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NanoBioscience, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Sept. 2010

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): C1
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  • IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience publication information

    Page(s): C2
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  • Preparation and Characterization of Iron Oxide–Silica Composite Particles Using Mesoporous SBA-15 Silica as Template and Their Internalization Into Mesenchymal Stem Cell and Human Bone Cell Lines

    Page(s): 165 - 170
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (887 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A new procedure for preparing iron oxide-silica nanocomposite particles using SBA-15 mesoporous silica as a template is described. These composite materials retained the 2-D hexagonal structure of the SBA-15 template. Transmission electron micrograms of the particles depicted the formation of iron oxide nanocrystals inside the mesochannels of SBA-15 silica framework. Powder x-ray diffraction showed that the iron oxide core of the composite particles consists of a mixture of maghemite ( γ-Fe2O3) and heamatite ( α-Fe2O3), which is the predominant component. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry studies showed that these iron oxide-silica composite materials exhibit superparamagnetic properties. On increasing the iron oxide content, the composite particles exhibited a stronger response to magnetic fields but a less homogeneous core, with some large iron oxide particles which were thought to be formed outside the mesochannels of the SBA-15 template. Internalization of these particles into human cell lines (mesenchymal stem cells and human bone cells), which indicates their potential in medicine and biotechnology, is also discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Characterizing Mechanical Properties of Biological Cells by Microinjection

    Page(s): 171 - 180
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1368 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Microinjection has been demonstrated to be an effective technique to introduce foreign materials into biological cells. Despite the advance, whether cell injection can be used to characterize the mechanical properties of cells remains elusive. In this paper, extending the previously developed mechanical model, various constitutive materials are adopted to present the membrane characteristics of cells. To demonstrate the modeling approach and identify the most appropriate constitutive material for a specific biomembrane, finite element analysis (FEA) and experimental tests are carried out. It is shown that the modeling results agree well with those from both FEA and experiments, which demonstrates the validity of the developed approach. Moreover, Yeoh and Cheng materials are found to be the best constitutive materials in representing the deformation behaviors of zebrafish embryos and mouse embryos (or oocytes), respectively. Also, the mechanical properties of zebrafish embryos at different developmental stages and mouse embryos (or oocytes) are characterized. View full abstract»

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  • 3-D Spot Modeling for Automatic Segmentation of cDNA Microarray Images

    Page(s): 181 - 192
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1596 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Spot segmentation-the second essential stage of cDNA microarray image analysis-constitutes a challenging process. At present, several up-to-date spot-segmentation techniques or software programs-proposed in the literature-are often characterized as “automatic.” On the contrary, they are in effect not fully automatic since they require human intervention in order to specify mandatory input parameters or to correct their results. Human intervention, however, can inevitably modify the actual results of the cDNA microarray experiment and lead to erroneous biological conclusions. Therefore, the development of an automated spot-segmentation process becomes of exceptional interest. In this paper, an original and fully automatic approach to accurately segmenting the spots in a cDNA microarray image is presented. In order for the segmentation to be accomplished, each real spot of the cDNA microarray image is represented in a three-dimensional (3-D) space by a 3-D spot model. Each 3-D spot model is determined via an optimization problem, which is solved by using a genetic algorithm. The segmentation of real spots is conducted by drawing the contours of their 3-D spot models. The proposed method has been compared with various published and established techniques, using several synthetic and real cDNA microarray images that contain thousands of spots. The outcome has shown that the proposed method outperforms prevalent existing techniques. It is also noise resistant and yields excellent results even under adverse conditions such as the appearance of spots of various sizes and shapes. View full abstract»

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  • Modeling Gross Damage in Tile-Based Nanomanufacturing by DNA Self-Assembly

    Page(s): 193 - 203
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1221 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes a novel model for gross damage as occurring in tile-based nanomanufacturing by DNA self-assembly. Gross damage occurs due to exogenous agents (such as radiation and tip-sample interactions) and is modeled as a hole (with a large number of empty tile sites) in the aggregate of the self-assembly. A stochastic analysis based on Markov chains for the tile binding process is pursued for regrowth of the tiles. This analysis establishes resilience as the probability to regrow the target pattern in the area affected by the gross damage. The conditions by which regrowth of a hole is favorable (i.e., at high resilience) compared with normal growth are established by considering temperature of aggregation and bond energy. As examples, two patterns for nano interconnects are analyzed based on the proposed model. View full abstract»

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  • Influence of Uncertain Electrical Properties on the Conditions for the Onset of Electroporation in an Eukaryotic Cell

    Page(s): 204 - 212
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    A detailed numerical investigation concerning the influence on the electrical response of an eukaryotic cell model due to the variations of the conductivity and permittivity of the plasma and nuclear membranes is carried out by means of a vertex analysis. The dynamics of three cell performances, the voltages across the external and the nuclear membrane, and the pores density are analyzed by adopting a novel FEM-based model coupled with the nonlinear equation describing the electroporation (EP) phenomenon. The variations of the electrical and morphological performances, when the cell is stressed by a nonideal step input, are studied in three interesting regimes, i.e., at the nominal threshold for the onset of EP, and when the applied stress is over or under the EP threshold. The performed numerical analysis puts in evidence that, around the nominal EP threshold, uncertainties may lead to an indeterminate state of the plasma membrane, whereas the other two regimes remain well definite. View full abstract»

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  • Design and Analysis of Molecular Relay Channels: An Information Theoretic Approach

    Page(s): 213 - 221
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1184 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we consider a molecular relay channel in which signal molecules are transmitted by a sender of communication, propagated, amplified, removed in the channel, and sensed by the receiver of communication that decodes the signal molecules. To understand and characterize the communication capacity of the molecular relay channel, we develop an information communication model that consists of the transmitter, channel, and receiver. Mutual information is used to quantify the amount of information that is transferred from the transmitter through the channel to the receiver. The method employed and results presented in this paper may help elucidate design principles of biological systems as well as help in the design and engineering of synthetic biological systems from the perspective of information theory. View full abstract»

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  • Leading the field since 1884 [advertisement]

    Page(s): 222
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  • IEEE copyright form

    Page(s): 223 - 224
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  • IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience information for authors

    Page(s): C3
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  • Blank page [back cover]

    Page(s): C4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience publishes basic and applied papers dealing both with engineering, physics, chemistry, modeling and computer science and with biology and medicine with respect to molecules, cells, tissues. The content of acceptable papers ranges from practical/clinical/environmental applications to formalized mathematical theory.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Henry Hess
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Columbia University