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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date May 1986

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Education Society

    Page(s): nil1
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  • [Breaker page]

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  • Guest Editorials

    Page(s): 49 - 50
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  • The NSF Role in Fostering University-Industry Research Relationships

    Page(s): 51 - 57
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    This paper notes the current boom in university-industry research relationships and describes the theory underlying Federal government participation in the phenomenon. The National Science Foundation's array of programs to foster university-industry collaboration in research and education is described. The paper concludes that the forces driving increased university-industry interaction will continue to operate over the coming decade. View full abstract»

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  • An Industry Group Takes the Initiative

    Page(s): 58 - 60
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    The American Electronics Association (AEA), with 2700 electronics and information technology member companies, is the largest national trade association for the electronics industries. AEA initiated a formal engineering and technical education program in 1981 which seeks to increase the quality and quantity of electrical engineering and computer science/engineering graduates in the U.S. It seeks remedies primarily by focusing on the shortage of engineering and computer science faculty which is restricting undergraduate enrollments and decreasing educational quality. AEA's Board of Directors set a goal for each of its member companies to ``invest'' 2 percent of R&D expenditures in engineering education. It recommends that much of industry's assistance be in the form of faculty development grants, graduate student fellowship-loans, and equipment in the electrical and computer engineering and computer science areas. View full abstract»

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  • The Semiconductor Research Corporation and University Research in Integrated Circuits

    Page(s): 61 - 68
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    The Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) was formed in 1982 as a cooperative for implementation of research activities that respond to the generic needs of the integrated circuit industry. It has established a research program through contracts with universities that encompasses the spectrum of technologies that are relevant to integrated circuits. View full abstract»

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  • IBM and U.S. Universities???An Evolving Partnership

    Page(s): 69 - 77
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    Both universities and industry have much to gain from closer relationships based on their natural interdependence. IBM's direct support for U.S. higher education includes, for example, investments in younger faculty and graduate students, in leading academic departments, and in selected initiatives to respond to critical needs to strengthen American education and research in science and engineering. Many of the company's most important relationships with, and support for, universities, however, arise through collaborative research activities on specific problems of common interest. So long as academic freedom and goals are respected, collaborative research is an especially promising area which can bring industry's technical and applications strength into academia, and the creativity of the university environment into industry. View full abstract»

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  • Perspectives on a New Paradigm for Cooperative Research

    Page(s): 78 - 84
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    New partnership paradigms are appearing today as American industry seeks new ways to meet international competition. This challenge is a primary national need. Industrial cooperation with universities, government, and companies is being promoted to identify, develop, and apply technologies to new products in a more timely and effective manner. This paper gives one company's perspectives on improving cooperation to leverage resources and improve our national position in the global technology competition. To provide a perspective, the history of support of engineering and science research by the Federal government and by industry is reviewed. Several models of cooperation between universities, industry, and government are cited, noting trends and areas open for innovation. A suggested new paradigm for cooperation is described. Example cooperative projects of Control Data are identified. An implementation by Control Data of the new paradigm, the Engineering Center Network, is described in some detail. View full abstract»

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  • A Semicustom VLSI System Design Course Supported by the General Electric Microelectronics Center

    Page(s): 85 - 89
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    This paper presents an approach to VLSI system design and fabrication using gate arrays which has been implemented at the University of Virginia in conjunction with the General Electric Microelectronics Center (GE-MEC). Material initially developed by GE-MEC was modified and incorporated into a new graduate course to supplement that which already existed in the area of VLSI system design. A software tool set which includes functional and fault simulators for the TEGASTM1 hardware description language, a testability analyzer, and packages for cell placement, channel routing, and system delay extraction was used for chip design. Chip fabrication of successful design projects is the responsibility of GE-MEC. View full abstract»

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  • The Role of Industry Advisory Councils???The A.S.U. Model

    Page(s): 90 - 92
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    Healthy interaction between industry and university, for the well-being of both, vital to the strength of our nation's economy, can be fostered by the use of industry advisory councils. A successful model exists at Arizona State University, where, from 1979 to 1984, the Advisory Council for Engineering has helped attract over $ 50 million of new resources. The planning and political efforts of the group used to accomplish this goal are described. A second five-year plan, calling for an investment of $62.5 million, has been initiated. View full abstract»

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  • Industry/University Cooperative Program in Microelectronics Instruction and Research

    Page(s): 93 - 99
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    A cooperative program in microelectronics instruction and research between the RCA Solid State Division and the Department of Engineering at Wilkes College is described. This program has led to the implementation of a comprehensive, hands-on, laboratory oriented microelectronics fabrication course offered by the college at the undergraduate level and has fostered joint research/development projects between the industry and college. The details of this cooperative program are discussed and the results of these efforts described. View full abstract»

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  • The NASA Space Shuttle???A Vehicle for University/ Industry Educational Interaction

    Page(s): 100 - 104
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    In December of 1982 Worcester Polytechnic Institute, with the cooperation and support of the MITRE Corporation, initiated a program to propose, select, design, and develop experiments to be flown onboard a NASA Space Shuttle. The educational objectives of this program, based on the experiences of the students, and the cooperative objectives based on the experiences of the faculty and staff of the two institutions, are presented. All of the proposed experiments are being developed by undergraduates with the advisorship of WPI faculty. MITRE engineers and scientists are supporting the projects through detailed development advice, design reviews, and program management advice. Overall, the program will require four years of effort, involving between 30 and 50 students and approximately a dozen WPI faculty and MITRE professional staff each year. The administrative structure designed to coordinate this program, the logistics of interactions between WPI, MITRE, and NASA, and the program schedule are presented in detail. View full abstract»

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  • Toward University-Industry Collaboration in Central New York

    Page(s): 105 - 110
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    The establishment of new collaborative relationships between universities and industry, specifically the recent creation of centers for collaborative research at universities, is motivated by changes in federal policy for research funding. The Center for Advanced Technology in Computer Applications and Software Engineering (CASE Center) at Syracuse University was established under a new New York State program that reflects those changes. The Center is a consortium of 16 academic institutions in central New York pursuing complementary goals in research, education, and regional economic development. This paper describes the CASE Center and its interaction with industry, government, and universities. View full abstract»

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  • An Innovative Program of University/Industry Cooperation in Microprocessor Education

    Page(s): 111 - 114
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    The need for a university to provide high quality microprocessor education to a constituency consisting of undergraduate and graduate students, university faculty and staff, and engineers in industry requires substantial resources in the form of state-of-the-art equipment and experienced instructors. This paper describes a unique, ongoing, joint effort between the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stony Brook and Intel Corporation that has allowed both Stony Brook and Intel to accomplish their goals in the area of microprocessor education. View full abstract»

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  • Industry-University Cooperation with Emphasis on a Machines and Drives Laboratory

    Page(s): 115 - 119
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    Joint efforts between the University of Missouri and industry have matured significantly over the past years. While all four campuses have benefited from this increased cooperation, major improvements in both the research and teaching programs of the Department of Electrical Engineering at U.M.-Rolla have resulted. We first examine the general impact of this change from a campus and departmental funding point of view. This is followed by a discussion of the Machines and Drives Laboratory, a major laboratory facility supporting both the teaching and research programs of the department. This particular laboratory is an excellent example of university-industry cooperation. View full abstract»

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  • A Knowledge-Based Expert System for Student Advising

    Page(s): 120 - 124
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    The Academic Planning Environment (APE) expert system project is a knowledge-based system for the advising and assistance of university students in the planning of their studies towards an academic degree. This system has been implemented for and tested at the Bar Ilan University. It has the capability of planning a program of courses which meets the student's remaining degree requirements and is sensitive to his preferences and strengths. It is able to give correct advice on prerequisites, exemptions, and the like. The system will interactively suggest alternatives, verify and accept the student's requests, and schedule the desired courses. View full abstract»

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  • Industry's Contributions to a Quality Engineering Education

    Page(s): 125 - 128
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    A role for industry in maintaining and ensuring a continuous supply of capable engineers from universities is defined. Aside from the usual cash and equipment donations, industry can also be actively involved in curriculum development, student design projects, and faculty research. Not only can such interactions strengthen the ties between the two institutions, but more importantly, through these interactions the university can gain a better appreciation of the expectations placed upon the graduates and better prepare them for the productive periods of their lives. View full abstract»

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  • Information for authors

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Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University