Notification:
We are currently experiencing intermittent issues impacting performance. We apologize for the inconvenience.
By Topic

Control Systems, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date June 2010

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 27
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): C1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (889 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (569 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Plagiarize This! [From the Editor]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 6 - 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (498 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Battery on Board [About This Issue]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 8 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1937 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Feedback

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 12 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (171 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • From Hard Copy to Electronic [President's Message]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 13 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1155 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • 25 Years Ago

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 15 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (169 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Control Systems Society

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (51 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Kalman Quickie [Ask the Experts]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 17 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (185 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Tourbillon and How It Works [Applications of Control]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 19 - 78
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (812 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The tourbillon is a mechanical device that was invented to improve the precision of old-fashioned pocket watches. These devices continually rotate the escapement, balance wheel, and spring to compensate for bias due to gravity. A high-quality modern mechanical watch can achieve a precision, referred to as rate error in the horological community, of 1 s per day, while a less expensive mechanical watch may attain a precision of 5 s per day. To place these figures in perspective, the precision of an inexpensive quartz watch is less than .5 s per day. Measuring the precision of a mechanical timepiece is not quite as obvious at it may seem because the variation in watch speed depends on various factors, such as temperature and spatial orientation. Temperature compensation has been the subject of much thought and experimentation over the centuries. Consequently, the construction of a modern mechanical watch is such that, over a limited temperature range, the watch is insensitive to variations in ambient temperature. Variation in both accuracy and precision, that is, in watch speed and rate error, due to the orientation of the gravitational field is a characteristic of oldfashioned pocket watches. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Yasamin Mostofi [People in Control]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 24 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (776 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Dale Ulrich [People in Control]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 26 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (2208 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • New Fellows [People in Control]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 29 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (905 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Adaptive Control and the NASA X-15-3 Flight Revisited

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 32 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2630 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, a new generation of hypersonic vehicles offers a far more effective way of launching small satellites or other vehicles into low-Earth orbit than expendable rockets. Additionally these aircraft facilitate quick response and global strike capabilities. Control of hypersonic vehicles is challenging due to the changes in the aircraft dynamics as the manuever takes the aircraft over large flight envelopes.The field of adaptive control began with the motivation that a controller that can adjust its parameters online could generate improved performance over a fixed-parameter counterpart. Subsequently, sobering lessons of tradeoffs between stability and performance directed the evolution of the field toward the design, analysis, and synthesis of stable adaptive systems. Various adaptive control methods have been developed for controlling linear and nonlinear dynamic systems with parametric and dynamic uncertainties.With the benefit of hindsight and subsequent research, the paper revisit the events of 1967 by examining "how and what if" scenarios.we analyze the X-15-3 aircraft dynamics and the Honeywell MH-96 adaptive controller in an effort to better understand how the sequence of events and the interplay between the controller and the aircraft dynamics might have led to the instability and resulting crash. It follows with a depiction of a Lyapunov-stability-based adaptive controller that incorporates gain scheduling and accommodates actuator magnitude saturation, which we denote as the gain-scheduled, magnitude-saturation-accommodating. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Algorithms for Advanced Battery-Management Systems

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 49 - 68
    Cited by:  Papers (47)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2288 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are ubiquitous sources of energy for portable electronic devices. Compared to alternative battery technologies, Li-ion batteries provide one of the best energy-to-weight ratios, exhibit no memory effect, and have low self-discharge when not in use. These beneficial properties, as well as decreasing costs, have established Li-ion batteries as a leading candidate for the next generation of automotive and aerospace applications. In the automotive sector, increasing demand for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs (PHEVs), and EVs has pushed manufacturers to the limits of contemporary automotive battery technology. This limitation is gradually forcing consideration of alternative battery technologies, such as Li-ion batteries, as a replacement for existing leadacid and nickel-metal-hydride batteries. Unfortunately, this replacement is a challenging task since automotive applications demand large amounts of energy and power and must operate safely, reliably, and durably at these scales. The article presents a detailed description and model of a Li-ion battery. It begins the section "Intercalation-Based Batteries" by providing an intuitive explanation of the fundamentals behind storing energy in a Li-ion battery. In the sections "Modeling Approach" and "Li-Ion Battery Model," it present equations that describe a Li-ion cell's dynamic behavior. This modeling is based on using electrochemical principles to develop a physics-based model in contrast to equivalent circuit models. A goal of this article is to present the electrochemical model from a controls perspective. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Applications of Kalman Filtering in Aerospace 1960 to the Present [Historical Perspectives]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 69 - 78
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (604 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In the 1960s, the Kalman filter was applied to navigation for the Apollo Project, which required estimates of the trajectories of manned spacecraft going to the Moon and back. With the lives of the astronauts at stake, it was essential that the Kalman filter be proven effective and reliable before it could be used. This article is about the lead up to Kalman's work, key discoveries in the development and maturation of the filter, a sampling of its many applications in aerospace, and recognition of some who played key roles in that history. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Path Through the Control Community [Perspectives]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 79 - 91
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1482 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Distributed Consensus in Multi-vehicle Cooperative Control: Theory and Applications (Ren, W. and Beard, R.W.; 2008) [Book Shelf]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 85 - 86
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (103 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Book announcements

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 87 - 91
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1326 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE ICCA 2009 [Conference Report]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 92 - 93
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1460 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Paths Ahead in the Science of Information and Decision Systems [Conference Report]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 93 - 96
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (3091 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • CDC 2010 in Atlanta, Georgia [CDC Preview]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 98 - 102
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (5830 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • 2010 IEEE Multiconference on Systems and Control: An Invitation to Yokohama/Tokyo [MSC Preview]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 104 - 106
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (3903 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Daniel W. Repperger, Jr. [Obituary]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 107 - 108
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (160 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Tsien Hsue-shen [Obituary]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 109
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (126 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IEEE Control Systems Magazine is the largest circulation technical periodical worldwide devoted to all aspects of control systems.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jonathan P. How
jhow@mit.edu