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Professional Communication, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Sept. 2010

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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): C1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication publication information

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): C2
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  • Editorial: Technical Communication and Usability Studies

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 189 - 190
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Technical Communication and Usability: Intertwined Strands and Mutual Influences

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 191 - 201
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (353 KB)  

    Technical communication and usability (user experience, or UX) have a long, intertwined history, dating back at least to the 1970s. The author, who has been active in both fields for the last three decades, gives many examples of how technical communicators have influenced UX practice and how usability specialists have influenced technical communication. The author also explores how technical communicators can continue to contribute to future UX theory, research, and practice through collaboration, through their communication skills, dealing with the reality of ever-increasing complexity in products and processes and dealing with the need to adapt to more rapid change. View full abstract»

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  • Assessing Concurrent Think-Aloud Protocol as a Usability Test Method: A Technical Communication Approach

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 202 - 215
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (438 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Concurrent think-aloud protocol (CTA) is often used in usability test settings to gain insight into participants' thoughts during their task performances. This study adds to a growing body of research within technical communication that addresses the use of think-aloud protocols in usability test settings. The eye movements and verbalizations of 10 participants were recorded as they searched for information on a website. The analysis of transcripts and real-time eye movement showed that CTA is an accurate data-collection method. The researcher found that the majority of user verbalizations in the study included words, phrases, and sentences that users read from the screen. Silence and verbal fillers that occurred during CTA enabled users to assess and process information during their searches. This study demonstrates the value technical communicators add to the study of usability test methods, and the paper recommends future avenues of research. View full abstract»

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  • Synthesizing IT Case Studies of Nonprofits Using a Multiple-Level Patterns-Based Framework

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 216 - 232
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1879 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To better understand how individuals, groups, and organizations can use information systems more effectively, a research approach closer to the level of social interchange is required. A multiple-level, sustainable, information-technology (IT) learning framework, rooted in patterns of practice and constructed by participatory action research, offers an alternative methodology for investigating sustainable strategies of IT learning. The framework evolved from concrete instances of IT learning across organizational case studies. A patterns-based analysis of the ethnographic data enabled the examination of informal IT learning in community contexts and the identification of IT interventions more likely to produce successful learning outcomes. View full abstract»

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  • Towards a Pedagogy of Relational Space and Trust: Analyzing Distributed Collaboration Using Discourse and Speech Act Analysis

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 233 - 248
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (400 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Distributed work is an increasingly common phenomenon in a number of technical and professional settings, and the complexity of this work requires high degrees of knowledge sharing and integration that move beyond assembly-line approaches to collaboration. Since participants in distributed-work settings rely almost exclusively on written and spoken language to mediate their collaborative relationships, professional communication faculty need educational approaches that empower students with language practices designed specifically to support effective teaming in these complex environments. To address this need, we employ discourse analysis and Speech Act Theory to identify these language practices in a case study of two cohorts of distributed, interdisciplinary, and cross-cultural student teams. The findings show correlations between language practices and successful collaboration. These correlations have significant implications for teaching and practice. View full abstract»

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  • Employee Reactions to Paper and Electronic Surveys: An Experimental Comparison

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 249 - 259
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Multimedia
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (142 KB)  

    Using a within-subjects field experiment, we tested the differences between paper-based and electronic employee surveys. Employees of a large organization were invited to respond to a paper survey as well as an identical electronic survey. Results from 134 employees who completed both questionnaires indicated that electronic surveys were seen as marginally easier to use and more enjoyable than paper surveys. However, the paper-based questionnaires produced a higher response rate. The self-reported likelihood that participants would respond to similar questionnaires in the future did not differ between the two formats. After comparing the answers on survey items that measured feelings of well-being and spending patterns, data quality also appeared to be equivalent across the two formats. Conceptual issues, as well as the implications for managers who are administering employee surveys, are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Ethos, Pathos, Logos, Kairos: Using a Rhetorical Heuristic to Mediate Digital-Survey Recruitment Strategies

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 260 - 277
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (390 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    How might the rhetorical strategies of ethos, pathos, logos, and kairos play a mediational, intervening role in the successful administration of online surveys? What are the general costs and benefits of conducting survey research? Based on the activity of administering an online survey ( N= 334) testing knowledge and understanding of US copyright law among digital writers (both students and teachers) in US technical and professional writing (TPW) programs, I blend Rhetorical Theory with Activity Theory by conducting a rhetorical analysis within an Activity Theory paradigm. I posit that a rhetorically informed heuristic mediates between the researcher and potential participants when the researcher attempts to recruit individuals to respond to an online survey. View full abstract»

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  • Effects of National Culture on Types of Knowledge Sharing in Virtual Communities

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 278 - 292
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (310 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Organizations are using virtual communities to facilitate knowledge management and to enhance communication among employees, customers, and other interested individuals. Individual users can use virtual communities to engage in knowledge sharing. Professional communicators need to understand and adapt to a globalized and “flat” world, where people across different cultures interact freely and easily with one another in virtual communities. An intriguing question regarding virtual communities relates to whether national culture affects communication and types of knowledge sharing. This study examines the influence of US and Chinese national cultures on types of knowledge-sharing activities in virtual communities. The findings indicate that national culture differences between China and the US are also evident in virtual community environments. View full abstract»

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  • Improving Professional Writing for Lay Practitioners: A Rhetorical Approach

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 293 - 303
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (173 KB)  

    This tutorial presents a workshop aimed at developing persuasive writing skills among lay practitioners with limited literacy who are required to write reports for professionals in a social-service delivery context. Drawing on Ong's distinction between the communication patterns of oral and literate culture, the workshop was designed to utilize participants' existing oral communication patterns as the underpinning for developing rhetorical strategies appropriate for their professional audience. The workshop consisted of a four-phase process of iterative questioning: identifying audience, defining project goals, formulating feasible outcomes, and assembling relevant evidence and support. View full abstract»

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  • Structuring a Corporate Request: An International Website Critique Suited to the Net Generation

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 304 - 316
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (597 KB)  

    This tutorial is the outgrowth of a corporate request for a website critique by undergraduate, Net-Generation (Net-Gen) students. Fifty-four sophomores working in teams of four and five in the College of Business at the University of Southern Indiana critiqued the website of Kimball International. The report resulted in high-quality criticism of the technology, a deep response to the affective qualities of the website, and recommendations that were accepted by the corporation. This tutorial offers recommendations for this style project's repetition using pedagogical techniques appropriate to the Net-Gen. View full abstract»

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  • Documentation: A History and Critique of Attribution, Commentary, Glosses, Marginalia, Notes, Bibliographies, Works-Cited Lists, and Citation Indexing and Analysis (Hauptman, R.) [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 317 - 319
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  • Network: Theorizing Knowledge Work in Telecommunications (Spinuzzi, C.) [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 320 - 321
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  • Handbook of Research on Virtual Workplaces and the New Nature of Business Practices (Zemliansky, P. and St. Amant, K.) [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 322 - 324
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  • The Global English Style Guide: Writing Clear, Translatable Documentation for a Global Market (Kohl, J.R.) [ Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 325 - 326
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  • IEEE-PC Article Abstracts

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 327
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  • Call for papers-Tutorials and Teaching Cases

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 328
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  • IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication Information for authors

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): C3
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  • IEEE Professional Communication Society Information

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): C4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication is a peer-reviewed journal devoted to applied research on professional communication--including but not limited to technical and business communication. It has been published since 1957 by the Professional Communication Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Saul Carliner
Concordia University