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Computing & Control Engineering Journal

Issue 2 • Date Apr 1993

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Experience with some early computers

    Page(s): 63 - 67
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (424 KB)  

    In the early l950s, computers filled lace rooms, consumed enormous quantities of power, broke down regularly and came without any software at all. Programming was initially in absolute machine code, memory was extremely limited and I/O was rudimentary. Virtually every program presented some novel, intellectual challenge. The author's own programming experience began on the Manchester Mark 1 machine and continued via the IBM 704 to the Univac 1103A, by which time (1958) Fortran and the operating systems had arrived, machines were much smaller, were far more reliable and had `enormous' memories of up to 32K words. The characteristics of these early machines and the joys and pains of programming them are described View full abstract»

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  • VHDL-based expert system for hardware synthesis-an overview

    Page(s): 85 - 91
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (424 KB)  

    An expert system is described for hardware synthesis. Details of the target digital system are input to the expert system using very high speed integrated circuit hardware description language (VHDL). The VHDL representation is first translated to a knowledge representation scheme, known as a `hologram', which is a combination of rule, frame and semantic network representation schemes. The hologram representation of the target system is then input to the inference engine, which matches the target system to the knowledge base components and selects an appropriate set for implementation, and connects them, creating a digital circuit. The expert system approach results in designs very close to designs from a human designer. In its present form, the system does not perform a design space exploration for alternate designs, but expects the designer to alter the VHDL representation, after observing the results from previous design cycles View full abstract»

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  • Anaesthesia simulators for the design of supervisory rule-based control in the operating theatre

    Page(s): 55 - 62
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (628 KB)  

    The development of online drug administration strategies in operating theatres represents a highly safety-critical situation. The usefulness of different levels of simulation prior to clinical trials has been shown in previous studies in muscle relaxant anaesthesia. Thus, in earlier work on pole-placement self-tuning for muscle relaxation, a dual computer real-time simulation was undertaken, subsequent to algorithm validation via off-line simulation. In the approach presented, a supervised rule-based control algorithm is used. The control software was implemented on the actual machine to be used in theatre, while another computer acted as a real-time patient simulator. This set-up has further advantages of providing accurate timing and also finite data accuracy via the ADC/DAC interface, or the equivalent digital lines. Also, it provides for the controller design fast simulation studies compared with the real-time application View full abstract»

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  • Vision-controlled CNC machines

    Page(s): 92 - 96
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (376 KB)  

    Laboratory tests have been conducted to explore the performance capability of a CNC machine process incorporating a vision inspection system. It has been demonstrated that the approach can be usefully applied to existing machines at relatively low cost. A proposal for a fully integrated control scheme is presented View full abstract»

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  • CAD systems in mechanical and electronic design: usage and implications some years after introduction

    Page(s): 79 - 84
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (428 KB)  

    Design employees from three companies participated in a study carried out to examine their experiences of computer-aided-design work. Most of the CAD users appreciated the ease in altering drawings and the ease in testing alternative solutions offered by CAD systems. Dependence on the CAD system was a disadvantage reported by many CAD users and one-quarter of them experienced a sense of inadequacy in relation to the system as a consequence of difficult commands and confusing information obtained from the system View full abstract»

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  • Index matching hardware for selective clause retrieval in large Prolog knowledge bases

    Page(s): 69 - 78
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (756 KB)  

    While interest in the use of Prolog for knowledge base applications is growing, the size of these applications is limited by the capabilities of current Prolog translators for handling disc resident clauses. A major impediment is the inordinate amount of time required for retrieval and unification of clauses from a large set stored on disc. The clause retrieval engine (CLARE) is a hardware engine designed specially to enhance the performance of Prolog systems when dealing with large clause sets. It is based on selective retrieval of disc resident clauses using a superimposed codeword indexing strategy. The principle of the index matching strategy is explained and the design of corresponding hardware is described View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Published from 2003-2007, Computing and Control Engineering was concerned with computing, communications, control and instrumentation.

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