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Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Aug. 2010

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Displaying Results 1 - 22 of 22
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): C1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management publication information

    Page(s): C2
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  • Editorial for August 2010 Issue

    Page(s): 361 - 364
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  • Understanding Online Interruption-Based Advertising: Impacts of Exposure Timing, Advertising Intent, and Brand Image

    Page(s): 365 - 379
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (634 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Interruption-based advertising has gained prominence in the online channel. Yet, little attention has been paid to deriving design principles and conceptualizations for online interruption-based advertising. This paper examines three novel design factors related to this phenomenon, namely, exposure timing, advertising intent, and brand image. Exposure timing pertains to the time by which the advertisement (ad) is launched within a website. Advertising intent refers to the explicitness of ad content in portraying the desire to induce purchase behavior. Brand image relates to consumers' overall perceptions of the advertised brand. In a laboratory experiment, participants were exposed to pop-up ads that were operationalized based on these three design considerations. Results reveal three two-way interactions among the study constructs. Online interruption-based ads shown in the predecisional shopping phase are more effective when their contents are designed with implicit advertising intent compared to explicit intent. Brand image is found to moderate the effects of advertising intent on consumer's purchase intention. Participants' responses also show that ads promoting weak brands with less favorable image tend to enjoy higher purchase intention when shown in the predecisional phase compared with the postdecisional phase. Theoretical and practical implications together with suggestions for future research are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Clarifying the Integration of Trust and TAM in E-Commerce Environments: Implications for Systems Design and Management

    Page(s): 380 - 393
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (524 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Two dominant theories-trust and technology acceptance-have been employed in numerous information systems research studies to help understand consumer behavior in e-commerce environments. In this context of voluntary Web site adoption and use, we provide a more precise understanding of the nomological network related to the cognitive variables (both beliefs and attitudes) that precede this use. Designers and engineers need to be concerned not just with building an objectively better Web site but also with building a Web site that conveys desirable characteristics. Although the theory of reasoned action has been acknowledged as the underlying theory for technology acceptance and some trust research, past studies integrating these two theories have omitted important variables from their models and have posited different causal relationships among model variables. This research argues for the reinclusion and/or clarification of belief and attitude constructs relevant to technology acceptance and trust research streams, explains why these constructs are critical for understanding causality in such models, proposes an integration model that is consistent with this argument, and finally tests this model in a context exploring initial reactions to an e-vendor and evaluates the relative importance of trust and technology acceptance variables in predicting user intentions. View full abstract»

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  • Multiperiod Remanufacturing Planning With Uncertain Quality of Inputs

    Page(s): 394 - 404
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (507 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we consider production planning when inputs have different and uncertain quality levels, and there are capacity constraints. This situation is typical of most remanufacturing environments, where inputs are product returns (also called cores). Production (remanufacturing) cost increases as the quality level decreases, and any unused cores may be salvaged at a value that increases with their quality level. Decision variables include, for each period and under a certain probabilistic scenario, the amount of cores to grade, the amount to remanufacture for each quality level, and the amount of inventory to carry over for future periods for ungraded cores, graded cores, and finished remanufactured products. Our model is grounded with data collected at a major original equipment manufacturer that also remanufactures. We formulate the problem as a stochastic program; although it is a large linear program, it can be solved easily using Cplex. We provide a numeric study to generate insights into the nature of the solution. View full abstract»

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  • Performance Evaluation in Multistep Processes—A Comparison of Evaluation Types With Special Emphasis on R&D

    Page(s): 405 - 415
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (341 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The construction of efficient performance evaluation and incentive systems is an important element of modern R&D management. As R&D activities are characterized by a high degree of sequentiality, there is an ongoing discussion as to whether R&D staff that provides the basis for following projects should be evaluated only on the basis of their individual performance or on the basis of measures that incorporate the subsequent projects. This paper analyzes the merits of both approaches, with special emphasis on the risk factors that affect R&D activities. The analysis provides a scheme that differentiates several types of R&D activities, locates them within a broader group of multistep processes of firms, and provides an adequate approach to performance evaluation for each of these processes. View full abstract»

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  • R&D Team's Competencies, Innovation, and Growth With Knowledge Information Flow

    Page(s): 416 - 429
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (221 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper analyzes the interaction among the step-by-step innovation, the product market competition (PMC), and the knowledge information flow in the growth process. Patents protect their holders from being imitated or copied but do not protect them against the possibility that less-efficient competitors master the diffused knowledge. The degree to which diffused knowledge should be exploited by less-efficient firms is determined by both their knowledge assimilating capacities and Research and Development (R&D) teams' competence type and level. The individual skill distribution in R&D team may lead to different innovative behaviors: replicating the knowledge or creation of novel knowledge. Here, we first find that replicating the knowledge and creation of novel knowledge are both growth enhancing; second, the more the flexibility on individual creativity in R&D team is, the faster is the growth; third, the knowledge information flow has a polarization effect on firms' innovative performance. View full abstract»

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  • Determinants of Knowledge Management Assimilation: An Empirical Investigation

    Page(s): 430 - 449
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3659 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Knowledge management (KM) and its effective assimilation as an interrelated innovation are critical to the success of contemporary organizations, and have recently attracted increasing interest. The sources of influence on successful KM assimilation were explored via a study of Korean firms. A synthesis of previous studies that had utilized various theories to investigate KM variables yields six critical factors (i.e., knowledge worker, technical knowledge infrastructure, external knowledge linkage, knowledge strategy, internal knowledge climate, and knowledge management process), which facilitate KM assimilation. We then evaluated the effects of these critical factors on the level of KM assimilation, using responses from 187 Korean organizations that had already implemented enterprise-wide KM systems. Our findings show that four of the six variables were significantly related to KM assimilation. Interestingly, the KM process was found to be the most critical factor in the proliferation of KM activities across an organization, and knowledge strategy and external knowledge linkage were identified as insignificant ones for KM assimilation. The findings of this paper are expected not only to serve as early groundwork for researchers hoping to understand KM and its effective assimilation in organizations, but also to provide practitioners with guidelines as to how they can enhance their KM assimilation level, thus improving their organizational performance. View full abstract»

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  • Language as a Resource in Project Management: A Case Study and a Conceptual Framework

    Page(s): 450 - 462
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (404 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This study sheds light on how project managers can use language as a resource for communicating with local communities and stakeholders alike, and protect the legitimacy of their decisions and actions. The verbal accounts produced by a senior project management team are examined in-depth. The accounts address the claims raised by residents affected by the expansion of the Heathrow airport. The context for the talk-in-interaction is one of conflicting interests: the promoter undertakes actions to mitigate the impacts of the construction works, but some residents feel frustrated that the business can grow at the expenses of their welfare. The findings reveal that managers tend to acknowledge all claims even when perceiving they lack legitimacy. The analysis of the words and phrasing in the conversational turns that form the accounts reveals three tones - caring, assertive, and apologetic - that managers use intentionally to frame linguistically the acknowledgements. The study discusses how the tones fit with the extent to which, first, managers consider that the claims are factually correct, fair, and precise as opposed to unfair, exaggerated, or opportunistic; and second, managers find technical or institutional references available for constructing the accounts. It also discusses the effects of congruence - or the lack of it - between what managers mean to say about what the project team will do, what managers actually say, how listeners interpret what was said, and what the project team actually gets done. View full abstract»

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  • Modeling Strategic Decisions Using Activity Diagrams to Consider the Contribution of Dynamic Planning in the Profitability of Projects Under Uncertainty

    Page(s): 463 - 476
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (551 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, a framework to consider the contribution of decision making and dynamic planning in the profitability of a project under uncertainty is proposed. Unified modeling language (UML) activity diagrams are constructed for different strategies of an ongoing engineering project whose final profitability is highly influenced by a set of uncertain variables, such as demand, costs and prices, or unexpected events. Some of these strategies can be, for instance, expanding, contracting, switching, abandoning, waiting, transferring, etc. A method to derive a simple mathematical model for carrying out a project from any UML activity diagram describing the strategy is also presented. This mathematical model can be easily implemented in a simulation environment, where the random nature of the different uncertain variables of the project, the relationships between them, and its final profitability can be considered. An example of the application of the proposed model is shown. This example also illustrates how to model the uncertainty in demand by means of a stochastic Bass process. We suggest that the proposed methodology be used by itself or as a complementary tool to the existing methods of capital budgeting by solving some of the deficiencies found in them. For instance: 1) net present value or return on investment is static in nature and cannot cope with uncertainty; 2) real options valuation may be an obscure technique and in many cases does not allow an operational strategy to be derived for guiding the project in real life; and 3) decision analysis occurs within the problem of the “flaw of averages,” by using expected values of different uncertain variables to calculate the profitability of a project instead of their complete probability distribution. View full abstract»

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  • Software Quality as Influenced by Informational Diversity, Task Conflict, and Learning in Project Teams

    Page(s): 477 - 487
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (468 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    From one perspective, diversity leads to an increase in the knowledge and viewpoints that adds to the creativity of the solution and methods during a software development project. From another perspective, diversity adds to the conflict in a project team, which detracts significantly from the desired results. This contradiction may be best explained by an examination of different forms of diversity. This study reports a model that considers informational diversity, in the form of a larger variety of background knowledge, in the system development context. Learning and information theories dictate that conflict related to the completion of tasks will increase under informational diversity. Task-related conflict should, in turn, create learning opportunities, which will provide the spark needed to improve the quality of the software generated by a project team. A team level analysis of survey data from 299 members of 75 development teams confirms these relationships. The promotion of learning leverages the benefits of informational diversity and serves as a mediator between task-related conflict and software quality. View full abstract»

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  • A Stochastic Model for Pharmaceutical R&D Project Management in a Make-or-Buy Decision Setting

    Page(s): 488 - 501
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (231 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Managing a pharmaceutical R&D project is a complex undertaking that involves efforts from both business managers and scientists. The increasing complexity of exploratory activities in pharmaceutical innovation makes less likely that a project can stand alone. Project managers not only resort to in-house innovation but also external sources to propel a central project. In this paper, the authors propose a make-or-buy stochastic process model as an integrated project management tool with the goal of maximizing the successful probability of a prospective drug compound. The model illustrates the two-process-line practice in pharmaceutical R&D projects and combines this practice with the make-or-buy decision that managers always face in pharmaceuticals. Using this model, the authors discuss the decision strategies at different phases of a pharmaceutical R&D project and provide optimal solutions based on the remaining time of the project. A case study demonstrates the model's effectiveness. The model offers potential benefits in terms of its ability to transform key learning into efficient and reliable managerial decision-making practices that are well aligned with drug innovation strategies. View full abstract»

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  • Business Process Integration of Multiple Customer Order Review Systems

    Page(s): 502 - 512
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (271 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Mergers and acquisitions of small- to medium-size manufacturing firms often result in an inefficient system of operations. A major issue is how to integrate existing operations from different business processes to streamline service and exploit economy of scales. Standard methodologies are often not adequate in these situations and there is a need for a new methodology to focus on consolidation of processes. We develop a mathematical model of the problem and show that the integration problem can be solved by quantitative techniques such as optimization and Monte Carlo simulation. We study general properties of the model and apply it to the consolidation of the contract review system of a particular company. We show that our approach not only improved the overall performance of this company but also can be used for other companies in similar situation. View full abstract»

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  • Analyzing Product Development Task Networks to Examine Organizational Change

    Page(s): 513 - 525
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    This paper uses network analysis (NA) to study task interactions in the product development process (PDP) at a small engineering company (Smallcomp). We examine Smallcomp's organizational changes by comparing its PDP network properties at two points in time. The analysis identifies patterns of centralization, role specialization, and formalized control. This validates themes from organizational behavior and quality management literature regarding how organizations learn from experience, grow in size, and control their process variation. It demonstrates several insights to manage the PDP as both a second (i.e., effectively executing) and third order (i.e., highlighting underlying premises and assumptions) form of organizational control. First, reducing variation in task outputs is an understandable approach to controlling a PDP. However, it is important to reduce variation in task inputs as well. Second, tasks have varying roles and burdens in terms of how they share information with other tasks in the PDP. Companies seeking to support multiple concurrent projects must align their organizational resources to the distribution of labor created by the information flow among PDP tasks. Finally, an NA metric called Simmelian ties can measure effective concurrency in a PDP by identifying both valuable and ineffective iteration among groups of tasks. View full abstract»

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  • Journal subscription information

    Page(s): 526
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  • Forthcoming Engineering Management Related Conferences

    Page(s): 527
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  • Papers to be Published in Future Issues of IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management

    Page(s): 528 - 529
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  • Call for Papers 2011 IEEE International Technology Management Conference

    Page(s): 530
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  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management

    Page(s): 531 - 532
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  • IEEE Engineering Management Society Information

    Page(s): C3
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  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management information for authors

    Page(s): C4
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Aims & Scope

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E. 

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Rajiv Sabherwal
Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas