many years ago when the Laboratoire d'Electrotechnique de Grenoble started a research program that led to the development of FLUX2D, a 2D finite element software package now commercially available. The teaching of theoretical and practical finite element methods with the use of FLUX2D is discussed View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Interactive display of vector fields inside waveguides

    Page(s): 283 - 286
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (316 KB)  

    The educational software package WGVMAP has been developed to enable students to plot interactively the electric and magnetic field lines of TE and TM propagating modes in cylindrical waveguides. The waveguide cross-sections considered are rectangular, circular, sectoral, and circular with a conducting baffle. The vector field display and generation of the field lines can be performed on a very modest configuration of an IBM PC or compatible computer, and plotted on an x-y plotter. Examples are presented to demonstrate the interactive procedure for generating the field lines View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Computational techniques in the first course on electromagnetism

    Page(s): 230 - 232
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (292 KB)  

    It is widely acknowledged that the introductory engineering electromagnetics (EM) course is in trouble because its concepts and techniques are novel and difficult, the time allowed is insufficient, and the range of topics is great and expanding. The introduction of computer-numerical solutions and the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches are discussed. It is suggested that the use of spreadsheet capabilities is pedagogically advantageous and time-effective for solving Laplace's equation problems by the method of finite differences View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The use of a spreadsheet for sinusoidal steady-state transmission line and optics problems

    Page(s): 269 - 272
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (380 KB)  

    It is shown how a spreadsheet on a personal computer can be used for sinusoidal steady-state transmission line and optics problems. It gives students the experience of programming the equations rather than relying on special-purpose software written by someone else. At the same time, the students do not need to expend too much effort on coding in a standard computer language, and the numerical effort is accomplished by the computer rather than a hand-held calculator View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Computational electromagnetics in education at the University of Bradford, England

    Page(s): 227 - 229
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (284 KB)  

    The incorporation of high-frequency computational electromagnetics into courses on antennas and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) is reviewed. The lecture material consists of an overview of the main techniques, plus a deeper treatment of the method of moments and the planar near-to-far-field transformation method. Class exercises using moment-method software are possible in the Master of Science course. For the lecturer, and for students with a deeper interest in the area, the greatest benefit is undoubtedly obtained from dissertation projects which permit an extended study of some problem. These are usually chosen to have some element of novelty, and hence frequently produce some useful research return View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Numerical approaches to teaching electromagnetics: a historical sketch and lessons from structural engineering

    Page(s): 265 - 269
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (544 KB)  

    The use of numerical techniques in teaching engineering electromagnetics appears to be the subject of intense debate, and efforts at modernizing the curriculum using computer methods are controversial because of the crowded nature of the curriculum. It is pointed out that civil and aerospace engineers have already experienced this controversy in the teaching of structural engineering. There, the mixture of explicit approaches and numerical approaches has reached a point of stability, and numerical techniques are routinely used in undergraduate education. The authors survey recent historical developments in the use of numerical methods in electromagnetics education and similar developments in the teaching of structural engineering, and draw, from the latter, lessons relevant to the teaching of electromagnetics View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Computing transients on transmission lines in teaching electromagnetics

    Page(s): 250 - 255
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (456 KB)  

    Two schemes for computing reflections and transients on transmission lines are presented. The first consists of a recursive algorithm and the second uses spreadsheets. These form suitable material for an undergraduate class and have the merit of exciting the interest of undergraduates by enhancing the role of computer-assisted instruction View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Teaching electromagnetism in terms of the potentials instead of the `Maxwell' equations

    Page(s): 223 - 226
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1304 KB)  

    A questionnaire circulated in Britain has documented the decreasing time spent there in teaching electromagnetic theory, and underlines the need for a reappraisal of what is taught. The advantages of a change of approach are argued. The field is defined by the electrical potential φ and magnetic vector A as computed in most numerical field software packages used as teaching aids, and E and B are viewed as no more than symbols denoting differentials. The energy and momentum are defined as properties of the charges, instead of the fields, and the usual Maxwell equations are not needed View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The teaching of numerical techniques in computational electromagnetics

    Page(s): 261 - 265
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (456 KB)  

    The authors' teaching experiences with numerical techniques in computational electromagnetics are described. Course descriptions and objectives are discussed, as well as their relationship to engineering practice View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A new approach to using simulation software in the electromagnetics curriculum

    Page(s): 219 - 222
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (404 KB)  

    A possible electromagnetics curriculum using the latest computer-based electromagnetic simulation tools is discussed. The design of the teaching program is justified by the results of earlier course designs based on previous versions of simulation tools. The response from students to the use of simulation techniques in the learning process is deemed positive enough to consider a major reorientation in the way in which the subject of electromagnetic fields is taught View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • QSTRIPS-a charge simulation program to enhance EM instruction

    Page(s): 255 - 261
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (680 KB)  

    A description is given of a charge simulation computer routine, QSTRIPS, written by the authors to enhance elementary electromagnetics instruction by providing a readily available graphics-oriented capability to permit students to learn by self-discovery. QSTRIPS gives students the freedom to model, solve, and produce parameter and graphical data for two-dimensional personalized electromagnetic structures of their own specification, structures that are not usually amenable to normal analytical solution methods. QSTRIPS models two-dimensional electrostatic systems by long narrow strips of flat-topped charge pulses placed contiguously around the surface of the system's structures. Strips of known charge and unknown voltage and of known voltage and unknown charge as well as strips defining dielectric and permanently polarized structures can be specified for the same system. A matrix equation is set up and solved for any unknown charges on these strips. Several examples including the hot cap trough problem are considered View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Introducing real world design problems into the undergraduate electromagnetic curriculum

    Page(s): 279 - 283
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (488 KB)  

    General-purpose CAD (computer-aided design) programs have been used to teach electromagnetics to undergraduates at Carnegie Mellon University. The focus of the instruction is the use of real-world design problems to teach basic electromagnetics concepts. Students use computers to set up and solve a variety of electrostatics, magnetostatics, eddy current, and microwave problems. This gives them the opportunity to visualize EM fields and to interact with real-world devices and issues. Experience shows that solving such problems by means of electromagnetic CAD tools boosts student motivation and leads to a better grasp of key technical concepts View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University