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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date May 1987

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Education Society

    Page(s): nil1
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  • [Breaker page]

    Page(s): nil1
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  • Testing Engineerng Students: Are We Really Fair?

    Page(s): 65 - 70
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    Since its publication by the Educational Testing Service in 1962, the MBTI (Myers-Briggs-Type Indicator) has seen application in a variety of settings. Its usefulness to the classroom teacher, however, is unclear at this time. This investigation addressed the relationship of two dimensions of that instrument, Sensing-Intuiting (S-N) and Judging-Perceiving (J-P), to performance on tests containing both computational problems and multiple choice questions. The objective of the investigation was to determine whether particular types of testing offer an advantage to certain individuals due to their preferred ways of internalizing and processing information. Tests in a sophomore-level strength of materials course were constructed to contain several computational problems and 10 multiple choice questions each. Questions were designed to operate at one of three levels of the problem-solving taxonomy: diagnosis, routines or interpretation. The performances of both S-N students and J-P students were compared on both problems and multiple choice questions within each test and on the departmental final examination. No differences due to the J-P dimension were detected. The S-N dimension, however, yielded several significant differences. N-type students performed substantially better on multiple choice questions on two of the three examinations given and better on computational problems on one of the three examinations. As expected, they excelled on those questions which tested at the ``interpretation'' level. No differences were seen on questions requiring diagnosis or routines. In all cases, even when differences did not achieve significance, there was a trend favoring the N-type student. View full abstract»

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  • A Novel Approach to Transients in Transmission Lines

    Page(s): 71 - 76
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    Transient traveling waves in transmission lines can be analyzed by means of bounce diagrams. However, the procedures in deriving the transient responses are often mechanical and provide little physical insight to the solutions of wave equations. In this paper, the incident and reflected waves are described in terms of voltages and currents observed by moving observers. Using the results derived, we present a more logical procedure for the graphical analysis of transient waves using bounce diagrams. The method is general and can be extended to nonuniform transmission lines driven by arbitrary time-varying sources. The relation between voltage and current responses can be represented by means of trajectories in the V-I plane. These trajectories can be logically derived from the transient responses given in the x-t domain. View full abstract»

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  • A Heuristic Approach to Fiber Optics

    Page(s): 77 - 82
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    By employing simple heuristic arguments based on the ray model of light it is possible to gain significant physical insight into light propagation mechanisms of optical fibers. Specifically, the optical fiber can be treated as an idealized waveguide in order to obtain qualitatively correct dependence of the mode density and power transmission characteristics on the V parameter of the optical fiber. In addition, the ray trajectories for optical fiber modes can be compared through a simple correspondence which links the del operator to the ray propagation vector. View full abstract»

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  • Comparative Characteristic Analyses of On-Campus Resident and Off-Campus Video-Based Engineering Graduate Students and Their Implications

    Page(s): 83 - 89
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    With research now fully supporting the ability of video to disseminate off-campus graduate engineering education, it is useful to review other factors impacting on program quality. One key issue is the quality of off-campus students, particularly in comparison to their on-campus peers. The following compares on-and off-campus engineering graduate students for traditionally accepted quantitative characteristics. These include: chronological age, age of undergraduate degree, scores on the GRE Verbal, Quantitative, and Analytic test, and undergraudate quality point average. View full abstract»

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  • Derivation of Induction Motor Equivalent Circuit Using Space-Phasor Concepts

    Page(s): 90 - 97
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    The elements of space-phasor theory are discussed with application to the induction machine. The familiar derivation of resultant MMF for a three-phase winding is extended to give a definition of the current space-phasor. The ideas of space-phasor theory are used to derive the steady-state equivalent circuit for the induction machine. The properties of the space-phasor are used with alternate reference frames to justify the substitution of a line frequency rotor representation for the actual rotor having slip-frequency currents. The spacephasor method is thus shown to offer useful opportunities in the teaching ing of electrical machines. This paper is confined to steady-state analysis, but the method is also in use for the transient analysis of machines. By the use of this method, students may be given a single starting point for all aspects of machine analysis. View full abstract»

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  • A Revised Undergraduate Course on Television Engineering

    Page(s): 98 - 99
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    The paper gives the course content and a brief overview of a revised undergraduate course on television engineering in the undergraduate curriculum of electrical engineering. View full abstract»

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  • Simple Computer Network Analysis

    Page(s): 99 - 102
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    A simple method of numerically evaluating network functions by computer is presented. The method is based on, and reinforces, fundamental concepts encountered in introductory network theory courses and is readily grasped by students. Basic language code is given for three subroutines which numerically perform Thevenin, series to parallel and parallel to series transformations. View full abstract»

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  • Digital System Design: State Machine Versus Microprocessor Controller

    Page(s): 102 - 106
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    This paper considers the use of a microprocessor as a controller for digital systems. It is suggested that the microprocessor controller can be considered as a state machine with each state being defined in terms of possible machine instructions. The strengths and weaknesses of this device are discussed. A design procedure is proposed that allows comparison of a conventional state machine design to microprocessor design of a digital system that contains a sequential controller. View full abstract»

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  • The Mechanics of Implementing a Consistent Instructional Feedback Model in the Development of a Computer-Based Engineering Course

    Page(s): 106 - 109
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    A computer-based education course to teach an undergraduate engineering course in statics has been developed at Texas A&M University. In the initial design phase, the authors used a very simply constructed feedback model. However, once development was underway, this model proved inadequate for dealing with a variety of feedback problems. These problems included the need to have certain exceptions to the general rules of the model, inconsistencies in application of the feedback model by the various authors and programers, and difficulties in discussing the various feedback issues due the emergence of a variety of loosely defined terminologies. As a result, a very detailed and precise implementation model was developed. The strategy for this model is displayed in flowcharts which show the relationship between the student's answer and the system's instructional feedback for each of three distinct question types. From these flowcharts, course developers designed feedback forms which made the writing and coding of feedback more efficient. View full abstract»

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  • A Command Language for Multiple Robot Arm Coordination

    Page(s): 109 - 112
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    A high-level robot command language has been developed as an extension to the C programming language and the UNIXTM operating system. It provides a common interface for programming three robot arms made by two different manufacturers and sharing a common work space. This command language allows task description in Cartesian coordinates and it makes concurrency of the movements of the arms transparent to the user. Simultaneous movement of the three arms is obtained by creating different background processes running in parallel under the UNIX system. Synchronization commands are included in the language to allow coordination of the movements of all three arms. The language can be used either in a compiled mode where a task can be described by a sequence of commands, or in an interpreted mode with each command executed immediately. It is convenient to use for both teaching and research, and it can be easily integrated with a vision system. It is also easily transferable to other Unix systems and it can be expanded to include other robot arms. View full abstract»

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  • A Simulation Queueing Model for a Higher Education System: Results and Analysis

    Page(s): 112 - 115
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    This study involved results and analysis from a simulation queueing model applicable to the higher education system in Egypt [11] and hopefully, elsewhere. Costs involved in enlarging the higher education system are also considered. A computer program was developed to perform the necessary calculations both for the simulation device and for the solution of the simulation of the mathematical model. View full abstract»

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  • Hybrid Representation of Coupled Coils

    Page(s): 115 - 116
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    A hybrid model for coupled coils is presented. It is applicable to all cases including the extreme case of ideal transformers. The need to treat the ideal transformer as a distinct circuit element is dispensed with. View full abstract»

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  • A Note on the Torque on a Current Loop of Arbitrary Shape Placed in a Uniform Magnetic Field

    Page(s): 117 - 118
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    A simple derivation is given for the torque on a current loop of arbitrary shape, not necessarily planar, when it is placed in a uniform magnetic field. View full abstract»

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  • Call for Papers - Joint Special Issue of IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems and IEEE Transactions on Education

    Page(s): 119
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  • Now is the best time to join our society

    Page(s): 120
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  • Information for authors

    Page(s): nil2
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Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University