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Power Engineering Review, IEEE

Issue 7 • Date July 1984

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 83
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Power Engineering Society

    Page(s): nil1
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  • [Breaker page]

    Page(s): nil1
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  • Information for authors

    Page(s): nil1
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  • Contents

    Page(s): 1 - 2
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  • Summary Editors

    Page(s): 2
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  • The President's Column Volunteers

    Page(s): 3 - 4
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  • Public Affairs Council

    Page(s): 6
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  • IEEE Power Engineering Society Nominations

    Page(s): 9 - 10
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  • IEEE Candidates' Statements

    Page(s): 10 - 11
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  • Chapter News

    Page(s): 11 - 12
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  • Technical Council News

    Page(s): 13
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  • Pumping Heat Into Cold Water

    Page(s): 14 - 16
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    First Page of the Article
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  • EEI International Standards Seminar

    Page(s): 17 - 18
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    The increasing importance of international factors in standards development was addressed by more than twenty recently appointed EEI Technical Contacts to International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) U.S. Technical Advisory Groups (TAGs) at an EEI Seminar on March 28. They met with a like number of representatives from the major standards developing organizations, members of the EEI Standards Coordinating Committee, and EEI staff to discuss electric utility industry involvement in international standardization and EEl's role. The EEI Technical Contacts are the official EEI representatives to U.S. TAGs for 27 IEC Committees and Subcommittees that have been identified by the Codes and Standards Executive Advisory Committee (EAC) as being particularly pertinent to electric utility interests. The EEI representatives will actively participate in seventeen TAGs and monitor the remainder. This effort is administered by the EEI Standards Coordinating Committee and is the major element of a comprehensive EEI program to assess the significance and effectiveness of U.S. international standardization activities and the level of electric utility participation that may be warranted. Howard Huggett, Chairman of the Codes and Standards EAC, explained how a study was commissioned by that committee which concluded that international standards were beginning to be more influential in domestic standards development and commerce. This influence is expected to grow. Mr. Huggett emphasized that cost effectiveness was an inherent requirement in all aspects of this EEI project. Early in 1985, recommendations on EEl's long term role will be made to the Institute's Policy Committee. View full abstract»

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  • Research News

    Page(s): 18 - 19
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  • Call For Papers

    Page(s): 19 - 20
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  • IEEE Power Engineering Society Technical Committee Meetings

    Page(s): 20 - 21
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  • Other meetings of interest

    Page(s): 21
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  • Moving / Order forms

    Page(s): 22
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  • Fuel Resource Scheduling, Part I: Overview of an Energy Management Problem

    Page(s): 24
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    This paper at an overview level discusses the problems of fuel and resource scheduling (FRS) in an energy management system (EMS). For a computer-based FRS, a hierarchical scheduling scheme is proposed so that long-term strategy over a year can be meaningfully translated into realtime decisions for loading the units. In this process FRS has been decomposed into individual problems of resource budgeting for long-term fuel scheduling, resource scheduling for short-term fuel scheduling, and real-time fuel scheduling functions of real-time resource scheduling and resource constrained economic dispatch. The paper addresses the data requirements and the technical problems associated with each individual function; and the coordination of these four functions in an EMS environment. Fuel resource scheduling (FRS) optimizes long-term fuel consumption based upon load and generating unit characteristics, and resource availability constraints. FRS translates the optimum long-term strategy to real-time (hours to minutes) constraints to be used by the economic dispatch for the realtime allocation of system generation requirement among the units. FRS covers a wide range of time periods (from one year to minutes) and involves a large number of constraints and variables. This makes the fuel constrained generation dispatch and control process extremely difficult for system dispatchers even with the aid of computers. This paper addresses the problems associated with FRS as an integral part of an energy management system. View full abstract»

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  • Fuel Resource Scheduling, Part II: Constrained Economic Dispatch

    Page(s): 24 - 25
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    The constrained economic dispatch, subject to fuel supply and consumption constraints and unit operating constraints, with shared and mixed fuels, is formulated as a minimum cost network flow problem. Different algorithms are presented to handle the linear and nonlinear input/output characteristics of the units. The test results for a 17 unit/17 contract test system indicate that the proposed algorithms are fast enough for use in energy control center applications. The economic dispatch of the total generation requirement of a power system is usually accomplished by loading each generating unit to the same incremental cost level unless otherwise constrained by the unit operating limits. However, in the actual operation, the dispatch may be dictated by fuel and operating constraints [1,2]. Fuel constraints consist of fuel supply limits by contract, and fuel consumption constraints by unit-stockpile pair and certain groups of units. Operating constraints include system generation requirements, unit operating limits, unit input/ output (I/O) characteristics and penalty factors. The paper presents network flow (NF) algorithms for solving the economic dispatch problem subject to various fuel supply and consumption constraints and unit operating limits with shared and mixed fuels. Here each constraint is represented as a limit on the amount of fuel flow in an arc of the network. The paper considers two different cases of unit I/O characteristics. First, with piece-wise linear I/O characteristics of the units, the dispatch problem is formulated as a minimum cost linear network flow algorithm. View full abstract»

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