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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 5 • Date May 2010

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): c1
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  • This month's covers …

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): c2
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1
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  • In this issue - technically

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2
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  • From the Editor-In-Chief

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 3
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  • Mentoring: A key to longevity in Space

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 4 - 11
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    The Space Department at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) launched a formal mentoring program in 2007. While a mentoring program existed previously, it was not widely utilized and eventually lost support. The new program was designed to focus on the staff members' needs and desires for career growth and an opportunity for those skilled with years of expertise in the space domain to share their wisdom and gain a new perspective. Especially in an era where budgets are constrained, mentoring is a cost effective method to ensure continuity of knowledge and enthusiasm in staff. This discusses the motivations for starting the program, the hurdles involved, and the benefits derived during the first few years of APL's new Space Department mentoring program. This includes the design details of the program, as well as successes and lessons learned to date. View full abstract»

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  • Passive Coherent Location as Cognitive Radar

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 12 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
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    Cognitive Radar describes a generic radar system that is capable of adapting its transmission waveforms and cooperation with other sensors in order to achieve superior detection, recognition, and tracking of targets. For example, the sensors of a cognitive radar system might use the illumination signals to carry broadcast data, allowing the sharing of target information. Herein, we postulate that it would be possible to implement a cognitive version of Passive Coherent Location (PCL) which has much in common with the broad cognitive radar concept, but adapts only to the waveforms it senses in the environment, and exploits those that are most useful to it for target detection. In addition, it would model the terrain to improve coverage and provide countermeasures against direct signal saturation. By its name, PCL does not transmit, but relies on emissions from other radiating systems, such as broadcast services, other radars, cellular radio, WiFi, and so on. It is clear that such a system, consisting of multiple, cooperating receivers, can achieve excellent performance in the presence of deliberate jamming, difficult terrain, and attempts at target stealth. In the civilian radar domain, the technology offers opportunities for bandwidth conservation. View full abstract»

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  • Cognitive Radio for aeronautical air-ground communications

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 18 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
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    The system of air-ground communications is one of the most fundamental elements of air traffic control in the National Airspace System (NAS). The current air-ground voice communications systems are using the more than 50-year-old analog voice transmission technology in the licensed air traffic management VHF spectrum band. The limited spectrum is allocated statically based on air traffic control organization and geographic locations. With the increasing use of data applications for air-ground communications, the demand to effectively use the limited spectrum has increased. There are several proposed approaches to solve the projected saturated spectrum in the future. However, these approaches do not address the current practice of static spectrum allocation, which this author anticipates will be a major bottleneck for effective use of the limited spectrum. The current static channel assignment creates inefficient use of the limited spectrum. Regardless of whether a channel is used, it is permanently assigned to the particular geographical areas and organizations. This prevents other users from using the channels when the channels are idle. Also, this static allocation of the spectrum constrains the reassignment of channels and creates a long transition period for moving the existing analog system to a new digital system. The emerging Cognitive Radio (CR) technology provides the opportunity to address the static allocation of spectrum issue and offer a more flexible transition approach for updating the legacy air-ground radio system. The emerging CR technology provides the sensing of surrounding environment, allowing the radio to adapt to the environment accordingly. Built on software-defined radio (SDR) technology, CR is able to employ these features with the cognitive engine and the aid of several sensors. The cognitive engine carries out these tasks by obtaining all available information from sources such as sensors, protocol layers, a policy engine, and its own ha- - rdware, and then interprets, reasons, and makes the optimum decision to adapt. Integrated with ground radio stations and centralized management systems, the CR can dynamically use the available channels based on its actual location, environment condition, and, therefore, maximize the use of the limited spectrum. View full abstract»

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  • Adaptive tomographic sensors for below ground imaging

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 24 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Herein, ground penetrating radar and tomography are combined to detect and identify hidden targets, such as underground facilities and bard and deeply buried targets. Past experiences in below-ground imaging is described, current measurement results are presented, and future plans are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Uplink array concept demonstration with the EPOXI spacecraft

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 29 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Uplink array technology is currently being developed for NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN), to provide greater range and data throughput for future NASA missions, including manned missions to Mars and exploratory missions to the outer planets, the Kuiper belt, and beyond. The DSN uplink arrays employ N microwave antennas transmitting at X-band to produce signals that add coherently at the spacecraft, thereby providing a power gain of N2 over a single antenna. This gain can be traded off directly for N2 higher data rate at a given distance such as Mars, providing, for example, HD quality video broadcast from earth to a future manned mission, or it can provide a given data-rate for commands and software uploads at a distance N times greater than possible with a single antenna. The uplink arraying concept has been recently demonstrated using the three operations 34-meter antennas of the Apollo complex at Goldstone, CA, which transmitted arrayed signals to the EPOXI spacecraft. Both two-element and three-element uplink arrays were configured, and the theoretical array gains of 6 dB and 9.5 dB, respectively, were demonstrated experimentally. This required initial phasing of the array elements, the generation of accurate frequency predicts to maintain phase from each antenna despite relative velocity components due to earth-rotation and spacecraft trajectory, and monitoring of the ground system phase for possible drifts caused by thermal effects over the 16 km fiber-optic signal distribution network. This provides a description of the equipment and techniques used to demonstrate the uplink arraying concept in a relevant operational environment. Data collected from the EPOXI spacecraft was analyzed to verify array calibration, array gain, and system stability over the entire five hour duration of this experiment. View full abstract»

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  • See-and-avoid comparison of performance in manned and remotely piloted aircraft

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 36 - 42
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    See-and-avoid is the current FAA approved method for pilots to avoid objects and other aircraft while flying in visual meteorological conditions (VMC). Although fully autonomous “sense-and-avoid” or “detect-and-avoid” systems are in development, none are currently certified. Thus existing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operations are limited to case-by-case restricted airspace or require escort by manned aircraft. Many UAVs are equipped with at least a forward-looking camera. In the transition between current technology and future fully autonomous, certified sense-and-avoid systems, it seems reasonable to require a ground-based operator to perform the see-and-avoid function. This discusses the flight-testing performed to establish air traffic detection ranges for low-time pilots, and for a low-cost UAV camera system. The system was evaluated to determine if it could provide the equivalent see-and-avoid performance as the tested pilots. View full abstract»

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  • Future contributions to appear in the IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems [TAES]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 43
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  • Distinguished lecturers & tutorials

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 44
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  • IEEE Aerospace & Electronic Systems Society Organization

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 45
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  • Directory of IEEE-AESS personnel

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 46
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  • Student membership application

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 47
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  • Membership application

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 48
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  • Meetings calendar

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1
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  • [Back cover]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
SenTech, LLC - A DSCI Company
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Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 207-1900 ext: 2102
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