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Communications Surveys & Tutorials, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date Second Quarter 2010

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Second Quarter 2010 IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 138 - 139
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A Survey of BitTorrent Performance

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 140 - 158
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (536 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Since its inception, BitTorrent has proved to be the most popular approach for sharing large files using the peer-to-peer paradigm. BitTorrent introduced several innovative mechanisms such as tit-for-tat (TFT) and rarest first to enable efficient distribution of files among the participating peers. Several studies examining the performance of BitTorrent and its mechanisms have been published in the literature. In this paper, we present a survey of performance studies of BitTorrent from 2003 to 2008. We categorize these studies based on the techniques used, the mechanisms studied and the resulting observations about BitTorrent performance. Many of the performance studies also suggested modifications to BitTorrent's mechanisms to further improve its performance. We also present a survey of the suggested improvements and categorize them into different groups. View full abstract»

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  • Outlier Detection Techniques for Wireless Sensor Networks: A Survey

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 159 - 170
    Cited by:  Papers (53)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (290 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In the field of wireless sensor networks, those measurements that significantly deviate from the normal pattern of sensed data are considered as outliers. The potential sources of outliers include noise and errors, events, and malicious attacks on the network. Traditional outlier detection techniques are not directly applicable to wireless sensor networks due to the nature of sensor data and specific requirements and limitations of the wireless sensor networks. This survey provides a comprehensive overview of existing outlier detection techniques specifically developed for the wireless sensor networks. Additionally, it presents a technique-based taxonomy and a comparative table to be used as a guideline to select a technique suitable for the application at hand based on characteristics such as data type, outlier type, outlier identity, and outlier degree. View full abstract»

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  • A Survey on Methods for Broadband Internet Access on Trains

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 171 - 185
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2178 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a survey of approaches for providing broadband Internet access to trains. We examine some of the barriers that hinder the use of broadband Internet on trains and then discuss some of the opportunities for broadband deployment to trains. This survey considers some of the basic concepts for providing broadband Internet access and then reviews associated network architectures. The review of network architectures shows that we can subdivide networks for providing broadband Internet access to trains into the train-based network, the access network-for connecting the train to the service provider(s)-and the aggregation network-for collecting user packets generated in the access network for transmission to the Internet. Furthermore, our review shows that the current trend is to provide Internet access to passengers on trains using IEEE 802.11; however, a clear method for connecting trains to the global Internet has yet to emerge. A summary of implementation efforts in Europe and North America serves to highlight some of the schemes that have been used thus far to connect trains to the Internet. We conclude by discussing some of the models developed, from a technical perspective, for testing the viability of deploying Internet access to trains. View full abstract»

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  • Host Identity Protocol (HIP): Connectivity, Mobility, Multi-Homing, Security, and Privacy over IPv4 and IPv6 Networks

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 186 - 204
    Cited by:  Papers (15)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1160 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Host Identity Protocol (HIP) is an inter-networking architecture and an associated set of protocols, developed at the IETF since 1999 and reaching their first stable version in 2007. HIP enhances the original Internet architecture by adding a name space used between the IP layer and the transport protocols. This new name space consists of cryptographic identifiers, thereby implementing the so-called identifier/locator split. In the new architecture, the new identifiers are used in naming application level end-points (sockets), replacing the prior identification role of IP addresses in applications, sockets, TCP connections, and UDP-based send and receive system calls. IPv4 and IPv6 addresses are still used, but only as names for topological locations in the network. HIP can be deployed such that no changes are needed in applications or routers. Almost all pre-compiled legacy applications continue to work, without modifications, for communicating with both HIP-enabled and non-HIP-enabled peer hosts. The architectural enhancement implemented by HIP has profound consequences. A number of the previously hard networking problems become suddenly much easier. Mobility, multi-homing, and baseline end-to-end security integrate neatly into the new architecture. The use of cryptographic identifiers allows enhanced accountability, thereby providing a base for easier build up of trust. With privacy enhancements, HIP allows good location anonymity, assuring strong identity only towards relevant trusted parties. Finally, the HIP protocols have been carefully designed to take middle boxes into account, providing for overlay networks and enterprise deployment concerns. This article provides an in-depth look at HIP, discussing its architecture, design, benefits, potential drawbacks, and ongoing work. View full abstract»

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  • A Survey on Scheduling in IEEE 802.16 Mesh Mode

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 205 - 221
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (936 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    IEEE 802.16 standard (also known as WiMAX) defines the wireless broadband network technology which aims to solve the so called last mile problem via providing high bandwidth Internet even to the rural areas for which the cable deployment is very costly. The standard mainly focuses on the MAC and PHY layer issues, supporting two transmission modes: PMP (Point-to-Multipoint) and mesh modes. Mesh mode is an optional mode developed as an extension to PMP mode and it has the advantage of having an improving performance as more subscribers are added to the system using multi-hop routes. In 802.16 MAC protocol, mesh mode slot allocation and reservation mechanisms are left open which makes this topic a hot research area. Hence, the focus of this survey will mostly be on the mesh mode, and the proposed scheduling algorithms and performance evaluation methods. View full abstract»

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  • MAC Essentials for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 222 - 248
    Cited by:  Papers (65)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1199 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The wireless medium being inherently broadcast in nature and hence prone to interferences requires highly optimized medium access control (MAC) protocols. This holds particularly true for wireless sensor networks (WSNs) consisting of a large amount of miniaturized battery-powered wireless networked sensors required to operate for years with no human intervention. There has hence been a growing interest on understanding and optimizing WSN MAC protocols in recent years, where the limited and constrained resources have driven research towards primarily reducing energy consumption of MAC functionalities. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive state-of-the-art study in which we thoroughly expose the prime focus of WSN MAC protocols, design guidelines that inspired these protocols, as well as drawbacks and shortcomings of the existing solutions and how existing and emerging technology will influence future solutions. In contrast to previous surveys that focused on classifying MAC protocols according to the technique being used, we provide a thematic taxonomy in which protocols are classified according to the problems dealt with. We also show that a key element in selecting a suitable solution for a particular situation is mainly driven by the statistical properties of the generated traffic. View full abstract»

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  • A Taxonomy of IEEE 802.11 Wireless Parameters and Open Source Measurement Tools

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 249 - 262
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (371 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The analysis and evaluation of new wireless network protocols is a long process that requires mathematical analysis, simulations, and increasingly experimentations under real conditions. Measurements are essential to analyze the performance of wireless protocols such as IEEE 802.11 networks in real environments, but experimentations are complex to perform and analyze. Usually, network researchers develop their own tools, sometimes from scratch, to fit the requirements of their experimentations, and these tools are then abandoned when the paper is published. In this study, we emphasize the importance, for the network research community, to use and contribute to the development of open source measurement tools. In this regard, we propose a survey and classification of IEEE 802.11 wireless parameters and open source tools available to collect or estimate these parameters. We highlight the parameters that can be extracted from wireless traffic probes and those that are available through the driver of wireless cards. Then, we introduce and compare open source tools that can be used to make the measurements, with special attention to the flexibility of the tools and their application scope. Finally, we discuss with several case studies the combination of tools that best suit the needs of the wireless experiments and provide a list of common pitfalls to avoid. View full abstract»

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  • Ethernet – A Survey on its Fields of Application

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 263 - 284
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (724 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    During the last decades, Ethernet progressively became the most widely used local area networking (LAN) technology. Apart from LAN installations, Ethernet became also attractive for many other fields of application, ranging from industry to avionics, telecommunication, and multimedia. The expanded application of this technology is mainly due to its significant assets like reduced cost, backward-compatibility, flexibility, and expandability. However, this new trend raises some problems concerning the services of the protocol and the requirements for each application. Therefore, specific adaptations prove essential to integrate this communication technology in each field of application. Our primary objective is to show how Ethernet has been enhanced to comply with the specific requirements of several application fields, particularly in transport, embedded and multimedia contexts. The paper first describes the common Ethernet LAN technology and highlights its main features. It reviews the most important specific Ethernet versions with respect to each application field's requirements. Finally, we compare these different fields of application and we particularly focus on the fundamental concepts and the quality of service capabilities of each proposal. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials is an online journal published by the IEEE Communications Society for tutorials and surveys covering all aspects of the communications field. Telecommunications technology is progressing at a rapid pace, and the IEEE Communications Society is committed to providing researchers and other professionals the information and tools to stay abreast.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Ekram Hossain, Ph.D., P.Eng.
Professor
University of Manitoba