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Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 5 • Date Oct. 2010

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): C1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity publication information

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): C2
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2285
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  • Water-Vapor-Controlled Reaction for Fabrication of YBCO Films by Fluorine-Free Sol-Gel Process

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2286 - 2293
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (788 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Fluorine-free sol-gel process is a potential technique in preparing YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) films due to avoiding the release of HF gas. In this paper, yttrium acetate, barium acetate, and copper acetate are used as the starting materials to synthesize a novel YBCO fluorine-free precursor solution. The phase evolution during the heat-treatment process of YBCO films and YBCO phase formation were studied, and the results show that the introduction of water vapor at the stage of high-temperature heat treatment can make the BaCO3 phase become converted into the Ba(OH)2 phase, which can be used as the barium source to react with CuO and Y2O3 to generate the YBCO phase, thus achieving the purpose for fabrication of high-performance YBCO films by fluorine-free sol-gel process. Through this approach, YBCO films with c-axis orientation and an excellent superconducting property can be obtained on a (001)-oriented LaAlO3 (LAO) substrate. Superconducting property tests indicate that the superconducting critical transition temperature Tc is approximately 90 K, and the transition width T deduced from the R-T curve is less than 1 K; the critical current density Jc is 1.65 MA/cm2 (77 K, 0 T), as tested by an electric transport method, and 1.83 MA/cm2 (77 K, 0 T), as measured by magnetization measurement. View full abstract»

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  • Critical Current and AC Loss of DI-BSCCO Tape Modified by the Deposition of Ferromagnetic Layer on Edges

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2294 - 2300
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (910 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Modification of local magnetic field with the help of a ferromagnetic layer could be utilized to improve the performance of multifilamentary Bi-2223/Ag tapes. We investigated the case of the horseshoe-shaped cover on the tape edges, characterized by layer thickness and total length. Numerical simulations have been carried out to find the critical currents of tapes with different covers. According to the indications obtained from these calculations, samples with covered edges have been prepared with the primary aim of increasing the self-field critical current. We observed up to 7% enhancement of this quantity. AC loss was also investigated theoretically and experimentally in a case of applied ac transport current or ac magnetic field applied perpendicular to the tape wide surface. Reduction of both the transport loss and the magnetization loss has been observed. Good agreement is obtained between the experimental data and the calculations. View full abstract»

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  • Three-Dimensional Pareto-Optimal Design of Inductive Superconducting Fault Current Limiters

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2301 - 2311
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1113 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The inductive-type superconducting fault current limiters (LSFCLs) mainly consist of a primary copper coil, a secondary complete or partial superconductor cylinder, and a closed or open magnetic iron core. Satisfactory performance of such device significantly depends on optimal selection of its employed materials and construction dimensions, as well as its electrical, thermal, and magnetic parameters. Therefore, it is very important to identify a comprehensive model describing the LSFCL behavior in a power system prior to its fabrication. When a fault occurs, the dynamic model should essentially characterize the overall phenomena to compare the simulation results by varying LSFCL parameters to maximize the merits of a fault current limiter while minimizing its drawbacks during the normal state. The principle object of this paper is to achieve a feasible and full penetrative approach in 3-D alignments, i.e., a Pareto-optimal design of LSFCLs by means of multicriteria decision-making techniques after defining the LSFCL model in a power system CAD/electromagnetic transients including dc environment. View full abstract»

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  • Measurement System in Large-Scale Superconducting Magnet Performance Test

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2312 - 2316
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (415 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A cryogenic test facility for a superconducting magnet has been constructed at the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science. A measurement system was set up to obtain quench signals and parameters in the test program, such as cryogenic hydraulic performances and electromagnetic characteristics. Thirty superconducting magnets in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device and a number of other magnets have been tested in the test system successfully. The design of the measurement system is introduced from the point of view of engineering practice. The measurement method of some parameters is also discussed in detail. The highlight lies in type selection installation techniques and instrumentation of sensors. View full abstract»

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  • A Small High-Temperature Superconducting Maglev Propeller System Model

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2317 - 2321
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (228 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A small high-temperature superconducting maglev propeller system model has been designed and constructed. It mainly consists of a permanent-magnet track, a superconducting maglev vehicle, two linear motors, an automatic controlling electric circuit, and a spring. The linear motors can be powered by a single- or three-phase power supply. It can be used to do many experiments in different fields of science and technology for polytechnic instruction. Some experiments such as the effect of capacitive load in the electrocircuit, the voltage of the power supply, and the initial moving speed of the maglev model on the total mechanical work of the vehicle, which is done by the linear motors in single-phase power supply, have been carried out. Results will be discussed in detail. View full abstract»

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  • Numerical Demonstration of Relaxation Oscillation in a Resistive Superconducting Quantum Interference Device With Two Nonhysteretic Josephson Junctions

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2322 - 2326
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (618 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The author numerically demonstrates that a resistive superconducting quantum interference device (RSQUID) with two nonhysteretic Josephson junctions works as a relaxation oscillator. Sequential switching of the Josephson junctions transfers positive and negative flux quanta in the RSQUID loop one by one. Differently from a conventional two-junction superconducting quantum interference device, the dissipative RSQUID loop does not maintain the quantized flux, and hence, finite flux can be accumulated in the RSQUID loop during sequential switching of the Josephson junctions. When the accumulated flux reaches a critical value, the corresponding loop current prevents subsequent junction switching. That is, the oscillation stops. After the loop current decays, sequential switching of the junctions resumes. In addition to the waveforms of relaxation oscillation, dependence of relaxation oscillation on device parameters is presented. View full abstract»

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  • An Experimental Study of the Ferromagnetic Loss in 2G YBCO Tapes

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2327 - 2330
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (387 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Most second-generation high-temperature superconductor tapes are prepared on ferromagnetic substrates. It is known that the presence of this substrate increases the tape's ac losses. Thus, it is important to determine the contribution of the ferromagnetic loss to adequately evaluate the ac loss and achieve good designs of superconducting power devices based on YBCO-coated conductors. We here describe the design and testing of an experimental method to determine the ferromagnetic loss in the substrate. The setup consists of two coils wound around a core made of a YBCO tape. One of the coils is a feed coil used to create an alternating magnetic field in the core. The other is a pickup coil used to measure the electromotive force (emf) due to the magnetic field. The core consists of three turns of RABiTS-processed YBCO-coated conductor with nickel alloy substrate and stainless steel stabilization. The values of B and H to obtain the hysteresis cycle were obtained as follows: H was obtained from the current in the feed coil, and B was obtained by integration of the emf measured in the pickup coil. The ferromagnetic loss was measured with different currents, as well as frequencies in the range of 50-100 Hz. View full abstract»

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  • Development of a Multicoil Medium-Sized Superconducting Magnet With Zero-Vapor LHe

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2331 - 2335
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (493 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A medium-sized superconducting magnet wound using NbTi wires was designed, fabricated, and tested. It has been developed for a superconducting magnetic energy storage system. The solenoid magnet has a clear bore of 250 mm, an outer diameter of 380 mm, and a height of 589 mm. The magnet consists of one main coil and two compensating coils and is dry wound using rectangular superconducting wires with dimensions of 1.28 mm × 0.83 mm. Grooves and reinforced bulks are designed on the supporting structure to improve the cooling ability and the mechanical strength. A cryogenic system has been designed to keep the liquid helium in the zero evaporation state. The magnet has been tested in a compact cryostat, and it generates a central magnetic field of 4 T at the designed operating current of 126 A. The results of the experiment show that the performance of the magnet reaches the requirements. The details of the design, fabrication, and test of the superconducting magnet are presented in this paper. View full abstract»

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  • Performance of the Thin Superconducting Solenoid of the CMD-3 Detector

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2336 - 2340
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (339 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A thin superconducting solenoid is designed to provide a magnetic field of 1.5 T in the CMD-3 detector. The solenoid and an LXe calorimeter are placed in the common vacuum vessel of the detector. The solenoid is passively protected by subdivision and inductive coupling methods. The radiation thickness of the coil is 0.085X0, and the achieved E/M ratio is 6.9 kJ/kg. In 2007, the solenoid was tested in a prototype iron yoke, where the operational parameters were achieved. This paper reports the performance of the solenoid in the CMD-3 detector. The solenoid has been operated safely at a 1.35-T magnetic field. There were 19 quenches caused by various factors at magnetic fields in the range of 0.6-1.38 T. After a quench, the solenoid absorbed about 40% of the stored energy and warmed up to 42-55 K. A significant influence of quench-induced eddy currents on the detector design elements was observed. Liquid helium consumption at steady operation was about 3.5 L/h. Possible application of the achieved results to designing thinner solenoids is discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Characterizations of A15 Phase Composition and T_{c} for Internal-Sn \hbox {Nb}_{3}\hbox {Sn} Strands

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2341 - 2346
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (693 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Four sets of monoelementary (ME) and two kinds of multifilamentary (MF) internal-Sn Nb3Sn superconducting strands were designed and fabricated, in which various component ratios, different composite configurations, and some third-element additions were arranged. All strands were submitted to a first heat treatment (HT) of 210 °C/50 h + 340 °C/25 h for Cu-Sn mixing, followed by the A15 phase formation HT. The four ME strands were reacted at 675 °C, 700 °C, and 725 °C for 100 and 200 h, respectively, and the two MF strands at 650 °C, 675 °C, 700 °C, and 725 °C for 128 and 200 h, respectively. The analysis of the reacted strands comprised the A15 phase composition distribution by means of X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy and the critical temperature Tc by means of superconducting quantum interference device magnetization measurements. The obtained results indicate that, for sufficiently reacted internal-Sn Nb3Sn strands, the final A15 phase composition and Tc are determined by the diffusion and solid reaction mechanism of the A15 phase formation. In particular, the onset Tc values and the average Sn content in a grain do not depend on the reaction temperature, the local compositions in the strand, the composite configuration arrangement, and the third-element addition. View full abstract»

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    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2347
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    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2348
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  • IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity upcoming special conference issues

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): C3
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  • IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity Information for authors

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): C4
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity contains articles on the applications of superconductivity and other relevant technology.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Britton L. T. Plourde
Syracuse University
bplourde@syr.edu
http://www.phy.syr.edu/~bplourde