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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Aug. 1987

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Education Society

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  • [Breaker page]

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  • The Ecole superieure de Telegraphie and the Beginnings of French Electrcal Engineerng Education

    Page(s): 121 - 129
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    Organized in 1878, the Ecole sup??rieure de T??l??graphie (EST) became the first school in France to offer a program in electrical engineering. Although the founding of later French electrical engineering schools involved local governments, private enterprise, the universities, and even the French electrical engineering society, the EST was established by the state specifically for telegraph instruction. This paper examines the establishment of the EST as an extension of the French tradition of state engineering schools and notes the work of Georg Ohm, Gustave Kirchhoff, and Pierre Curie. View full abstract»

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  • Spreadsheet Solution of Partial Differential Equations

    Page(s): 130 - 134
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    This paper points out that a spreadsheet program on a home or personal computer permits the solution of partial differential equations in two independent variables with considerably less effort than conventional programming languages. The computational molecule approach is identified as a natural approach for using spreadsheets to solve elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations in rectangular, skew, and curvilinear coordinate systems. The technique is relatively independent of the type of spreadsheet or host computer employed, although the spreadsheet must allow forward or circular references for iteration. Each of the examples in the paper was run on a home computer with 48K RAM. View full abstract»

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  • A Microprogrammed Computer Simulator

    Page(s): 135 - 141
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    A software educational tool (ET) has been developed that enables students of computer architecture to simulate a wide variety of computers on a fixed microprogram-organized-hardware (MOH). The user defines a computer by using ET to enter the appropriate microprogram. Machine language programs (macroprograms) may then be entered and a simulation made of their execution on the computer defined by the microprogram. While the simulated run is occurring, the state of the underlying machine may be observed at any point of execution. A microstep/graphics run mode may also be used to present a color display of the data path section of the MOH after each microinstruction is executed. In this paper, the ET simulation program, the MOH machine, and a simple example of how ET is used are presented. View full abstract»

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  • A Complete Object Recognition System as a Computer Vision Course Project

    Page(s): 142 - 150
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    This paper describes a rather simple but complete object recognition system that was implemented in one semester as a class project in our course in computer vision. The system accepts video images of three-dimensional objects composed of configurations of toy blocks and delivers a one-word classification (e.g., ``arch'') of the scene. The strategy employed is one of identifying individual blocks, establishing spatial relationships between the blocks, and establishing instances of one block supporting another. The constraints of gravity are thus incorporated into the recognition process. It is designed so that any one student can elect to build one of three modules that comprise the system; the system can thus be implemented by three students in one semester. The modules span the complete range of problems encountered in any machine vision system???from image acquisition to high-level model matching. The entire project can be implemented with readily available hardware. View full abstract»

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  • Educational Aspects of Simple Inexpensive Personal Computers in Linear System Analysis

    Page(s): 151 - 156
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    In order to introduce sophomore engineering students to the scientific applications of personal computers, we have used a simple computer algorithm for analyzing linear systems. This algorithm, mathematically equivalent to Euler's method, is derived from the analog computer block diagram with which most students are either already familiar or the principles of which they can grasp very quickly. We have found the method to be of significant pedagogical value in developing a feel for the use and limitations of numerical metbods, and indeed, for the intrinsic opeation of computers as such. It also demonstrates dramatically the educational impact of small, pesonal computers (with a price comparable to that of a textbook) when their simulation capabilities are used in combination with even the lowest resolution graphics. View full abstract»

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  • A Methodology for Automatic Presentation of Exercise Problems Based on Related Text-Constructing Units

    Page(s): 157 - 163
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    This paper introduces a methodology for the automatic presentation of exercise problems. The autoselection of appropriate exercise problems is based on two factors: 1) the relationship between the exercise problems and the units constituting the paragraphs and chapters of a study text, and 2) the intellectual condition of the student. This method is very useful for the evaluation of the amount of study performed by students. The computer-aided instruction (CAI) system based on this method will complement the normal lectures and will be very effective for students who want to acquire a deeper understanding of the subject matter. View full abstract»

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  • A Firmware Voltage Controller for a Robotic Arm

    Page(s): 164 - 173
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    Educational table-top robotic arms are used for robotics instruction at many colleges and universities. One of the most popular educational robots is the Rhino XR-2, a five-axis articulated coordinate robotic manipulator which features closed-loop feedback control with dc servomotors and optical encoders. This paper describes some enhancements to the XR-2 controller, including a global form of speed control that is obtained through pulse-width modulation of the applied motor voltage. No changes to the original controller hardware are needed to implement the new features. Instead, the expanded command set is added by simply replacing the Intel 8748 controller chip with one containing new firmware. View full abstract»

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  • A Contemporary Design for a Computing Science Academic Computing Facility: The Simon Fraser University Experiene

    Page(s): 174 - 185
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    The design of a Computing Science Academic Computing Facility (CSACF) which accommodates research, instruction, and administration by the Simon Fraser University School of Computing Science is described. The facility is designed to meet the hardware and software requirements of graduate and undergraduate instruction in fundamental and applied computing science, and to meet the requirements of research into instructional technology and methodology. The facility design takes advantage of the decreasing price of microcomputer system hardware and software to replace nearly obsolete mainframe instructional computing equipment previously in use with computing equipment which is rapidly becoming standard in computing research and application. We believe that our computing facility concept is state of the art, modular, and cost-effective, and should prove to be of significant value to a wide variety of disparate computing science departments. View full abstract»

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  • An Educational System for the Study of Tasking in Ada

    Page(s): 185 - 191
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    This paper describes an ``educational Ada1 tasking subsystem.'' It features an interpreter running Ada tasking programs and automatically giving information about each significant event occurring within tasks. These traces can also be given to a postprocessor which prints a schematic overview of the overall activity of the tasks and gives a separate listing of the activity of each task. In this way, students can see all the activity going on within and between the tasks. It is thus very useful for teaching concurrent programming which is usually quite hard to grasp because of the lack of adequate tracing tools. View full abstract»

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  • Microwave Laboratory Experiments Using Computer-Aided Test

    Page(s): 191 - 194
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    Computer-aided testing can increase the efficiency and accuracy of university laboratory experiments, while also increasing student interest. Examples of computer-aided RF and microwave experiments being used in the Electronics Engineering Technology Program at Brigham Young University are given. The experiments use interactive programming in a scaled down, semi-automated method designed to minimize cost and complexity, while keeping the student involved. Examples include experiments in microwave radiation and propagation, microwave antenna characteristics, and solid-state microwave oscillator characteristics. A student antenna test exercise using computer automated testing is also described. Abbreviated examples of software used in automating the experiments are given. View full abstract»

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  • A Course in Microprocessors Based on the 16/32 Bit 68000 ??P

    Page(s): 194 - 197
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    A junior year, second semester course in microprocessors (??P) was developed in the Computer Engineering Area at Roger Williams College in the Spring, 1984. A hands-on approach was emphasized, and many experiments were performed in conjunction with the popular Motorola Educational Computer Board (ECB) with a 68090 ??P to provide the students experiences in software and hardware interfacing. A final project required design, testing, and presentation by students in groups of three. The purpose of this paper is to give a detailed description of the experiments and the equipment used which can provide a guide for a second-level course in ??P. View full abstract»

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  • Call for Papers Special Issue of IEEE Transactions on Education On Circuits and Systems: Research and Education

    Page(s): 198
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  • IEEE copyright form

    Page(s): 199
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  • Now is the best time to join our society

    Page(s): 200
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  • Information for authors

    Page(s): nil2
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Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University